Author: Oyindamola AramideOyindamola Aramide is a graduate of English Language from Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife. She is a young development practitioner with interests in communications and corporate writing. She is currently the communications officer at the Nigeria Network of NGOs and engages the use of multimedia in her work.

NNNGO ORGANISES UPR ADVOCACY STRATEGY WORKSHOP

NNNGO ORGANISES UPR ADVOCACY STRATEGY WORKSHOP

In 2013, Nigeria accepted 10 recommendations relating to civic space with a view to strengthening the Nigerian civil society.

LAGOS, Nigeria, June 6, 2018–The Nigeria Network of NGOs, NNNGO engaged CSOs in an advocacy strategy to appraise the implementation of past recommendations of the Universal Periodic Review (UPR) and contribute to Nigeria’s submission in the forthcoming review.

The first human rights mechanism to ever achieve 100% participation, twice, by United Nations (UN) member states, the UPR was established in March 2006 by the Human Rights Council (HRC) with the aim of improving current human rights situation in each of the 193 UN member states.

It allows a review of the human rights situation of all UN Member States every 5 years with 42 States undergoing the review each year during three Working Group sessions dedicated to 14 States each.  The result of each review is reflected in the Final Report of the Working Group, which lists the recommendations the State under Review (SuR) will have to implement before the next review.

What makes the UPR especially unique is the inclusion of the civil society such that CSOs are allowed to advocate and take part in implementation of human rights obligations. Thus, a workshop was necessary in order to share outcomes of findings on the 10 recommendations on civic space, the contributions of civil society actors and recommendations as submitted jointly by CIVICUS and NNNGO.

Participants who comprised seventy-one Nonprofits dialogued at the UPR advocacy strategy workshop in view of examining the Nigerian Government’s compliance with its international human rights obligations to create and maintain a safe and enabling environment for civil society.

“Specifically, we analysed the Government of Nigeria’s fulfillment of the rights to freedom of association, peaceful assembly and expression as well as unwarranted restrictions on human rights defenders since its previous UPR examinations in October 2013 and noted gaps in the implementation of these recommendations” noted Ms. Chidinma Okpara, the resident UPR researcher for NNNGO.

In light of providing action-oriented follow-up recommendations, participants at the break-out session during the workshop identified areas of concern, broad goals and specific objectives founded on realities and challenges faced by nonprofit organisations in Nigeria.

According to one of the participants, “one of the challenges we face in the clamour for the implementation of these recommendations is inaccessibility to decision-makers, especially as the submission comes up around the same time as the primary elections.” Another participant also identified challenges of inadequate funding and unavailability of concrete data on human rights situations in the country as obstacles to the actualization of the goals.

However, many participants affirmed that the upcoming 2019 elections may serve as a veritable opportunity that civil society actors could leverage upon to assure that the challenges are mitigated.

Broad goals, targeted at ensuring that the Federal Government of Nigeria implements the 10 recommendations by October 2023 with the ultimate aim of achieving the promotion and protection of fundamental human rights in compliance with the international human rights obligation were aligned with specific objectives.

These objectives were identified as key to the actualization of the goal; such as, creation of public awareness on the 10 recommendations through the media and local community outreaches, strengthening the Nigerian UPR coalition by actively engaging civil society actors in the review process, liaising with the human rights committee at the legislative arm to ensure the amendment of relevant bills and ensuring that CSOs are engaged in the UPR process before the government submits its report.

REPORT OF NNNGO’S ACTIVITIES FOR THE FIRST QUARTER OF THE YEAR 2018

OVERVIEW OF CITIZENS’ REPORT SUPPORTED BY AFRICAN MONITOR

The Citizens Report is a shadow report based on citizen-driven monitoring of SDGs in seven African countries. It is a 3-year programme with a strong presence at the local, national and regional level. The project’s theory of change is that when citizens effectively hold their governments accountable for delivery, democracy is strengthened, development outcomes improve significantly for the poor, and citizens gain confidence to claim their rights and solve local problems.

Through the programme, a cohort of youth champions and civil society representatives will be trained and supported to collect citizen-generated data to monitor SDG implementation. Citizen monitoring tools used (i.e. the Governance Barometer and Citizens Hearings) will generate new qualitative data that will inform national and regional review processes.

The objective of the project is to; enhance the monitoring and review of the SDGs, facilitate policy change and improved delivery, and engage regional and global development institutions

NNNGO has ensured that a work plan on how the project will be carried out has been developed to aid implementation and monitor the progress of the work. Following this, the project was officially launched with call for application to recruit young Nigerians who would serve as Youth Champions. The call was released in January, 2018 and had 90 applicants from which four individuals were selected based on the quality of application.

In February 2018, these four individuals underwent trainings on how to conduct social research. Subsequently, three communities have been identified using purposive sampling technique and the principle of leave no one behind. Draft questions for the citizens’ hearing have been developed based on the area of interest and also putting their location and culture into perspective.

In the second quarter of the year, data gathering which includes citizens’ hearing and survey as well as analysis will commence.

OVERVIEW OF PACFaH@Scale SPONSORED BY dRPC

Partnership for Advocacy in Child and Family Health @Scale (PACFaH@Scale) is a health accountability project which supports the implementation of routine immunization financing strategy with emphasis and inclusion of the basic healthcare provision fund and improving allocation and timely releases of family planning funding in fulfilment of the state governments’ commitments.

The programme aims to conduct research and analysis on health policy and budget, identify significant policy targets, develop policy and issue briefs to share with policy makers, hold press conferences to educate the public and raise awareness as well as train NGOs and build capacity for evidence-based advocacy engagements.

In February 2018, copies of the 2017 Contraceptive Implementation Plan (CIP) for Routine Immunization (RI) in Lagos state were obtained for review, detailed review of CIP for Lagos State RI successfully carried out and a report developed. In addition, a report of baseline assessment of Family Plan (FP) policy and financial commitments was also developed.

A stakeholder-mapping engagement was held in March 2018 to identify RI and CIP-focused Civil Society Organisations (CSO) operational in Lagos. This was to identify issues and challenges that these organisations face in their work as well as factor out ways of bridging identified gaps in order to allow effective implementation of the project.

OVERVIEW OF THE “STRENGTHENING STATUTORY REGULATIONS FOR CIVIL SOCIETY ORGANISATIONS IN NIGERIA: AMENDING PART C OF CAMA” SUPPORTED BY COMMONWEALTH FOUNDATION (JAN-MAR):

Activities on implementation of the second phase of the Commonwealth Foundation project started on Jan 22nd to 26th 2018 with a civil society online campaign. This was done on the NNNGO social media platforms (Facebook and Twitter) for a period of one week with the participation of civil society actors who contributed observations and opinions on the amendment of the Act using #SuggestedAmendmentToCAMA.

The campaign generated questions on how Non-profits can file annual returns, the Part C of CAMA, insights and opinions to the amendment and provided an opportunity for interaction on how these issues can be effectively addressed.

On March, 22nd 2018, a letter was sent to the Corporate Affairs Commission informing them of the outcome of the campaign with details of contributions from civil society actors regarding annual returns. This was in a bid to help shape the Commission’s work especially in the review of the Part C of the CAMA in line with the present administration’s agenda for enabling ease of business.

Meetings with the National Assembly and the Corporate Affairs Commissions have also been scheduled to hold on the 24th of April 2018, the meetings will enable discussion on the review done by NNNGO and the recommendations sent to these regulatory agencies the previous year. Outcomes of these meeting would be shared with the members to update them for their review as well.

OVERVIEW OF THE EUROPEAN UNION PROJECT (JAN-MAR): “STRENGTHENING THE REGULATORY FRAMEWORK AND ENABLING ENVIRONMENT FOR A MORE ACCOUNTABLE AND TRANSPARENT CIVIL SOCIETY IN NIGERIA”.

The project was originally scheduled to undergo a 12-month implementation plan; however, a range of activities were delayed due to several bureaucratic delays regarding the project’s visibility plan. Despite this challenge, the project succeeded in planning and developing all tools, guides and templates needed to successfully achieve expected project outcomes.

The results achieved so far under this project contributed directly to improving the debate on NGO accountability and the need for a strengthened regulatory framework and enabling environment for a more accountable and transparent civil society in Nigeria, call for a self-regulatory framework by the sector and improved mechanism for cooperation between the sector and regulators.

In addition, the understanding and knowledge including direct linkage between the work of nonprofits, regulatory bottlenecks, weak compliance with existing regulations and restrictive laws has increased amongst stakeholders. Subsequently, regulators are now active in their oversight of the operations of nonprofits as is the case with the Special Control Unit on Money Laundering (SCUML) that now conduct on the spot regulatory checks on nonprofits in the country or the ongoing reform on the ease of doing business which captures nonprofit registration and filing of annual returns.

OVERVIEW OF LIFE-LINE GRANT

The Life-line grant aims to create awareness on the NGO regulatory bill as well as provide a platform for the portrayal of civil society views regarding the bill. In the first quarter of 2018, a shadow report of happenings at the Public Hearing on the NGO regulatory Bill conducted on Wednesday, 18th December, 2017 was developed.

In addition, discussions on social media, newspaper, TV and radio interviews about the bill were collated and developed into a “what we heard” report. Both reports were then published and circulated to the legislature. This aimed at bringing several voices on the bill to the notice of the legislatures with the hope that this will provide evidence on the public’s view of the bill.

In the next quarter, it is intended that a legislative campaign will begin.  The Campaign will target legislators through SMS and letter writing campaigns to inform the legislators on the benefits of non-profits and why they should support the call for the ‘death’ of bill 585.

The campaign will involve civil society organisations signing on letters and writing separate letters to representatives of communities where they work highlighting their impact and the danger that the passage of bill 585 portends for the communities they serve. It is also intended that letters will be written to various national and religious leaders, community heads, business leaders, police chiefs, local clergy, political figures asking them to make strong public statements on the need for the bill to be stepped down.

OVERVIEW OF THE CIVIC ENGAGEMENT ON THE FINANCIAL ACTION TASK FORCE (FATF) EVALUATION OF NIGERIA SUPPORTED BY OPEN SOCIETY INITIATIVE FOR WEST AFRICA,  

In the past 15 months, the Nigeria Network of NGOs (NNNGO), supported by the Open Society Initiative of West Africa (OSIWA), has embarked on a project to create space for effective engagement of the civil society organisations in the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) evaluation process for Nigeria.

To engage the civil society, NNNGO embarked on several activities such as:

Research on Nigerian laws that directly or indirectly, affect the ability of the non-profit sector to function effectively. A review of both the 2011 Money Laundering (ML) Prohibition Act and the draft Anti-Money Laundering (AML) bill submitted to the National Assembly by the Executive arm of the government.

Findings revealed that both the 2011 ML prohibition act and the draft AML bill in their current forms are contrary to the proportionate and targeted approach required by the revised FATF standards – Recommendation 8 and its Interpretative Note and discourage legitimate activities of NPOs.

In sensitizing civil society and the public about FATF, social media and web creatives were used to highlight the relevance of FATF Recommendation 8 to the work of Nigerian non-profits. Using Email, Facebook, Twitter, WhatsApp platforms and Short Message Services, series of FATF-focused messages were sent to over 2,377 non-profits on the NNNGO mailing list. Fifteen editions of the e-newsletter were produced and Six feature articles were published online and in print (Punch Newspaper).

The essence of these was to provide information on FATF, link its implications for Nigeria and the work of non-profits, understand the role of evaluation agencies such GIABA and the need for reforms of the AML/CFT regime amongst others. It was observed that some NPOs were not aware of the laws and agencies governing them, hence the need for this sensitization.

NNNGO was involved in engagement meetings with the National Risk Assessment Secretariat, National Assembly Committee on Civil Society and other stakeholders including the media.

These include: a meeting with the Special Adviser to the Senate President and the Clerk of the Senate Committee on Civil Society and Diaspora; meeting with the leadership of the Nigerian Financial Intelligence Unit – the focal government agency charged with the responsibility of complying with international standards on combating Money Laundering and Financing of Terrorism and proliferation; and the Special Control Unit against Money Laundering (SCUML)—the agency of government responsible for the implementation of the AML/CFT regime in Nigeria, among others.

The meetings were aimed at ensuring; that civil society engages in the upcoming mutual evaluation; the revised Recommendation 8 and its interpretation is properly implemented without targeting non-profits or shrinking civic space.

Part of the activities included the creation of an informal coalition of civil society organizations interested in working on FATF related issues. Membership of the coalition was open to all civil society organisations

interested in FATF and, NNNGO conducted two online and two physical meetings with the coalition members after its creation.

As part of efforts to connect with global efforts, NNNGO attended six online global NPO coalition on FAFTR8. It was an opportunity to learn and share best practices including building the Network’s capacity to engage well in country on FATF issues.

2 regional workshops were held in Lagos and Abuja on the 19th and 26th February 2018 respectively with 135 participants from 14 states of the country attending in total.

Organised in partnership with SCUML, the workshop has its central theme as ‘’effective implementation of AML/CFT requirements in the NPO sector in Nigeria.

The project was rounded off with a sector-wide conference organised by NNNGO, in partnership with SCUML. The conference was held on 28th March 2018 in Lagos. It was themed “Implementation of AML/CFT Standards for the Non-Profit Organizations (NPOs) Sector in Nigeria” and had in attendance over 200 participants drawn from the civil society community, SCUML, NFIU, NNNGO staff and the media.

The result of these activities has further strengthened the relationship and partnership with regulators (SCUML and NFIU). Also, it has to a large extent, improved the consciousness of civil society organisations on the AML/CFT regime in Nigeria.

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS IN NIGERIA; TWO YEARS AND COUNTING…

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS IN NIGERIA; TWO YEARS AND COUNTING…

On the 2nd years Anniversary of the SDGs, Ms. Oyindamola Aramide shares her thoughts in this article.

On September 25, 2015, the United Nations general assembly adopted 17-interconnected goals which form the universal, integrated and transformative 2030 Agenda for sustainable development. 193 member nations of the United Nations; Nigeria inclusive formally took on implementation of these global goals in the year 2016 with hopes of full attainment in every country by 2030.

The 17 goals, alternatively referred to as global goals are further broken down into 169 specific targets which fundamentally lean on three crucial domains of environment, economy and society. Each of the goals has a stake in one of these domains with the ultimate goal of ensuring inclusive development for everyone in every city of the world through the mitigation and subsequent eradication of poverty, reduction of hunger and food waste, creation of enabling environments for growth and development, protection of the planet and so on.

One major challenge to the attainment of the SDGs in many countries is the lack of awareness and inadequate sensitization of the public of the goals, what they entail and how their implantation impacts the quality of life of the average citizen. In Nigeria, studies show that more than 50% of the population is unaware of what the sustainable development goals are or how they affect their own development. How then can these goals be achieved if people do not know about them or how they fit into the implementation of the goals.

Two years into the adoption of the goals, there is still more to be done in terms of sensitizing people about each of the seventeen goals and how they can be fitted into citizens’ lives on a daily basis. First of all, we have to ask ourselves as well as our governments if the goals are even achievable so that enquiries into them do not put us in an offensive position (them on the defensive), where it is obvious that the government is inundated by the sheer magnitude of all that have to be accomplished in the next thirteen years. At this point in the implementation of the SDGs, it becomes imperative that questions which interrogate our governments’ commitment to the promises made in September 2015.

Liu Zhenmin, Under Secretary- General of the United Nations and head of its Department of Economic and Social Affairs noted that; “Successful implementation of the SDGs is predicated on people knowing about them. If people are aware of the bold commitments their leaders made in 2015, then citizens can hold their leaders accountable.”

As much as the attainment of the SDGs is prominent in the framework of world nations and strongly backed by the United Nations, Agenda 2030 cannot simply be actualized by increasing awareness and sensitizations. It is important to note that the SDGs only stand a chance at being achieved if everyone takes a part in the implementation. National, state and local governments, the private sector, the academia, civil society as well as average everyday citizens all have a stake at achieving Agenda 2030.

When citizens are engaged in a process especially founded on issues which affect them on personal levels, they would be inclined to act. People which make up a country have high population power (in comparison with those in power) and so the contribution of everyone to issues of development in ways which they find relatable is important to foster implementation of the SDGs for the next thirteen years.

Governments have the prerogative to ensure that people understand that they play a large role in taking up actions especially regarding identifying one particular goal which speaks to them the most, connecting it all on how best the other goals can be achieved.

Education is key to engendering inclusivity and a core goal for being ahead of the curve on a lot of changes. It cannot be denied that the entry point to conversations on the SDGs is goal 4; quality education. It is through the actualization of quality education that poverty can be eradicated and then zero hunger can be achieved.

The greatest challenge to quality education in achieving sustainable development lies in the conflict between the federal, state and local governments in the management of education at these different levels. The problems range from lack of adequate funding of the sector to politicization of the system, indiscipline to general instability of the sector. According to UNESCO, 26% of national budgets are to be allocated to education in each country but it is cannot be said that this is the case in Nigeria and has not been so for many years now. The onus is on the government to revitalize the educational system in the country and provide sustainable funding for the educational sector to achieve the vision of quality education for all by 2030.

Climate change and how human activities lead up to the situation where environmental degradation causes an inability of the environment to sustain life is another area intended to be tackled by the SDGs. It is time to begin to educate people on the importance of sustainable use of nature’s resources in a way that these resources are not used up faster than they can be replenished.

Urbanization and rapid expansion of cities which results in destruction of vegetation and farmlands, release of hazardous chemicals into the atmosphere; another result of massive industrialization, engaging in actions which further jeopardizes the ozone layer; causing a ripple effect on land and sea temperature leading to recent occurrence of massive flooding of many cities around the world, hurricanes and the environment essentially lashing back at the unsustainable use of its resources. These are some of the issues that need to be addressed but cannot simply be achieved solely by government.

Government has to educate people on these errors and while actions have to be taken by all which including everyone making better choices on how best to engage the use of environment resources to forestall irreversible danger.

With partnership and the support of stakeholders on all levels in the society as well as the commitment of all citizens to the attainment of the goals, the government has to brace up to the challenge of delivering on its promise to lead the movement.

Policies which engender peaceful living and create a society which absorbs and spreads development must be enacted, a society which is ideal for global partnership and inclusive development must be created; one devoid of mutual distrust, chaos and violence in order for Nigeria to stand a chance at sustainable development in the long-term.

Nigeria Presents National Voluntary Report at HLPF 2017

Nigeria Presents National Voluntary Report at HLPF 2017

I wish to reaffirm that Nigeria has clearly defined her part on the 2030 agenda – Adefulire says as Nigeria presents at the United Nations

NEW YORK — Nigeria has made progress in integrating the SDGs into its national plans, participants at the United Nations High Level Political Forum on the SDGs were made to know by the Senior Special Adviser to the President on the SDGs- Princess Adejoke Orelope –Adefulire. She told delegates how Nigeria has “taken active steps to mainstream the 2030 agenda into its national, state and sectorial policy plan and budget”.  She noted that the country has also “commenced work on the need assessment, policy and scenario analysis, indicator capturing as well as tracking and reporting” of the SDGs.

The scene on the evening of Wednesday 18th July at the UN in New York was diplomatic and high level as Sweden, Nigeria and Panama (in that order) presented their voluntary national reports (NVR) to a room full of government delegations from all the UN member states, civil society and private sector.

In 2015, Nigeria joined other countries of the world to agree an agenda to sustainably develop and protect people and planet, it would take them fifteen years costing trillions within a stable economy. The recession witnessed by Nigeria as triggered by global oil crisis and terrorism has impacted “our collective aspiration to address the numerous challenges confronting the poor and vulnerable in our society. For us in Nigeria, the humanitarian crisis in the North –East and the persistent militancy in the Niger-Delta has further slowed us down in our drive to implement the SDGs in Nigeria’’ stated Adefulire in her NVR remarks to the UN. Despite these challenges, she is confident that “Nigeria has clearly defined her part on the 2030 agenda”.

Speaking directly from New York to the NNNGO news website, Oyebisi. B. Oluseyi, Executive Director, Nigeria Network of NGOs said that the High level political forum was established in 2013 to act as the recognized home for sustainable development governance within the United Nations system. It is the pre-eminent body in the international framework for sustainable development and will ultimately be responsible for the implementation and monitoring of the 2030 agenda on sustainable development goals.

“The Nigerian Government is to be commended for providing the space for civil society and the private sector to make input into the country’s voluntary report and to join the Senior Special Adviser to the President on the SDG’s in making presentations to the UN on the country’s SDG’s interventions” Oyebisi stated.

“Through the 100 pages report submitted by the Nigerian Government we have seen the strides made by the Buhari Administration, the challenges and gaps that needs to be addressed. Now is the time for civil society to get more organized in working with government to ensure the 2030 agenda becomes achievable and that the Civil Society Advisory Group on the SDGs is strengthened to provide the space for civil society’s engagement in the design and implementation of quality programmes and projects that can aid the delivery of sustainable development to all corners of the country without “leaving anyone behind”.

The High Level Political Forum on the SDGs was held from 10-19 July 2017.

 

End

NNNGO ORGANISES CAPACITY-BUILDING WORKSHOP ON FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

NNNGO ORGANISES CAPACITY-BUILDING WORKSHOP ON FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

The Nigeria Network of NGOs (NNNGO), on Friday, 16th June 2017, organised a capacity-building workshop themed; Managing your Financial Resources for Easy Organizational Tracking, Regulatory Compliance and Donor Reporting.

Thirty-Two Heads of Nonprofit Organisations operational in Lagos state, convened at Our Lady of Apostle, St. Agnes, Maryland, Lagos to participate in the training which was targeted at equipping Nigerian Nonprofits with skills on how to manage their finances in line with global best practices.

The Executive Director, NNNGO, Mr Oyebisi B. Oluseyi in his opening remarks underscored the importance of having a foolproof finance system and urged participants to utilize the opportunity presented at the event to learn skills that will help boost their organizational structures. He added that the workshop was organised in line with the mandate of NNNGO which is to sensitize Nigerian Nonprofits on issues relating to financial crimes and how it currently affects the third sector in order to ensure that Nonprofits are not being used as conduits for money laundering and terrorism financing.

The Finance and Membership Officer, Mr. Timothy Odion who drove discussion during the workshop, pointed out that the finance and record-keeping system imbibed by NNNGO has been certified and proven ideal by International civil-based organizations. He, therefore, noted that it the system would serve as a model for tutoring participants at the workshop.

Mr. Odion said, “In order to engender an enviable organizational structure, nonprofits must understand the process of building and maintaining strong financial systems, organizing internal and external governance, as well as display competence in resource management and strategic planning”

The central point of focus at the training was the need to set up finance departments independent of all other departments within a Nonprofit organisation. The finance department within such organizations should be headed by a competent finance person who preferably has undergone trainings in areas related to bookkeeping, finance, and accounting or has adequate knowledge in the area and can prove it. This they noted, is key to the success of an organisation and elicits donor trust. It is also important to ensure that these systems are in place especially as donors and/or regulatory agencies require these qualifications to certify it transparent.

Some of the highlights at the workshop were sessions specifically targeted at Treating Budgets, Networking, Collaboration and Partnerships within the sector. Participants were taken through courses on how to draw up organisational as well as project budgets.

An organisational budget refers to a financial plan for a defined period for which all organisational expenditure and activities are included. This is separate from a project budget which is specifically set aside for the implementation of a particular course. It is imperative to keep these budgets separate in order to ensure transparency and accountability within the system.

The importance of documenting every activity carried out within an NGO was also emphasized at the workshop. Participants were urged to ensure that every activity is documented separately and regardless of the source of funding in an organization, the finance officer is charged with the duty of documenting all financial activities.

For organisations which are self-funded, it was noted that a separate account be opened in the name of the organisation, this is where money set aside for the operation of the organisation will be kept and disbursed. It was noted that organisations run into problems with regulatory agencies due to the inability to present proof of transparent dealings because appropriate records of accounts were not kept and so ensuring separate budgets and separate accounts are ways of mitigating these risks.

Mr. Odion and his team noted that, in doing all these, it will be easy to get the accounts of organisations audited which will help during application for grants from international donors.  Ultimately, strict adherence to rules presents an organization as focused, detail-oriented, accountable and transparent in its actions which better equips it for engagements with organizations of international standards.

Strengthening Civic Participation around the Globe: Methods of Effective Campaigning.

Strengthening Civic Participation around the Globe: Methods of Effective Campaigning.

On May 9, 2017, the Civic Charter stakeholders’ workshop began in Kilimanjaro, Tanzania. The three-day workshop which was facilitated by Burkhard Gnärig of the International Civil Society Centre, Germany and Uyga Özesmi from Good4Trust.org in Turkey was aimed at developing a joint Civic Charter campaign to strengthen civic participation around the globe.

Organized as the starting point for a long term campaign for civic participation, the workshop brought together 25 campaigners from 13 countries that deliberated on issues relating to the shrinkage of civic space while exchanging information on how it is experienced at the local level in their different countries.

Participants at the workshop were introduced with particular emphasis on their work on civil rights and involvement with the Civic Charter while a brief history and glimpse ahead of the Civic Charter movement with view to further development was presented.

The workshop also featured a presentation by Uyga Özesmi of Good4Trust.org on the methods of effective campaigning which focused on developing action for tangible outcomes. Participants were thereafter divided into Country/National groups to design a national campaign by using the Civic Charter; problems as well as areas where concrete change can be made were identified and a power analysis of all national stakeholders with regards to the problem identified was undertaken in view of and identifying targets and developing a campaign.

During afternoon sessions, participants were involved in activities which highlighted the importance of using the Civic Charter as a basis for campaigns and making best use of the Civic Charter in civil activities.

Another highlight of the workshop was a meeting held by participants where they discussed what a “global” Civic Charter promotion campaign should look like, identified tactics that need to be further explored and precautionary measures to be adopted to ensure their own safety. It was agreed that:

  • The International Civil Society Centre (ICSC) will take forward the idea of a viral global campaign in conjunction with other digital ideas for promoting the Civic Charter internationally. The Centre will bring in activists from a range of countries to provide advice on the best approaches for reaching a global community.
  • The Centre will choose a date for a “Civic Charter Day” and communicate plans for that day to the community.

Some of the outcomes of the workshop include the acknowledgement of the capacity of the Civic Charter to be used as an empowerment tool to tackle local issues and as an advocacy instrument during engagements with local and National authorities

A recurring message at the workshop is the need to protect and expand the civil society as an important local, national, regional and global movement to combat corruption in all the countries of the world.  Development partners and the civil society organizations were also advised to resist the deliberate encroachment by various national governments on the civic space by the introduction of obnoxious bills which are meant to curtail CSOs freedom of expression, freedom of information, freedom of assembly & freedom of association.

 

 

 

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IS NOT CHARITY

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IS NOT CHARITY

Students of the Centre for Sustainable Development, University of Ibadan and Civil Society Organizations were in attendance at the Nigeria Network of NGOs/Center for Sustainable Development seminar, themed Development in Practice: Advancing your career in sustainable development which was held on Friday, 26th May, 2016 at Bodija, Ibadan.

Guest speaker at the seminar, Ms. Crystal Chigbu noted that sustainable development is about giving everything of oneself to society as often as the society requires it. She debunked the notion that sustainable development is simply about charity, saying that there have been misconceptions about sustainable development such that many individuals erroneously think working towards the sustainable development goals simply involves charitable deeds or revenue-making for the purpose of funding NGOs. She noted the importance of disabusing this belief, claiming that it encompasses much more. According to her sustainable development is about innovation and transforming your society in your own way to make impact.

Ms.  Chigbu said impact can be effectively made when a practitioner finds a focus within the SDGs and diligently pursues it. She elaborates on this by stating the importance of adopting four sustainable keys for practice which she labelled, ‘the Irede Model’; Passion, Picture, Pursuing and Impact. The place of passion, she said, cannot be overemphasized as it is the driving force of one’s career and it is through passion that a picture can be effectively pursued to make impact.

She lauded the effectiveness of these keys and attributed the success of her practice to them while noting they help in building and advancing one’s career in development practice. She further added that to build a successful career in sustainable development practice, it is imperative that a practitioner finds a firm placing within the seventeen Sustainable Development Goals as there is the need for practitioners to familiarise themselves with the goals and join the work towards ensuring an orange (happy) world by 2030.

An interactive session followed where participants tabled problematic areas in development practice.

The seminar featured a panel session by volunteers of the Nigeria Network of NGOs who presented reports of their experience with the Network, answered questions pertaining to their areas of expertise and generally gave updates on the projects handled by the Network while they commended the Network for the opportunity it presented in the area of capacity building. The four outgone interns who now serve as volunteers for the Network also noted the importance of being well informed about the civil society sector and enjoined CSOs to take it upon themselves to find out as much as they can about the sector in order to better protect it against unfavourable laws and practices.

The seminar is the second in the series organized by a joint effort of the Nigeria Network of NGOs and the Center for Sustainable Development and focuses on enhancing human capacity development for achieving sustainable development.

NNNGO AND CESDEV ORGANIZE CAREER ADVANCEMENT SEMINAR

NNNGO AND CESDEV ORGANIZE CAREER ADVANCEMENT SEMINAR

NNNGO AND CESDEV ORGANIZE CAREER ADVANCEMENT SEMINAR.  

By Oyindamola Aramide, Communications Officer, Nigeria Network of NGOs.

As part of efforts to boost the employability status of young Nigerians and ensure the overall growth of the development practice in the country, The Nigeria Network of NGOs, (NNNGO) in conjunction with Center for Sustainable Development (CESDEV), University of Ibadan is organizing a seminar themed, “Development in Practice; Advancing Your Career in Sustainable Development”.

The seminar is the second event in the seminar series of the partnership between the Network and the Center for Sustainable Development, University of Ibadan; it is targeted at nonprofits as well as young and upcoming development practitioners and is geared towards capacity building and career advancement in the development sector.

“Everywhere in the world, there is the idea of the society (town) having symbiotic relationship with the university (gown). But this symbiotic interaction remains in theory for most institutions in Nigeria. Thankfully, the Development Practice Programme of the Centre for Sustainable Development, University of Ibadan, Nigeria is blazing the trail, having signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Nigeria Network of NGOs to implement a workable town and gown collaboration which focuses on enhancing human capacity development for achieving sustainable development through joint conferences, internships and seminars”, said Dr. Olawale Olayide, Coordinator, Development Practice Programme, Center for Sustainable Development, University of Ibadan.

For us as Nigeria Network of NGOs, this is an opportunity to give back to society by ensuring that young individuals who intend to build careers in sustainable development practice get insights from the field to complement what is learnt in the classroom” noted the Executive Director, Nigeria Network of NGOs, Mr. Oyebisi B. Oluseyi.

“The seminar series is part of the commitment of the Network to ensuring the attainment of the Sustainable Development Goals. The first of the series, themed, “Leave No One Behind” was held in September 2016 and had in attendance students of the Center for Sustainable Development as well as civil society organisations and the media”, said Sulaimon Oluwatosin, a Postgraduate Student of the Center for Sustainable Development and Volunteer at the Nigeria Network of NGOs who was a participant at the first event held in 2016.

“Leave no one behind” a slogan coined from the SDGs narrative, is aimed at ensuring an inclusive and encompassing approach to the attainment of the goals by 2030.

The event is scheduled to hold on Friday, May 26, 2017 at CESDEV Suite, 20, Awolowo Avenue, Old Bodija, Ibadan, Nigeria at 10:00am prompt. The event is expected to gather around 100 participants and will feature a presentation by Ms. Crystal Olasumbo Chigbu, the Executive Director and Founder of the IREDE Foundation and a successful development expert.

CONTACT

For more information, please contact

Oyindamola Aramide, Communications Officer, Nigeria Network of NGOs,

151, Akowonjo Road, Egbeda Lagos,

Phone Number: 07065160956

Email Address: nnngo@nnngo.org

Twitter: @nnngo

Facebook: Nigeria Network of NGOs

Website: www.nnngo.org

PRESS RELEASE: NIGERIA NETWORK OF NGOS (NNNGO) LAUNCHES NEW WEBSITE

PRESS RELEASE: NIGERIA NETWORK OF NGOS (NNNGO) LAUNCHES NEW WEBSITE

The Nigeria Network of NGOs on May 3, 2017 officially launched its new and highly technologically advanced website. The launch which is part of the Network’s list of achievable for the year 2017 comes at a particularly crucial time as it is set to usher in more exciting changes and improvement for and from the Network.

The new website which is outfitted with aesthetically pleasing views of events organized by the Network in recent times also features a New logo which heralds the upcoming twenty-fifth anniversary, Menus which comprise items ranging from information about previous conferences held by the organization, News on various happenings, Resources as well as information on Membership and the YRK Award.

There is the inclusion of an announcement section which is intended to contain information on minor and major events the Network would be engaged in henceforth. Amazing multimedia features, policy and project updates as well as polls and surveys are part of some of the additions to the website to enable members and the general public is privy to the inner workings of the Nigeria Network of NGOs.

About the Nigeria Network of NGOs

The Nigeria Network of NGOs is the first generic membership body for civil society organizations in Nigeria that facilitates effective advocacy on issues of poverty and other developmental issues.

The Network was established in August 1992 by 60 representatives of non-governmental organizations across Nigeria as part of efforts to combat challenges facing the operation of civil society organizations in Nigeria. Currently, it represents over one thousand and eight hundred organizations ranging from small group working at the local levels to larger networks working at the national level.

Contacts

For more information, please contact

Oyindamola Aramide; Communications Officer, Nigeria Network of NGOs,

151, Akwonjo Road, Egbeda Lagos,

Phone Number: 07065160956.

Email Address: nnngo@nnngo.org

Twitter: @nnngo

Facebook: Nigeria Network of NGOs

Website: www.nnngo.org