Category: News

Nigeria Presents National Voluntary Report at HLPF 2017

Nigeria Presents National Voluntary Report at HLPF 2017

I wish to reaffirm that Nigeria has clearly defined her part on the 2030 agenda – Adefulire says as Nigeria presents at the United Nations

NEW YORK — Nigeria has made progress in integrating the SDGs into its national plans, participants at the United Nations High Level Political Forum on the SDGs were made to know by the Senior Special Adviser to the President on the SDGs- Princess Adejoke Orelope –Adefulire. She told delegates how Nigeria has “taken active steps to mainstream the 2030 agenda into its national, state and sectorial policy plan and budget”.  She noted that the country has also “commenced work on the need assessment, policy and scenario analysis, indicator capturing as well as tracking and reporting” of the SDGs.

The scene on the evening of Wednesday 18th July at the UN in New York was diplomatic and high level as Sweden, Nigeria and Panama (in that order) presented their voluntary national reports (NVR) to a room full of government delegations from all the UN member states, civil society and private sector.

In 2015, Nigeria joined other countries of the world to agree an agenda to sustainably develop and protect people and planet, it would take them fifteen years costing trillions within a stable economy. The recession witnessed by Nigeria as triggered by global oil crisis and terrorism has impacted “our collective aspiration to address the numerous challenges confronting the poor and vulnerable in our society. For us in Nigeria, the humanitarian crisis in the North –East and the persistent militancy in the Niger-Delta has further slowed us down in our drive to implement the SDGs in Nigeria’’ stated Adefulire in her NVR remarks to the UN. Despite these challenges, she is confident that “Nigeria has clearly defined her part on the 2030 agenda”.

Speaking directly from New York to the NNNGO news website, Oyebisi. B. Oluseyi, Executive Director, Nigeria Network of NGOs said that the High level political forum was established in 2013 to act as the recognized home for sustainable development governance within the United Nations system. It is the pre-eminent body in the international framework for sustainable development and will ultimately be responsible for the implementation and monitoring of the 2030 agenda on sustainable development goals.

“The Nigerian Government is to be commended for providing the space for civil society and the private sector to make input into the country’s voluntary report and to join the Senior Special Adviser to the President on the SDG’s in making presentations to the UN on the country’s SDG’s interventions” Oyebisi stated.

“Through the 100 pages report submitted by the Nigerian Government we have seen the strides made by the Buhari Administration, the challenges and gaps that needs to be addressed. Now is the time for civil society to get more organized in working with government to ensure the 2030 agenda becomes achievable and that the Civil Society Advisory Group on the SDGs is strengthened to provide the space for civil society’s engagement in the design and implementation of quality programmes and projects that can aid the delivery of sustainable development to all corners of the country without “leaving anyone behind”.

The High Level Political Forum on the SDGs was held from 10-19 July 2017.

 

End

Nigerians Speak Up on Internet Rights

“We want an internet where everyone can create jobs and expand employment opportunities.” This demand was among many messages shared on social media during the #WebWeWantNG campaign led by A4AI-Nigeria coalition members as championed by the Nigeria Network of NGOs​.

Held on June 14th, the campaign aimed to encourage citizens to contribute their input to the Nigerian Communications Commission’s stakeholder consultation on an Internet Industry Code of Practice.  

Catch up on the conversation and Nigerians’ vision for an open internet on #WebWeWantNG. You can also review the coalition’s submission to the NCC at http://bit.ly/2tFH1iF

Strengthening Civic Participation around the Globe: Methods of Effective Campaigning.

Strengthening Civic Participation around the Globe: Methods of Effective Campaigning.

On May 9, 2017, the Civic Charter stakeholders’ workshop began in Kilimanjaro, Tanzania. The three-day workshop which was facilitated by Burkhard Gnärig of the International Civil Society Centre, Germany and Uyga Özesmi from Good4Trust.org in Turkey was aimed at developing a joint Civic Charter campaign to strengthen civic participation around the globe.

Organized as the starting point for a long term campaign for civic participation, the workshop brought together 25 campaigners from 13 countries that deliberated on issues relating to the shrinkage of civic space while exchanging information on how it is experienced at the local level in their different countries.

Participants at the workshop were introduced with particular emphasis on their work on civil rights and involvement with the Civic Charter while a brief history and glimpse ahead of the Civic Charter movement with view to further development was presented.

The workshop also featured a presentation by Uyga Özesmi of Good4Trust.org on the methods of effective campaigning which focused on developing action for tangible outcomes. Participants were thereafter divided into Country/National groups to design a national campaign by using the Civic Charter; problems as well as areas where concrete change can be made were identified and a power analysis of all national stakeholders with regards to the problem identified was undertaken in view of and identifying targets and developing a campaign.

During afternoon sessions, participants were involved in activities which highlighted the importance of using the Civic Charter as a basis for campaigns and making best use of the Civic Charter in civil activities.

Another highlight of the workshop was a meeting held by participants where they discussed what a “global” Civic Charter promotion campaign should look like, identified tactics that need to be further explored and precautionary measures to be adopted to ensure their own safety. It was agreed that:

  • The International Civil Society Centre (ICSC) will take forward the idea of a viral global campaign in conjunction with other digital ideas for promoting the Civic Charter internationally. The Centre will bring in activists from a range of countries to provide advice on the best approaches for reaching a global community.
  • The Centre will choose a date for a “Civic Charter Day” and communicate plans for that day to the community.

Some of the outcomes of the workshop include the acknowledgement of the capacity of the Civic Charter to be used as an empowerment tool to tackle local issues and as an advocacy instrument during engagements with local and National authorities

A recurring message at the workshop is the need to protect and expand the civil society as an important local, national, regional and global movement to combat corruption in all the countries of the world.  Development partners and the civil society organizations were also advised to resist the deliberate encroachment by various national governments on the civic space by the introduction of obnoxious bills which are meant to curtail CSOs freedom of expression, freedom of information, freedom of assembly & freedom of association.

 

 

 

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IS NOT CHARITY

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IS NOT CHARITY

Students of the Centre for Sustainable Development, University of Ibadan and Civil Society Organizations were in attendance at the Nigeria Network of NGOs/Center for Sustainable Development seminar, themed Development in Practice: Advancing your career in sustainable development which was held on Friday, 26th May, 2016 at Bodija, Ibadan.

Guest speaker at the seminar, Ms. Crystal Chigbu noted that sustainable development is about giving everything of oneself to society as often as the society requires it. She debunked the notion that sustainable development is simply about charity, saying that there have been misconceptions about sustainable development such that many individuals erroneously think working towards the sustainable development goals simply involves charitable deeds or revenue-making for the purpose of funding NGOs. She noted the importance of disabusing this belief, claiming that it encompasses much more. According to her sustainable development is about innovation and transforming your society in your own way to make impact.

Ms.  Chigbu said impact can be effectively made when a practitioner finds a focus within the SDGs and diligently pursues it. She elaborates on this by stating the importance of adopting four sustainable keys for practice which she labelled, ‘the Irede Model’; Passion, Picture, Pursuing and Impact. The place of passion, she said, cannot be overemphasized as it is the driving force of one’s career and it is through passion that a picture can be effectively pursued to make impact.

She lauded the effectiveness of these keys and attributed the success of her practice to them while noting they help in building and advancing one’s career in development practice. She further added that to build a successful career in sustainable development practice, it is imperative that a practitioner finds a firm placing within the seventeen Sustainable Development Goals as there is the need for practitioners to familiarise themselves with the goals and join the work towards ensuring an orange (happy) world by 2030.

An interactive session followed where participants tabled problematic areas in development practice.

The seminar featured a panel session by volunteers of the Nigeria Network of NGOs who presented reports of their experience with the Network, answered questions pertaining to their areas of expertise and generally gave updates on the projects handled by the Network while they commended the Network for the opportunity it presented in the area of capacity building. The four outgone interns who now serve as volunteers for the Network also noted the importance of being well informed about the civil society sector and enjoined CSOs to take it upon themselves to find out as much as they can about the sector in order to better protect it against unfavourable laws and practices.

The seminar is the second in the series organized by a joint effort of the Nigeria Network of NGOs and the Center for Sustainable Development and focuses on enhancing human capacity development for achieving sustainable development.

NNNGO AND CESDEV ORGANIZE CAREER ADVANCEMENT SEMINAR

NNNGO AND CESDEV ORGANIZE CAREER ADVANCEMENT SEMINAR

NNNGO AND CESDEV ORGANIZE CAREER ADVANCEMENT SEMINAR.  

By Oyindamola Aramide, Communications Officer, Nigeria Network of NGOs.

As part of efforts to boost the employability status of young Nigerians and ensure the overall growth of the development practice in the country, The Nigeria Network of NGOs, (NNNGO) in conjunction with Center for Sustainable Development (CESDEV), University of Ibadan is organizing a seminar themed, “Development in Practice; Advancing Your Career in Sustainable Development”.

The seminar is the second event in the seminar series of the partnership between the Network and the Center for Sustainable Development, University of Ibadan; it is targeted at nonprofits as well as young and upcoming development practitioners and is geared towards capacity building and career advancement in the development sector.

“Everywhere in the world, there is the idea of the society (town) having symbiotic relationship with the university (gown). But this symbiotic interaction remains in theory for most institutions in Nigeria. Thankfully, the Development Practice Programme of the Centre for Sustainable Development, University of Ibadan, Nigeria is blazing the trail, having signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Nigeria Network of NGOs to implement a workable town and gown collaboration which focuses on enhancing human capacity development for achieving sustainable development through joint conferences, internships and seminars”, said Dr. Olawale Olayide, Coordinator, Development Practice Programme, Center for Sustainable Development, University of Ibadan.

For us as Nigeria Network of NGOs, this is an opportunity to give back to society by ensuring that young individuals who intend to build careers in sustainable development practice get insights from the field to complement what is learnt in the classroom” noted the Executive Director, Nigeria Network of NGOs, Mr. Oyebisi B. Oluseyi.

“The seminar series is part of the commitment of the Network to ensuring the attainment of the Sustainable Development Goals. The first of the series, themed, “Leave No One Behind” was held in September 2016 and had in attendance students of the Center for Sustainable Development as well as civil society organisations and the media”, said Sulaimon Oluwatosin, a Postgraduate Student of the Center for Sustainable Development and Volunteer at the Nigeria Network of NGOs who was a participant at the first event held in 2016.

“Leave no one behind” a slogan coined from the SDGs narrative, is aimed at ensuring an inclusive and encompassing approach to the attainment of the goals by 2030.

The event is scheduled to hold on Friday, May 26, 2017 at CESDEV Suite, 20, Awolowo Avenue, Old Bodija, Ibadan, Nigeria at 10:00am prompt. The event is expected to gather around 100 participants and will feature a presentation by Ms. Crystal Olasumbo Chigbu, the Executive Director and Founder of the IREDE Foundation and a successful development expert.

CONTACT

For more information, please contact

Oyindamola Aramide, Communications Officer, Nigeria Network of NGOs,

151, Akowonjo Road, Egbeda Lagos,

Phone Number: 07065160956

Email Address: nnngo@nnngo.org

Twitter: @nnngo

Facebook: Nigeria Network of NGOs

Website: www.nnngo.org

Kicking Out Malaria

Kicking Out Malaria

As the world celebrates the world malaria day, our Communications Officer Olaife Ilori provides staggering statistics and updates on the progress made so far to build a malaria free world.

One of the Sustainable Development Goals is to ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages and in keeping up with this goal THE MOSQUITOES are thus making it seemingly impossible with their overtly schemed route to ensuring that this one goal does not see the light of day.

Malaria is a life-threatening blood disease caused by parasites transmitted to humans through the bite of the Anopheles mosquito. Once an infected mosquito bites a human and transmits the parasites, those parasites multiply in the host’s liver before infecting and destroying red blood cells.

When an infected mosquito bites a human host, the parasite enters the bloodstream and lays dormant within the liver. For the next 5 to 16 days, the host will show no symptoms but the malaria parasite will begin multiplying asexually. The new malaria parasites are then released into the bloodstream when the red blood cells are infected and begin to multiply again. Some malaria parasites, however, remain in the liver and are not released until later, resulting in recurrence upon an unaffected mosquito being infected once it feeds on an infected individual, and the cycle begins again with the readied symptoms which include cold sensation, shivering, fever, headaches, vomiting, sweats followed by a return to normal temperature, with tiredness.

Globally, an estimated 214 million cases of malaria occur annually and 3.2 billion people are at risk of infection. Approximately 438,000 deaths were attributed to malaria in 2015, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, where an estimated 90% of all malaria deaths occur. Upon this record, malaria remains still one of the most severe global public health problems worldwide, particularly in Africa, where Nigeria has the greatest number of malaria cases.

Nigeria, suffering from the world’s greatest malaria burden, with approximately 51 million cases and 207,000 deaths reported annually (approximately 30% of the total malaria burden in Africa), while 97% of the total population (roughly 173 million) is at risk of massive infection. Malaria accounts for 60% of outpatient visits to hospitals which always lead to 11% maternal mortality and 30% child mortality, especially among children less than 5 years. This devastating disease affects the country’s economic productivity, resulting in an estimated monetary loss of about 132 billion Naira in treatment costs, prevention, and other indirect costs.

Since 2000, malaria prevention has played an important role in reducing cases and deaths, primarily through the scale up of insecticide-treated nets and indoor spraying with insecticides. In 2008, the National Malaria Control Programme (NMCP) in Nigeria adopted a specific plan, the goal of which is to reduce 50% of the malaria burden by 2013 by achieving at least 80% coverage of long-lasting mosquito nets together with other measures, such as 20% of houses in targeted areas receiving Indoor Residual Spraying (IRS), and treatment with two doses of intermittent preventative therapy (IPT) for pregnant women who visit antenatal care clinics. To this effect, the percentage of households with at least one mosquito nets increased to over 70% by 2010, compared to 5% in 2008 with a high rate coming from Kano State, North Central Nigeria.

While in 2015 across other parts of Sub Saharan Africa, an estimated 53% of the population at risk reportedly slept under a treated net compared to 30% in 2010 together with the preventive treatment for pregnant woman.

malaria

According to the latest estimates from WHO, many countries with ongoing malaria transmission have reduced their disease burden significantly. On a global scale, new malaria cases fell by 21% between 2010 and 2015, the death rates fell by 29%. Be that as it may, the pace of progress must be greatly accelerated upon this, WHO’s Global Technical Strategy for Malaria has thus called for a 40% reduction in malaria cases and deaths by 90% by year 2030, compared to the 2015 estimation.

2017 is recording a slow and steady progress as it were and with this year’s global theme which is End Malaria for Good, it is indeed hoped that Malaria will be ended for good.

Letter to Members: Actions taken by the Nigeria Network of NGOs on the NGO Regulatory Commission Bill

Letter to Members: Actions taken by the Nigeria Network of NGOs on the NGO Regulatory Commission Bill

Dear Colleague – –

I am writing to update you on actions we have taken and next steps on the various bills at the National Assembly seeking to regulate the NGO sector.

As your Network, we have written to Hon Umar Buba Jubril, sponsor of the Non-Governmental Organisations Regulatory Commission Bill (HB585), see copy of the letter at http://nnngo.org/nnngo/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/Letter-to-Hon-Jubril.zip. In the letter we corrected some misconceptions about our sector as noticed in Hon Jubril’s legislative brief to the House of Representatives on bill HB585.

We also wrote to the House Committee Chair on Civil Society and Donor Agencies—letter can be read at http://nnngo.org/nnngo/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/House-Committee-Chair.zip. Recall the Bill is now at the Committee stage. We have written to the Committee Chair to ensure that a public hearing is held on the bill.

In order to create awareness on the bill, NNNGO’s Executive Director wrote a piece in Punch Newspapers and it can be seen at http://punchng.com/lawmakers-attempt-regulating-civil-society/

We have started a clause by clause technical analysis of the bill with a view to sharing with the National Assembly and other stakeholders our findings. You will receive copies as soon as this is ready. We anticipate a meeting between the Network and sponsors of the various bills soon.

From Monday 15th August 2016, we will start a National Week of Action on the bill with the aim of sensitizing our sector and the general public on contents of the bill. We will share with you our social media tool kit on this shortly.

We can’t stress enough how important your voice is in determining the future of our sector. With a lot of important work to do in protecting and strengthening an enabling environment for our operations, I hope we can count on you.

Thanks,

Oyebisi Babatunde Oluseyi

Executive Director, Nigeria Network of NGOs

Profiling YRK Award Winner: Ms. Ndifreke Andrew-Essien

Living the Life

Little did she know then that a wheelchair would become a support, but today Ndifreke has risen above the wheelchair and now she chairs her way into the lives of the less privileged through her life transforming impacts. – This is Ms Ndifreke Andrew-Essien, the very first YRK Award winner giving insight into the driving force of her charitable works. The Yemisi Ransome –Kuti (YRK) Leadership Award was established in March 2015 to honor outstanding Nigerians working in the not-for-profit sector who exemplify the leadership ideals of Ms. Yemisi Ransome-Kuti, a civil society activist and founding Executive Director of the Nigeria Network of NGOs (NNNGO) .


The accident was absolutely incredible, I never saw it coming” recounted Ndifreke Andrew-Essien in reminisce, who as a young adult in that particular year was on her way to rack up an impressive resume of becoming a medical student at the University of Calabar.

For Ndifreke, year 2002 was a very pleasant year coupled with the fact that she was doing very well in her academics. The day, December 26th, 2002 began with studying, a ritual she had of course grown accustomed to, she then decided to visit friends where at that moment for her it became rather unfortunate that fortune did not smile and met with the never to be forgotten accident even as she boarded a commercial motorcycle on that fateful day.

After two sets of long surgeries (in Tel-Aviv) and being bed-ridden for close to two months, doctors tried to explain nicely the damage that had been done to her back – a burst fracture of spine and that the best surgeries would do, will be to help her sit. “I have had to use a wheel chair ever since and rehabilitate myself to be independent” she confessed.

Independence and resoluteness then became her watchword which propelled the birth of her Foundation Freky Andrew-Essien Care Foundation well known as FAECARE Foundation that has a mission to inspire, motivate and empower creative minds for a better, bright and possible future and going further again with visions to add value to the lives of targeted vulnerable groups with disability and the less privileged in the community and thus creating life changing opportunities for them.

Ms Ndifreke who after the ugly incident could not bear to remain unresourceful, became involved in a lot of volunteering before she began channeling her little energy into FAECARE Foundation hence the achievements which include an annual children’s scholarships to vulnerable children who are out of school and the Hope Again Initiative which is a community based vocational skills which is targeted at female persons with disability.

All of these achievements which are fast becoming a milestone have thus paved way for the recognition of her foundation even in the new ‘hall of diligence and hard work of the YRK Awards coupled with some other international recognition, one of which is the Mandela Washington Fellowship and the recognition which went as far as being able to be part of the 40-member committee who got engaged with the first lady of the United States on issues centered around girl child education.

When asked if she ever felt she would emerge winner of the YRK Awards, she said “I honestly didn’t think I would emerge in the top 10 tackles of winner. Ever since I found myself as part of President Barak Obama’s Young African Leaders Initiative and emerged a Mandela Washington Fellow, I advised myself to take advantage of opportunities even when I don’t rate myself high or feel worthy. When I received the detail via email of YRK awards, I was actually in Ghana on a 6-month internship program at an International –NGO. I think I received at least two mails before I decided to apply. My general thought was that for sure someone in Lagos or Abuja would definitely get it not me far and somewhere busy doing my thing in Rivers state…basically I was thrilled when I got the mail that I had made top 3 and was definitely shocked when I was announced winner during the NNNGO’s conference”.

Ms Ndifreke who did not fail to acknowledge the giant and huge step of the organizers of the YRK Leadership Award pledged never to relent nor fail in this worthy course but that the award would serve as a boost to intensify more efforts and dedication in the third sector both as an individual and as an organization.  She further stated that she hopes to increase her circle of influence and encourage more youths into selfless service which has its own reward system which may not necessarily be monetary. “The YRK Award is a motivation to continue on the path I am on and strive for improvement and development” she concluded.

FUTURE TARGETS

As we celebrate the International Youth Day, NNNGO’s Olaife Ilori spoke with HillCity Foundation- a member of the Network on what they are doing to develop young Nigerians.

Future Targets

The overall well-being of youths has sharply declined in the last few years and the chances that these youths might be prone and tend for the worse have more than doubled.

Youths, the future of the nation and the driving force of tomorrow wills more than ever to lay down her own quota to the development of the nation but typically and ever so unfortunate that the hopes of these young lads always are dashed to shreds.

Looking at the plurality of labor market, financial and unemployment challenges that young people face, one could expect that national policies should address the long-term problems of young people and that the crisis should act as a facilitator in this respect.

For these unfortunate incidence to be forever forgotten, forsaken and never re-visited at least not in this part of the world made HillCity Foundation compelled to take action, believing that every young person needs hope, love, care, direction, motivation and support, in order to discover, develop and deploy their potentials maximally. Founded on infallible principles of life in the year 2004, HCF envisions to discover, develop and deploy young destinies to enable them fulfill their potentials in life maximally.

Soares Oladamola, The Executive Administrator of HillCity Foundation said that the Foundation particularly aims to discover, develop and deploy young destinies to fulfill their purpose in life even amidst all the challenges of life.This is achieved through carefully designed programmes as captured as 4 AXIS OF IMPACT which are: educational support programme, mentorship programme, self-discovery and personal development programme and economic empowerment programme.

Through the Educational Support Programme, HCF supports young university undergraduate through an annual scholarship scheme. The mentorship programme seeks to discover, recover and maximize the destinies of young lives. While the self-discovery and personal development programme wills to assist young lives to discover, develop and deploy their potentials. The last axe which is economic empowerment programme also seeks to empower young lives by assisting young graduates to start up business by empowering them with a start-up capital.

Mr. Soares Oladamola, with a gladsome heart affirmed the achievements of HCF, that from inception till date, the foundation has been able to award over 500 University Scholarships through the educational support programme, Over 600 mentees have gone through the HCF Mentorship Programme,the Foundation has also been able to organize several self-discovery seminars on the platform of the Self Discovery programme and the Foundation also organized several self-discovery seminars on the platform of the Self Discovery Programme which has received lots of laudable ovation from the declared testimonies.

“Overall, it seems that younger generations indeed face several systematic issues more than previous generations, yet adequate individual, family and state support is largely lacking. Hopefully societies and the government do not realize too late that in order to maintain a well-functioning economy and society, younger generations need a firm footing in the job market and all other areas of the economy with ample stability” concluded Mr. Oladamola

Young people today and tomorrow

From social entrepreneurs to journalists, from voluntary workers to members of community organizations, from acclaimed celebrities to social health workers, young people are always seen contributing and shaping society to lead it towards political, cultural and economic renewal.

The UN defines the worlds’ youth as the age group between 15 and 24 years old, making up one-sixth of the human population. Many of these young men and women live in developing countries and their numbers are expected to rise steeply.

The idea for International Youth Day was proposed in 1991 by young people who were gathered in Vienna, Austria, for the first session of the UN’s World Youth Forum. The forum recommended that an International Youth Day be declared, especially for fundraising to support the United Nations Youth Fund. In December 17th1999, in its resolution 54/120, the United Nations General Assembly endorsed the recommendation made by the World Conference of Ministers Responsible for Youth (Lisbon, 8-12 August 1998) that 12 August be declared International Youth Day.

This day seeks to promote young people’s effective inclusive civic engagement at all levels, acknowledging them as essential partners in change and an opportunity to raise awareness of the challenges and problems facing them. It is also an opportunity to celebrate the creative force that young people bring to every society aiming to promote ways to engage them in becoming more actively involved in making positive contributions to their communities and celebrating their potentials as partners in today’s global society.

The theme of International Youth Day, 12 August 2015, is “Youth Civic Engagement.” The engagement and participation of youth is essential to achieve sustainable human development. Yet often the opportunities for youth to engage politically, economically and socially are low or non-existent. Statistics show that young people are three times more likely to be employed than adults, credits to AGILITY, yet another statistics show that almost 73 million youth still look for employment. The UN Population Fund estimates that the global population of young people between the ages of 10-24 has hit 1.8 billion constituting 18 percent of the global population.

Nigeria‘s population is estimated at over 150 million people which the youth constitutes 70 percent of its population yet the government keep making empty political promises to the Nigeria growing youths without fulfillment. Since Nigeria gained independence in 1960, only few privileged youths had opportunity to gain political power at the local, state and federal levels. Some so-called Nigerian youth claim to represent the interest of the youth at the federal government are above 50 years, this sadly indicates the gloomy future of Nigerian youth.

Today our youths are nobodies, Boko Haram insurgents continually increase daily in the Northern region many thanks to the political leaders in this region who continually fail to provide for its youth who finally succumb to callous activities. Gone were the days when youth see educational pursuits as the only way to success but the reverse is the case today that the more educated as a youth, the higher the rate of joblessness. It is rightly quoted that an “idle mind is the devil’s workshop”.

Gladly, in September of this year, world leaders will meet in New York to announce a new set of global goals, the Sustainable Development Goals, which will hopefully shape the future of people, young people and planet by ending poverty, inequality and climate change.

Action/2015, a global movement which desires change in all spheres will continue to mobilize the public worldwide and remind leaders that the world is watching and calling for ambitious goals, the youth most inclusive for they are the tomorrow that must be invested in today.

We are young, we are inexperienced, some may call us naïve, but get there we will someday, Rome was not built in a day. We dream of a better world, a world where there is absence of inequality, where parents, the society and the government believe and invest in us knowing fully well and being assured that there will be multiple yields and that massive greatness lies in us.“Young people must be considered the drivers of change, and not only beneficiaries or targets” Irina Bokova UNESCO Director-General