List of NGOs in Nigeria

Searching for a well-updated list of NGOs in Nigeria can be very difficult but many thanks to the Nigeria Network of NGOs (NNNGO) which is the first generic membership body for civil society organisations in Nigeria with over 3495 organisations ranging from small groups working at the local level, to larger networks working at the national level.

 

The list of NGOs in Nigeria facilitated by Network which charged with the objective of identifying, registering, coordinating, building capacity, and mobilizing civil society organisations to promote interconnectivity and bring equity, justice, peace, and development to grassroots communities throughout Nigeria, including the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

 

The list of NGOs in Nigeria registered with NNNGO is grouped according to the states, thematic areas, and alphabetical order which is stated below: NGO’s Directory by State, NGO’s Directory by Thematic Area, and NGO’s Directory by Alphabetical Order.

 

The followings are the list of NGOs in Nigeria grouped by states

ABIA

  • ABIA NORTH INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT INITIATIVE
  • AFRICA HOPE ALIVE INITIATIVE
  • AFRICOMMUNITY TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT CENTER
  • ANNABELLES BOGI DEVELOPMENT INITIATIVE (ABDI)
  • ASA-AMATOR AMATEUR WOMEN COUNCIL
  • CECILIA NKEMAKOLAM FOUNDATION
  • CITY TAKERS NETWORK
  • DCOM WORD ACADEMY
  • DESIRABLE-IMPACT
  • DEVELOPMENT GENERATION AFRICA INTERNATIONAL
  • DICK TIGER IHETU FOUNDATION
  • DIPLOMAT YOUTH ORGANISATION

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Below is the list of NGOs in Nigeria grouped by Thematic Areas

ADVOCACY

  • ABONNEMA YOUTH ADVOCACY MOVEMENT
  • AFRICAN VULNERABLE WELFARE EMPATHETIC AND EGALITARIAN SOCIETY OF NIGERIA
  • ANPEZ CENTRE FOR ENVIRONMENT AND DEVELOPMENT
  • ELFRIQUE SOLUTIONS LIMITED
  • FEDERATION OF OGONI WOMEN
  • IDAMA BELEMA ERE
  • INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR HUMAN RIGHTS AND SOCIAL JUSTICE
  • KANO NETWORK OF NGOS.
  • KEEPING IT REAL (KIR) FOUNDATION
  • PRIVATE INVESTORS CLUB
  • PROJECT NEW NATION

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The list of NGOs in Nigeria according to Alphabetically order

  • Abibimman Foundation
  • Abraham Adesanya Foundation
  • Abraham’s Children Foundation (ACF)
  • Abraham Omuya Foundation
  • Abia North Industrial Development Initiative
  • Able Reading Group
  • Abuja Children and Youth International Association of Nigeria (ACYIAN)
  • Abuja Metro Junior Chamber
  • Academic Associate Peace Work
  • Academic Associates
  • Accountability Commitment For Innovative Optimism & Excellence Foundation
  • Ace Development Initiatives
  • Achievers Development Centre
  • Achievers’ Multipurpose Cooperative Society

Kindly read more here

list of NGOs in Nigeria

Understanding the Financial Action Task Force (FATF)

CE-FATF-ENG NEWSLETTER (JAN) 2017

 

The Financial Action Task Force on Money Laundering (FATF) was founded in 1989 on the initiative of the group of seven (G7) summit held in Paris. This intergovernmental organization, which is also known by its French name, Groupe d’action financière (GAFI); was charged with developing policies to combat the growing trend of money laundering. Over the years, the world and Africa in particular, experienced a heavy surge in the rate of illicit financial flows which totaled as much as US $50 billion per annum. The negative impact of such flows on development and governance 2 agenda of Africa could not be overemphasized, as it was detrimental to sustainable development. The establishment of FATF was therefore necessary to curtail these illegal earning, transfers and utilization of money between countries.

 

In 2001, its purpose was further expanded to act on terrorism financing and monitoring countries’ progress in implementing the FATF recommendations by ‘peer reviews’ of member countries, which ultimately forms the basis for a coordinated response.

 

First issued in 1990, the FATF 3 Recommendations were revised in 1996, 2001, 2003 and most recently in 2012 to ensure that they remain up to date, relevant and of universal application.

 

Although Nigeria suffered some deficiencies and was thus delisted in June 2006, however, the country continues to show strong commitment towards combating money laundering with its improved status with the FATF while it remains under the watch of GIABA with an outstanding fact.

 

These recommendations are recognized as the international standard for combating money laundering, the financing of terrorism and proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, which is also referred to as “policymaking body”. The FATF works to identify national-level vulnerabilities with the aim of protecting the international financial system from misuse.

 

Since its establishment, the FATF has evolved into an increasingly influential policy-making and compliance body. Well over 180 countries are now committed at the ministerial level to implementing the FATF Recommendations’ law and policy.

 

Member countries are subject to rigorous assessment by the FATF and its regional bodies every 6-7 years with peer review and follow-up mechanisms, which are used to assess and improve states’ compliance. Countries that score badly must agree to enact wholesale reforms while ‘non-cooperating territories’ are named shamed and face ‘blacklisting’.

 

These measures are carried out upon the Task Force’s standards, which have become a central feature of the global good governance agenda and good compliance ratings, which are particularly important for developing countries seeking aid, trade, and investment deals. South Africa actually remains the only African member country.

 

Although Nigeria suffered some deficiencies and was thus delisted in June 2006, however, the country continues to show strong commitment towards combating money laundering with its improved status with the FATF while it remains under the watch of GIABA with an outstanding fact.

 

It maintains that upon the blacklist, an accompanied word of caution to the international community to deal cautiously with countries on the list which spelt negative impact on the economies of these countries were listed thereon and so it was in this context that the 1.

 

Nigerian government made concerted efforts to improve the image of the country, which led to the enactment of the Money Laundering (Prohibition) Act of 2004.

 

With its Secretariat housed at the headquarters of the Organization for Economic Co-operation, FATF’s objectives remains still to set standards and promote effective implementation of legal, regulatory and operational measures for combating money laundering, terrorist financing and other related threats to the integrity of the international financial system.

 

The cost of money laundering and underlying serious crime is very large. It is estimated between 2 and 5% of global GDP.

 

This eyeopener will therefore enable national authorities to take more effective action against money 2 laundering and terrorist financing. Consistent gathering of stakeholders will improve on their momentum through the Task Force embarked mission of purposeful and aggressive steps towards curtailing all corruption excesses.

 

END

Published with the support of OSIWA

This newsletter is published as part of the civic engagement on the Financial Action Task Force evaluation on Nigeria project supported by OSIWA. All opinions expressed are that of the authors and does not reflect that of OSIWA or NNNGO or any other organization(s) mentioned.

 

About CE-FATF-ENG: CE-FATF-ENG stands for civic engagement on the Financial Action Task Force evaluation on Nigeria.

This newsletter is part of the CE-FATF_ENG project implemented by NNNGO with the support of Open Society Initiative for West Africa (OSIWA).

 

Further information: E: nnnngo@nnngo.org | T: 0802 857 3849 | F: @nnngo T: @nnngo

Information on Grants

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Dear Members,

 As we await that time when the COVID-19 pandemic turns a curve and we can return to our normal activities, we implore you to stay strong and continue to support one another by adhering to governments’ directives on social distancing, hand washing and other preventive measures against the spread of the disease. 

 

As nonprofits, we encourage that you remain on guard and strengthen your systems especially against entities that may pose threats to the integrity and accountability of your organisations during this pandemic. We have taken the time to produce an advisory document based on the Anti-Money Laundering and Countering the Financing of Terrorism (AML/CFT) standards.

Please download here . Stay Safe!

Committing to Realizing Positive Sustainable Change – November Newsletters 2019

Committing to Realizing Positive Sustainable Change – Istanbul Principle XIII

Over the years, Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) have embarked on programs/projects that assist communities to become empowered and ultimately attain sustainable development. In the bid to implement various sustainable development-related projects, CSOs are often encouraged to work in collaboration with beneficiaries by involving them at the various stages of the project implementation through proper consultation, information-sharing, and partnerships.

 

As agents of development, CSOs serve as service delivery partners and therefore act as the link between the public and private sectors as well as stand in a position to more holistically identify and address developmental gaps that have been otherwise left behind by the other two sectors. Very importantly, they serve as a political watchdog and ensure equitable governance through monitoring and reporting progress at local levels.

 

The eighth Istanbul principle of development effectiveness – “CSOs are effective as development actors when they collaborate to realize sustainable outcomes and impacts of their development actions, focusing on results and conditions for lasting change for people, with special emphasis on poor and marginalized populations, ensuring an enduring legacy for present and future generations” implies that; for effectiveness, self-reliance, and sustainability on project impacts, CSOs should embark on capacity building projects to develop the knowledge and skill of the community to mobilize resources.

 

CSOs programs should be aimed at improving the economic well-being of communities by job creation and income generation which in the long run, will contribute to sustainable community development. Proper consultation and embarking on community-driven projects motivates local level participation in developmental projects to improve their quality of life and commit to realizing sustainable change.

 

Project sustainability should always be factored before embarking on project activities. The beneficiaries need to feel the impact of the project even after the project/donor fund is exhausted. Project effectiveness and maintenance can be actualized through proper stakeholder mobilization, collaboration and building larger and more active local constituencies for grass root support and ensuring no one is left behind.

This newsletter is supported by Forus. However, the ideas and opinions presented in this document do not necessarily represent those of Forus , NNNGO or any other organisations mentioned.

 

NNNGO Launches Project to Strengthen Regulatory Frameworks for Civil Society

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About the Project

The Nigeria Network of NGOs announces the launch of a project, funded by the European Union, titled, “Strengthening Regulatory Frameworks for a More Accountable and Transparent Civil Society in Nigeria”, that focuses on current regulatory realities within the Nigerian nonprofit sector with an aim to lead conversations and actions on how these regulations can be better implemented in a way that creates an enabling operational environment for Nigerian civil society organisations (CSOs).

 

Project Launch

A project launch themed “Understanding Nonprofit Regulatory Frameworks; Trends and Realities” was organised in Abuja on Monday, November 4, 2019.  Participants who comprised seventy-two (72) CSOs gave insights into how best to carve out and popularize a self-regulatory mechanism that is responsive to the needs of the sector and can be effectively implemented in line with global best practices. 

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The Nigerian third sector is gradually awakening to the need to work together with regulators especially with regards to compliance issues and generally improve transparency and accountability within the sector. We are confident that this project and our approach to its implementation will allow for mutual communication among civic actors, regulators, and policymakers and we can all collaborate to create an enabling regulatory environment for the sector.

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Oyebisi Oluseyi, Executive Director of the Nigeria Network of NGOs.

“We are excited about this project especially as it focuses on one of our strategic pillars as organisation protection of the operational environment of Nigerian Nonprofits. We also expect that by the end of the project, one of the outcomes, among others is that it will serve as a repository of knowledge on nonprofit regulations, and provide key insights on how to incorporate global best practices into our work and the civil society sector as a whole” added Oyebisi Oluseyi. Conversations revolved around issues of registration of Nigerian Nonprofits, regulations, legitimacy, accountability, and transparency for the third sector. Participants also discussed the development of a nonprofit Code of Conduct by the sector, for the sector and approved by the Government as a guide for the operations of the Nigerian NGOs. Suggestions were made as to how nonprofits can better engage in collaborations, employ public information systems, peer review, and self-assessment mechanisms to allow growth and sustainability of organisations, especially those at the grassroots. 

 

A newly designed page tagged “Strengthening Regulatory Frameworks” (SRF) which offers a comprehensive understanding of the project has been created on the Network’s website www.nnngo.org where easy access is guaranteed to essential information on corporate governance within the Nigerian civil society sector, nonprofit realities as well as general information about Nigerian nonprofits. The page will be updated on a regular basis with news, pictures, and videos of project events, activities, milestones, and updates.  

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The project is intended to include peer reviews, consultations with CSOs across the country to garner opinions on regulations that they consider ideal and enabling; engagements with regulatory authorities and the National Assembly with the aim of producing a solid self-regulatory frame for Nonprofit organisations operating in Nigeria.  

 

This publication is produced with funding from the European Union.

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Knowledge-sharing and Commitment to Mutual Learning within the Nonprofit Space – October 2019

Knowledge-sharing and Commitment to Mutual Learning within the Nonprofit Space – Istanbul Principle VII

Nonprofits play an increasingly important role in both local and international development. With a dynamic environment fraught with uncertainties, no single nonprofit is a repository of all knowledge, hence the need for continuous learning.

To address developmental challenges, the activities of nonprofits are increasingly reliant on high-quality information and knowledge shared- necessary for organisational effectiveness and sustainability through collaborative practices.

Knowledge is the intellectual capital of any organisation and it must be said that while many nonprofits lack the critical processes and knowledge needed to help them develop, evaluate, document, and share successful programs, there is quite a number who have these capacities. Being in the space to create and share knowledge with one another while mutually committing to continuous and sustained learning is key to long term organisational effectiveness for individual organisations and the nonprofit sector at large. Part of the benefits for Civil society organisations (CSOs) involved in this kind of arrangement is the renewed capacity to execute key activities within a given time-frame.

Knowledge-sharing engenders growth within the sector especially when smaller nonprofits are privy to experiences of bigger organisations who faced down challenges in the past, learned from them and eventually delivered on their goals. Thus, various actors while working together would produce knowledge and share essential information that promotes grassroots development.

The 7th Istanbul principle of development effectiveness states – “CSOs are effective as development actors when they enhance the ways they learn from their experience, from other CSOs and development actors, integrating evidence from development practice and results, including the knowledge and wisdom of local and indigenous communities, strengthening innovation and their vision for the future they would like to see”.

CSOs need to commit to mutual learning and knowledge sharing because developmental issues can only be addressed by acting together, which is necessary for achieving collaboration and mutual learning for nonprofits. Many pressing concerns are universal, and can only be tackled by multi-sectoral collaboration and sharing mechanisms. Working together guarantees long-term prosperity for all, reduces duplicity of actions and plays a key role in informing coherent policy-making for better global impacts.

Despite the dynamics of power among nonprofits in Nigeria that hinder proper information sharing and constitute barriers to collective knowledge development, nonprofits should see themselves as partners, collaborate, share information and commit to mutual learning from all stakeholders for the good of their organisation and the society at large.

This newsletter is supported by Forus. However, the ideas and opinions presented in this document do not necessarily represent those of Forus, NNNGO or any other organisations mentioned.

NNNGO Newsletter on Understanding the Companies and Allied Matters Act – September, 2019

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Constitutions help set the rules guiding the operation of nonprofits. They are important because they establish procedures that everyone can rely on and give a level of certainty about how the organisation should be run; the rules and processes provided in the constitution binds the board, the organisation and its members. Legally, a nonprofit’s constitution is what the Corporate Affairs Commission (CAC) uses to determine its object and decide if it is indeed, a nonprofit.

 

The first thing nonprofits need to understand when setting up their organisation or applying formally to the Corporate Affairs Commission is to ensure that their board meets either physically or online to discuss the constitution and agree to its adoption; the minutes of this meeting must be documented for future purposes.

 

When drafting a constitution, nonprofits should ensure that their constitution states the name or title of the organisation, clearly articulates the aims/objects(charitable purpose) of the organisation, clearly sets out the role/powers of the board indicating their job descriptions, appointment/tenure of office and replacement of trustees, how meetings of the board are called and held and what would happen if the organisation must wind up.

 

At this point, it is important for the prospective board(trustees) to read the constitution and accept responsibility through a signed document for leading the governance of the organisation and ensuring its effectiveness.

 

It is highly recommended that nonprofits do not copy and paste their organisational constitution to ensure that the constitution and governance documents accurately reflects their organisations’ peculiarities, situations that are unique to how their organisation operates or will operate; this constitution should contain rules that the particular nonprofit understand and will be able to follow.

 

Ultimately, nonprofits are required to have in place a constitution that governs its operations and safeguards it for efficient and effective running of day to day activities.  

 

This newsletter is supported by the Commonwealth Foundation. However, the ideas and opinions presented in this document do not necessarily represent those of Commonwealth Foundation, NNNGO or any other organisations mentioned. 

Pursue Equitable Partnerships and Solidarity – Istanbul Principe VI (September, 2019)

Partnerships among CSOs and various stakeholders are vital to cooperation, collaboration and problem-solving as all these are built on trust, mutuality, accountability and solidarity.

 

In a bid to pursue equitable partnerships and solidarity, there is a need for CSOs to see themselves as partners rather than competitors. This translates to a commitment to goals, efforts, and problems of other development actors in order to facilitate effective collaborations and information sharing which allows for local, national and global development.

 

It is important to note, however, that openness among all stakeholders; government, private sector, civil society, and the citizens will minimize the rate of conflicts while ensuring equitable partnerships and solidarity.

 

The sixth Istanbul principle of development effectiveness states thus – “CSOs are effective as development actors when they commit to transparent relationships with CSOs and other development actors,freely and as equals, based on shared development goals and values, mutual respect, trust, organizational autonomy, long-term accompaniment, solidarity and global citizenship”.

 

CSOs are encouraged to collaborate with other organisations who share their goals in order to maximize resources to achieve bigger impact. Even though the challenges of partnerships cannot be overlooked, CSOs must develop strong systems of conflict resolution to address disputes and issues that may arise during collaborations.

NNNGO Newsletter on Understanding the Companies and Allied Matters Act – August, 2019

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Nonprofit mergers are becoming a common trend in many countries and are now a topic of discussion among nonprofit leaders, board and funders. Mergers provide an avenue to preserve and strengthen needed service provided by nonprofits to diverse communities.

 

The Part F of the Companies and Allied Matters Act recognizes mergers; paving the way for nonprofits with similar objects and aims to merge under terms and conditions prescribed by the Corporate Affairs Commission. Lessons from studies and research have shown that mergers; improve image, reputation and public support for nonprofits, increases financial stability and efficiency of operations.

 

Merging might also help address issues of duplication of efforts and avoiding solvency especially with the difficult economic climate and the fact that the funding terrain for nonprofits is adversely affected.

 

With the passing of the amended Part F of CAMA, we anticipate an increase in the consideration for mergers by nonprofits to develop greater organizational efficiencies relating to programming, administrative capacity and financial sustainability.

 

Nonprofit considering mergers should ensure that they fuse with organisations that have similar mission and vision as them, make use of experts in the merger process and seek specialized knowledge on what the structure or emerging organisation, function and legal aspect of the merger would look like.

 

Nonprofits should also ensure that funders involved in the merger are given the opportunity to give input into the planning; the merging process should be seen as a collaborative one by identifying potential mutual gains that could be realized in the merger. 

This newsletter is supported by the Commonwealth Foundation. However, the ideas and opinions presented in this document do not necessarily represent those of Commonwealth Foundation, NNNGO or any other organisations mentioned. 

The Practice of Transparency and Accountability- Istanbul V (August, 2019)

Transparency and accountability are pivotal to achieving an effective civil society. Transparency refers to being honest and open; by implication, civil society organisations are expected to be clear enough for private and public scrutiny. Accountability is the ability for CSOs to willingly answer and take responsibility for their actions (decisions, activities or policies) and results. This is central to discussions relating to problems in non-profits as they are the two main pillars of good corporate governance and generally guide the way NGOs are operated, regulated or controlled.

Inline with fostering transparency and accountability, there is the need for CSOs to put in place internal self-regulatory mechanisms that serve as a check to their various activities, this is reflected in their governance strategy and structure, human resource and management, project management, monitoring, evaluation and reporting, and their financial management and sustainability.

 

The measures include – complying with registration and reporting requirements, adopting a core vision, values and mission, electing a board to guide its mission and review its performance, publishing annual reports, documenting administrative procedure, documenting project work plans and budgets, having a monitoring and evaluation system in place, providing sound account of fund management(recording all financial transactions with relevant receipts and supporting documents); putting systems in place to prevent fraud -such as regular audits,two signatures to account; constituent/ stakeholder feedbacks; among others.

 

CSOs are accountable to the government, donors, beneficiaries (people), partners, mission, board, staff and their fellow CSOs. This fosters responsiveness to the needs of their communities, the people they work with and other stakeholders engaged in development. Hence, proper accountability measures facilitate increase donor and citizen support.

 

Through advocacy, CSOs have played a critical role in promoting transparency and accountability within the government and the general society which has yielded positive results. However, they have been encouraged to improve their transparency and accountability mechanisms especially due to the increased rate of money laundering and terrorist financing activities that CSOs can be vulnerable to. To maintain public trust, CSOs need to work on improving their level of transparency and accountability.

The Nigeria Network of NGOs (NNNGO) is the first generic membership body for civil society organisations in Nigeria that facilitates effective advocacy on issues of poverty and other developmental issues. 

Do you have questions? Call or visit us.

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