Category: News

Profiling Food Basket International Foundation on World Food Day- FOOD FOR ALL  

Profiling Food Basket International Foundation on World Food Day- FOOD FOR ALL  

Without balanced diet, medications become ineffective and even dangerous to the sick. Without food, children cannot learn well in schools; without food, the labor force can never be productive and effective, and without food on the table, several tasks will definitely be left undone.

Agriculture in Nigeria is a branch of the Nigeria’s economy that provides employment to about 30% of the population as at 2010 and contributes to over 25 percent of its Gross Domestic Product. Prior to the Nigerian civil war, the country churned out agricultural produce that sustained its population, however, but after the discovery of crude oil, agriculture unfortunately transformed to a neglected statue.

With core values of compassion and love for humanity, Food Basket Foundation International (FBFI), the very first indigenous nutrition-focused foundation in Nigeria founded in 1989 with the singular mission of helping low income families, particularly the vulnerable. FBFI through the years has provided interventions and services with the aims of alleviating the effects of poverty, promoting nutritious practices geared towards food security, and providing means of developing secured sustainable livelihood to the hungry.

FBFI continues to work, at the grassroots, alleviating the effects of poverty on vulnerable populations in a sustainable way; providing nutrition, education and acting as a bridge between those who need the assistance and those who can make the requisite changes to the policies that will make nutrition, food security and sustainable agriculture achievable for healthy lifestyle.

FBFI, going all the way to mitigate the effects of poverty, malnutrition, poor health and disease conditions in Nigeria through innovations is also in total readiness to assist low income families within the sub-Saharan African region to obtain a sustainable livelihood system, which would reduce poverty, malnutrition, disease and infant mortality rate.

With a focused target audience who randomly fall in the range of women, children and youths, these groups are currently provided with small-scale farming at Community-Based Technology Transfer Centre (CTTC), with the sole purpose to gaining access to new and innovative technologies for increased production and provision of nutritional services.

FBFI has provided nutrition education services to several communities – including Aremo community in Ibadan. FBFI organizes feeding programmes in Kaduna, Jigawa, Katsina, Kebbi, Osun and Oyo States. The Foundation, at some point also facilitated the implementation of the Case Study on the Efficacy of Nutrition on Infants and Young Children.

Despite the numerous humanitarian projects, some other achievements include: Implementing Gender Informed Nutrition and Agriculture (GINA) project; the use of integrated agriculture and nutrition interventions to improve the nutritional situation of vulnerable groups, particularly children under age five; Accelerating Vitamin A supplementation (VAS) through Child Health Weeks in Ogun and Osun states in collaboration with Micronutritient Initiative (2006-2011); Developed HIV/AIDS and Nutrition training manual for agricultural extension workers in partnership with the Federal Ministry of Agriculture; Capacity building via Nutrition Education in Nutritional Care and Support for caretakers of OVCs and PLWHA in Plateau, Edo, Kaduna, Nassarawa, Kogi States and the Federal Capital Territory; Adaptation of curriculum modules focused on improving nutrition through home gardens for the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO); Community-Based and Participatory poverty reduction planning, programe.

The Food Basket Foundation International supports the international community towards achieving the global Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and has been able to successfully complete a large number of field studies and publications focused on nutrition, maternal-child health, agriculture, sustainable livelihoods and poverty reduction in Nigeria, facilitated training of street food vendors; provided water through deep wells and toilet facilities in several villages in the Akinyele local government area of Ibadan, Oyo State.

GirlForce: Unscripted and Unstoppable.

GirlForce: Unscripted and Unstoppable.

In spite of the numerous efforts by stakeholders to promote the girl-child education especially in Africa, Nigeria is still ranked among one of the countries with the highest number of girls with no access to formal education. In the instances when girls do get into school, a good number do not have the opportunity to complete primary education.

Increased efforts and initiatives of individuals and organisations advocating for the education of the girl child in any society transcends just personal development for the female gender; such investments ultimately position the society for positive transformation and change.

While poverty remains the most important factor for determining whether a girl can access education, studies consistently reinforce that girls who face multiple disadvantages such as low family income, living in remote or under-served locations or disability — are farthest behind in terms of access to and completion of education.

The Purple Girl Foundation (PGF), provides educational support, health coverage, as well as leadership and peer learning opportunities to under-served girls from indigent families to improve their prospects for the future. Borne out of a desire to provide opportunities for enhancing education for the girl-child, the foundation’s main function is; providing educational support to female children from indigent families at the primary, secondary and tertiary levels.

For future offerings, the foundation will focus on female children from indigent families in Lagos, Delta and Akwa-Ibom states. With this, PGF seeks to improve future prospects and opportunities for the girl-child through the following activities:

  • Full scholarships for young girls at the primary, secondary and tertiary levels with benefactors selected across public and low-cost schools for full academic sessions.
  • Provision of financial support to cater to feeding, stationery, examinations, uniforms and other miscellaneous expenses for the period of their education.
  • Provision of health coverage for all beneficiaries across primary, secondary and tertiary school levels.
  • Partner with training institutions to facilitate sessions on character development and peer learning for young girls.

TEACHING: The Past, Present and Future

On World Teachers’ Day (2019), UNESCO has adopted the theme: “Young Teachers: The Future of the Profession.”

The day provides the occasion to celebrate the teaching profession worldwide, to take stock of achievements and to address some of the issues central for attracting and keeping the brightest minds and young talents in the profession.

According to a new UNESCO Institute for Statistics’ paper, several developing countries are struggling to recruit, retain and train enough teachers to keep up with a large and growing school population. The paper further states that globally, about 263 million children and youths are out of school, including 25 million children of primary-school age. Meanwhile, in developing countries, just about 14% of youths complete upper secondary education; a disheartening percentage.

Teaching, according to some professors, is a conscious behavior that makes learning more probable and efficient such that teachers become and remain architects of all professions. It is estimated that to achieve the goal of universal primary education by 2020, countries will need to recruit a total of 24.4 million primary teachers and 44.4 million secondary teachers over the next 12 years, an important step towards quality education and sustainable society.

Education, a fundamental human right which is indispensable for the achievement of sustainable development requires quality teachers. Quality teachers who per time can transform their students to scientists, doctors, engineers and several noble professions regardless of relatively low income.

The noble profession combined with their qualities should not be ignored nor undermined for they are essential to the achievement of professionalism and sustainable development. Teachers are known to shape the minds of youths, making significant differences in their communities such that lives become more impacted even at limited speed.

While teaching is a special occupation, few do it effectively, playing pivotal roles in the school of transformation. While many are most incompetent, poor teaching of some peculiar subjects have shattered the hopes of many students who could not comprehend the tutorials, hence the need for educated young minds.

The ‘Born Teachers’ insistence on perfection has shaped many lives tremendously, acknowledging their pupils’ needs and addressing them albeit their challenges. Their compelling guidance to obey parents, respect elders, leaders, and to fear God, are golden teachings forever treasured, coupled with the established fact that teachers should show exemplary leadership skills in the upbringing of every child which also emphasizes on another fact that teachers either make or mar the end product of the noble profession.

They play pivotal parental roles and continue to do so even in the lives of their pupils. Taking care of one or two children is never an easy task in homes, let alone a teacher to about 30 pupils or more. It is recognized that teachers are not only a means to implementing educational goals, they also are keys to sustainability and national capacity in achieving learning and creating societies based on knowledge, values and ethics. They however continue to face challenges of poor training, low income and staff shortage.

Added to the challenge of numbers is one quality all too often, teachers are found working without resources or proper training. According to the UNESCO Institute for Statistics, the quality of education in many countries is undermined by a deficit of teachers. About 1.4 million teachers are missing in classrooms which are needed to achieve Universal Primary Education, the fourth goal being quality education.

For the future of this noble profession, researches reveal that teacher shortages in sub-Saharan Africa is the highest worldwide, it reveals a growing need of about 17 million teachers to achieve universal primary and secondary education by 2030. According to Teachers Registration Council Of Nigeria, Nigeria has just about two million qualified and registered teachers, with recorded statistics that the country will always be in need of 250,000 teachers annually to cater to the growing population of pupils.

While it is noted that some government owned schools can only boast of very few qualified teachers. Statistics reveal that West Africa has a growing need of about 7 million school teachers; unfortunately, Nigeria carries a massive chunk of that number. This is because the country has the largest out of school children, thus the urgent need of large number of qualified teachers.

Global Thematic Consultation on Education states several essentials for supporting teachers’ effectiveness which include: good conditions of employment, appropriate contracts and salaries, prospects for career progression and promotion; good conditions in the work environment, creating school contexts that are conducive for teaching and quality training for teachers.

At this juncture, action calls for international communities, governments and individuals to unite to produce and support teachers who can qualitatively teach and motivate students, especially in countries where the highest numbers of out-of-school children exist, while capacity building is also needful for the enhancement and sustainability of the quality of teachers in line with global best practices of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Teachers have proven to be pupils’ angels and of all very challenging professions, one of the hardest is being a good teacher. Safe to write that if students have not learned then the teachers have not in any way taught, therefore for optimum teaching to take place there is need for teachers to be well trained, equipped and very well paid.

KETURAH SPEAK

In the role she plays as a woman humanitarian, NNNGO’s correspondent, Olaife Ilori met with Keturah Shammah, Executive Director – Girls Education Mission International. A development practitioner with immense value in promoting the social, physical and economic development of the female gender. She has a global mandate of eradicating poverty as well as promoting and creating a sustainable impact for the female folks through quality education.

For more than a decade now, Keturah has been promoting girls’ rights for quality education such that they reach their potentials. A Leading Advocate for the achievement of the GLOBAL GOALS – AGENDA 2030, Keturah Shammah was involved in the just-concluded SPEAK CAMPAIGN, a Global Campaign launched by CIVICUS – World Alliance for Citizen Participation.     The SPEAK GLOBAL CAMPAIGN helps give a voice to everyone, everywhere. The campaign was created in response to the current global context in which people around the world are facing increasing attacks on their basic freedoms causing many to turn against each other. SPEAK! in one day of global action on September 20th represented the evolution of the Global Day of Citizen Action.  #TogetherWeSpeak

 

Follow the conversation:

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Your Foundation is GIRLS EDUCATION MISSION INTERNATIONAL; could you intimate us more on the kind of work your Foundation is involved in?

Girls Education Mission International helps girls in reaching their potentials. We focus on defending, protecting and promoting the right to education of girls through various activities such as Policy advocacy, supporting girls in school with school fees, sanitary pads, Uniforms and as well provide mentoring and relevant services to build their life skills.

 

I hear you are a SPEAK CHAMPION, was this Campaign your INITIATIVE? And if NO, how did you come by this laudable INITIATIVE?

SPEAK! The campaign was not initiated by our organization, it is a Campaign coordinated by CIVICUS- World Alliance for Citizen Participation. There was a call for application by CIVICUS for SPEAK Champions, we applied and fortunately after review of over 260 applications from 66 countries across the world, our organization was selected as 2019 Champion to mobilize and coordinate the activities of interested organizations to hold SPEAK Event in Nigeria.

 

So are you the only SPEAK CHAMPION in Nigeria?

No! There are Five (5) SPEAK Champions in Nigeria. SPEAK! is a Global Campaign. It cuts across countries of the World. In Nigeria, it is a nationwide Campaign. Our organization mobilized and coordinated the Campaign in the Northern Part of the country alongside other four Champions from the East, West and Southern parts of the Country.

 

How many organizations/individuals was your organization able to mobilize for the SPEAK CAMPAIGN Project in Nigeria?

We were able to mobilize over eight (8) organizations that held over 10 events and reached over 200 persons.

 

In response to the current global context, As a SPEAK CHAMPION, do you think the SPEAK CAMPAIGN can indeed speak and address the increasing attacks/issues/challenges faced by people world over?

For me SPEAK! Campaign is the answer to increasing attacks/issues and challenges faced by people world over. This is because, over the years, the female gender is particularly looking for answers to social issues affecting them and seeking opportunities to speak about their unheard challenges. The SPEAK Campaign hence provides such opportunities for them to come together with experts who are in the position to provide solutions to these struggles.

 

As a SPEAK CHAMPION, you created several events for the success of this Campaign and I am well aware that your Organization’s thematic function is on GILRS’ EDUCATION, my question is: do girls really have a future as regards education particularly in this part of the world?

The future of girls in line with education is the reality that educated mothers are more likely to send their children to school as uneducated mothers while helping their families break out of the cycle of Poverty in the process especially in developing countries. In order words “Better educated women tend to be healthier, participate more in the formal labour market, earn higher incomes, have fewer children, marry at a later age, make better health decisions and education for their children should they choose to become mothers”.

 

How sustainable is the future for young girls of this generation as regards the SPEAK CAMPAIGN

The sustainability for young girls of this generation as regards the SPEAK Campaign is guaranteed because; the Campaign aims at solving social issues surrounding the female gender. Through the SPEAK Campaign, issues regarding the girl child is addressed and plan to build girls future are well underway. For instance, our SPEAK Events this year focused on tackling the issues of GENDER VIOLENCE in Nigeria. The event brought together young girls and their male counterparts (boys whom they consider to be one of their distractions) from various locations and backgrounds to discuss issues affecting the girls and provide possible solutions to those problems. The girls were inspired to SPEAK their Possibilities against any form of violence they might face; hence – an advocacy Campaign was known as #IamPossible to be formally launched soon as one of our lined-up plans to sustaining the future of girls in Nigeria.

 

Did you think the CAMPAIGN was able to reach its GOAL?

Of course! Together, we have staged almost 180 events across 55 countries bringing together people across lines of division to have powerful conversations that create real change. And that’s the Goal of SPEAK! Campaign.

 

In what ways do you plan on ensuring the Campaign engages people to continue speaking even after it is well behind us?

The #IamPossible Campaign is one of our innovative ways of engaging the girls to SPEAK their possibilities and engage relevant stakeholders to advocate for nurturing and safeguarding the Possibilities of Girls. The SPEAK Campaign T-shirts provided for each participant SPEAKs more than a thousand words. The SPEAK Event Participants have resolved to carry out the Campaign and share an impactful version of the event to not less than 3 persons. May I end with this quote “SPEAK! Is not just a one day Campaign, it is a step by step process to solve several social issues” Frederic Adou, SPEAK Campaign Consultant CIVICUS.

 

 

NNNGO Newsletter on Understanding the Companies and Allied Matters Act – September, 2019

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Constitutions help set the rules guiding the operation of nonprofits. They are important because they establish procedures that everyone can rely on and give a level of certainty about how the organisation should be run; the rules and processes provided in the constitution binds the board, the organisation and its members. Legally, a nonprofit’s constitution is what the Corporate Affairs Commission (CAC) uses to determine its object and decide if it is indeed, a nonprofit.

The first thing nonprofits need to understand when setting up their organisation or applying formally to the Corporate Affairs Commission is to ensure that their board meets either physically or online to discuss the constitution and agree to its adoption; the minutes of this meeting must be documented for future purposes.

When drafting a constitution, nonprofits should ensure that their constitution states the name or title of the organisation, clearly articulates the aims/objects(charitable purpose) of the organisation, clearly sets out the role/powers of the board indicating their job descriptions, appointment/tenure of office and replacement of trustees, how meetings of the board are called and held and what would happen if the organisation must wind up.

At this point, it is important for the prospective board(trustees) to read the constitution and accept responsibility through a signed document for leading the governance of the organisation and ensuring its effectiveness.

It is highly recommended that nonprofits do not copy and paste their organisational constitution to ensure that the constitution and governance documents accurately reflects their organisations’ peculiarities, situations that are unique to how their organisation operates or will operate; this constitution should contain rules that the particular nonprofit understand and will be able to follow.

Ultimately, nonprofits are required to have in place a constitution that governs its operations and safeguards it for efficient and effective running of day to day activities.  

This newsletter is supported by the Commonwealth Foundation. However, the ideas and opinions presented in this document do not necessarily represent those of Commonwealth Foundation, NNNGO or any other organisations mentioned. 

Joint Statement by African Civil Society Leaders on Xenophobic Attacks on African Foreign nationals in South Africa.

(Lagos, September 5, 2019) Civil Society actors across Africa have expressed deep concern and condemned the ongoing violence against African foreign nationals in South Africa.

This comes in the wake of recent xenophobic attacks reportedly perpetrated by South African citizens against other African foreign nationals who reside and own businesses in the country’s largest city, Johannesburg. The recent attacks which allegedly began between September 1 and 2, 2019 have been described as inhumane acts of violence in which lives and properties of many African foreigners, resident in South Africa have been lost.

In a statement signed by 10 civil society organisations and coalitions from across Africa, the actors led by the Executive Director, Nigeria Network of NGOs, Oyebisi B. Oluseyi, describe the attacks as criminal, as they contravene the provisions of the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights, stating; “…these attacks regress our common economic and development agenda as Africans as enshrined in Agenda 2063 and stands in the way of attaining the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA) recently put in place by our governments to ensure that as citizens of mother Africa, we become prosperous.” They also noted that the xenophobic attacks which have been prevalent over the years challenge the continent’s common heritage and value systems.

In commending the efforts of many global civil society organisations who openly condemned the attacks, they commiserated with victims of the attack while calling on Governments of Nigeria and South Africa as well as the African Union to “develop a comprehensive plan to address this issue and use diplomatic routes to launch a joint-national campaign against crime and xenophobia by tapping into the expertise of civil society and the private sector in these regards” Oyebisi reiterated the commitment of civil society organisations to using their organisational platforms in raising awareness on the need for Africans to remain united especially in the context of Ubuntu.

A final call was also made to the media, leaders of thought, clergy, public servants, politicians, business and civil society in and out of South Africa to use their platforms in educating and sensitizing citizens on the ills of xenophobia and its implications for unity and social cohesion of Africans.

See full statement below 

 

Joint statement made by African civil society leaders on the xenophobic attacks on African foreign nationals in South Africa.

 

5 September 2019

 

We the undersigned leaders of civil society across the African continent are deeply concerned about the ongoing xenophobic attacks on African foreign nationals residing in South Africa. We deeply regret these unfortunate incidents that have claimed the lives and properties of our African brothers and sisters and led to the destruction of their properties and businesses.

 

We are worried that these attacks regress our common economic and development agenda as Africans as enshrined in Agenda 2063 and stands in the way of attaining the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA) recently put in place by our governments to ensure that as citizens of mother Africa we become prosperous.  More than this, the spate of violence undermines our common heritage and value systems as the African people.  These actions negate the provisions of the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights, are inhumane and undermine progress that have been made to advance human rights across the continent.

 

We condemn in its entirety these barbaric acts and call on the government of Nigeria and South Africa, and the African Union to take decisive steps and develop a comprehensive plan of action to address this issue while encouraging our brothers and sisters affected by these attacks to remain calm and continue to remain safe.

 

We welcome the steps already taken by some governments, including the South African and Nigerian Government and further encourage the use of diplomatic routes and launching of a joint-national campaign against crime and xenophobia by tapping into the expertise of civil society and the private sector in these regards.

 

We further commend the calls of our civil society colleagues globally, and particularly in Africa, who openly condemn these attacks.  We encourage them to work with the government and the good people of South Africa in developing plans and actions capable of bringing these attacks to a halt.

 

We are convinced that those who perpetrate these heinous acts do not reflect the values that South Africans cherish and uphold, hence we call on leaders of thought, clergy, public servants, politicians, business and civil society in and out of South Africa to speak up against these attacks; which no doubt could reverse gains already being made on attaining the sustainable development goals across the continent.

 

In order to bring an end to these acts and ensure they don’t recur, law enforcement agencies should act in a timely manner and bring the perpetrators to justice.

 

We call on the media as an integral part of the civil society community to use their platforms in educating and sensitizing citizens on the ills of xenophobia and its implications for unity and social cohesion of Africans.

 

As we continue to monitor the situation and follow up on government interventions to address this crisis, we commit as civil society to using our organisational platforms in raising awareness on the need for us as Africans to become more accommodating and to see each other as one within the context of Ubuntu- I am because you are.

 

Signed

 

  1. Nigeria Network of NGOs, Nigeria
  2. African Monitor, South Africa
  3. Civicus, South Africa
  4. West African Civil Society Institute (WACSI), Ghana
  5. Africa Platform, Kenya
  6. RESOCIDE, Burkina Faso
  7. JOINT Liga de ONGs em Mocambique, Mozambique
  8. Concertation Nationale de la Société Civile du Togo (CNSC-TOGO), Togo
  9. Afrikajom Center, Sénégal
  10. Collectif Contre l’Impunité et la Stigmatisation des Communautés (CISC), Burkina Faso

 

For further information email nnngo@nnngo.org

Pursue Equitable Partnerships and Solidarity – Istanbul Principe VI (September, 2019)

Partnerships among CSOs and various stakeholders are vital to cooperation, collaboration and problem-solving as all these are built on trust, mutuality, accountability and solidarity.

In a bid to pursue equitable partnerships and solidarity, there is a need for CSOs to see themselves as partners rather than competitors. This translates to a commitment to goals, efforts, and problems of other development actors in order to facilitate effective collaborations and information sharing which allows for local, national and global development.

It is important to note, however, that openness among all stakeholders; government, private sector, civil society, and the citizens will minimize the rate of conflicts while ensuring equitable partnerships and solidarity.

The sixth Istanbul principle of development effectiveness states thus – “CSOs are effective as development actors when they commit to transparent relationships with CSOs and other development actors,freely and as equals, based on shared development goals and values, mutual respect, trust, organizational autonomy, long-term accompaniment, solidarity and global citizenship”.

CSOs are encouraged to collaborate with other organisations who share their goals in order to maximize resources to achieve bigger impact. Even though the challenges of partnerships cannot be overlooked, CSOs must develop strong systems of conflict resolution to address disputes and issues that may arise during collaborations.

NNNGO Newsletter on Understanding the Companies and Allied Matters Act – August, 2019

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Nonprofit mergers are becoming a common trend in many countries and are now a topic of discussion among nonprofit leaders, board and funders. Mergers provide an avenue to preserve and strengthen needed service provided by nonprofits to diverse communities.

The Part F of the Companies and Allied Matters Act recognizes mergers; paving the way for nonprofits with similar objects and aims to merge under terms and conditions prescribed by the Corporate Affairs Commission. Lessons from studies and research have shown that mergers; improve image, reputation and public support for nonprofits, increases financial stability and efficiency of operations.

Merging might also help address issues of duplication of efforts and avoiding solvency especially with the difficult economic climate and the fact that the funding terrain for nonprofits is adversely affected.

With the passing of the amended Part F of CAMA, we anticipate an increase in the consideration for mergers by nonprofits to develop greater organizational efficiencies relating to programming, administrative capacity and financial sustainability.

Nonprofit considering mergers should ensure that they fuse with organisations that have similar mission and vision as them, make use of experts in the merger process and seek specialized knowledge on what the structure or emerging organisation, function and legal aspect of the merger would look like.

Nonprofits should also ensure that funders involved in the merger are given the opportunity to give input into the planning; the merging process should be seen as a collaborative one by identifying potential mutual gains that could be realized in the merger. 

This newsletter is supported by the Commonwealth Foundation. However, the ideas and opinions presented in this document do not necessarily represent those of Commonwealth Foundation, NNNGO or any other organisations mentioned. 

The Practice of Transparency and Accountability- Istanbul V (August, 2019)

Transparency and accountability are pivotal to achieving an effective civil society. Transparency refers to being honest and open; by implication, civil society organisations are expected to be clear enough for private and public scrutiny. Accountability is the ability for CSOs to willingly answer and take responsibility for their actions (decisions, activities or policies) and results. This is central to discussions relating to problems in non-profits as they are the two main pillars of good corporate governance and generally guide the way NGOs are operated, regulated or controlled.

Inline with fostering transparency and accountability, there is the need for CSOs to put in place internal self-regulatory mechanisms that serve as a check to their various activities, this is reflected in their governance strategy and structure, human resource and management, project management, monitoring, evaluation and reporting, and their financial management and sustainability.

The measures include – complying with registration and reporting requirements, adopting a core vision, values and mission, electing a board to guide its mission and review its performance, publishing annual reports, documenting administrative procedure, documenting project work plans and budgets, having a monitoring and evaluation system in place, providing sound account of fund management(recording all financial transactions with relevant receipts and supporting documents); putting systems in place to prevent fraud -such as regular audits,two signatures to account; constituent/ stakeholder feedbacks; among others.

CSOs are accountable to the government, donors, beneficiaries (people), partners, mission, board, staff and their fellow CSOs. This fosters responsiveness to the needs of their communities, the people they work with and other stakeholders engaged in development. Hence, proper accountability measures facilitate increase donor and citizen support.

Through advocacy, CSOs have played a critical role in promoting transparency and accountability within the government and the general society which has yielded positive results. However, they have been encouraged to improve their transparency and accountability mechanisms especially due to the increased rate of money laundering and terrorist financing activities that CSOs can be vulnerable to. To maintain public trust, CSOs need to work on improving their level of transparency and accountability.