Category: News

Creating Awareness about Hepatitis on World Hepatitis Day

Creating Awareness about Hepatitis on World Hepatitis Day

                                                                                  LOVE YOUR LIVER

A major global public health challenge, endemic in many parts of the world, with the highest prevalence in sub-Saharan Africa and East Asia, the Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infects more than 300 million people worldwide and is a common cause of liver disease and liver cancer. Viral hepatitis is the seventh leading cause of death globally, making it a silent killer and responsible for about 1.44 million deaths annually. Often times, many adults infected with the virus recover, but 5 to10 % are unable to clear the virus thus becoming chronically infected.

Hepatitis is an inflammatory condition of the liver, commonly caused by a viral infection. However, there are other possible causes of hepatitis; autoimmune hepatitis and hepatitis that occurs as a secondary result of medications, drugs, toxins, and alcohol. Autoimmune hepatitis occurs when the body makes antibodies against liver tissue while Hepatitis B is an infection caused by the hepatitis B virus. The virus is found in the blood and body fluids of an infected person and could be spread through unprotected sex with an infected person or sharing sharp objects with infected persons.

In 2015, hepatitis B resulted in 887,000 deaths, mostly from complications and 2,850,000 were recorded to be newly infected in 2017.  About two-thirds of patients with acute HBV infection sometimes have a mild illness that usually goes undetected, until the person becomes seriously ill from the virus. While the hepatitis B virus can survive outside the body for at least 7 days, it has an incubation period of up to 75 days and maybe detected within 30 to 60 days after infection which by then could develop into chronic hepatitis B with symptoms comprising, a general sick feeling, diarrhea, aches and pains, high temperature, loss of appetite, lethargy, abdominal pain, jaundice and dark urine.

The 5 types of viral hepatitis include hepatitis A, B, C, D, and E. Hepatitis A is always an acute, short-term disease, Hepatitis E is usually acute but can be particularly dangerous in pregnant women. Causes of noninfectious hepatitis include alcohol and some toxins.

In Africa, chronic viral hepatitis affects over 70 million Africans; 60 million with Hepatitis B and 10 million with Hepatitis C. Sadly, the disease affects the most youthful and productive Africans, causing catastrophic financial liability in its treatment.

Nigeria is one of the countries with the highest population in the world; with children and young adults constituting the bulk of these numbers. It is important to note that the commonest cause of liver disease in Nigeria is Hepatitis B and although pregnant women are generally considered at a lower risk for HBV infection, the rate of infected pregnant women as high as 11%, have been reported in southern parts of the country. In 2016, the Federal Government affirmed that over 22.6 million Nigerians lived with Hepatitis, with about 30% unaware of their status.

It is most important that knowledge around the Hepatitis disease and how best to eradicate it is shared by everyone. World Hepatitis Day is one of eight official global public health campaigns marked by the World Health Organization and the theme for this year’s World Hepatitis Day is ‘Invest in Eliminating Hepatitis’, highlighting the need for governments around the world to take active steps towards combating the virus.

Coordinating a global response to hepatitis has paved way to finding cure for hepatitis C and treatment and vaccine for hepatitis B. Interestingly, vaccine against hepatitis B has been available since 1982 and the vaccine is 95% effective in preventing infection and the development of chronic disease and liver cancer, chronic hepatitis B infection can thus be treated with medications including safe and effective vaccines ensuring millions do not suffer anymore. Because Hepatitis affects everyone, everywhere and much closer than we think, as humans, let us begin to love our livers so we could have healthier and longer lives.

Although, Nigeria has embarked on a journey to finding a cure by registering hepatitis-related cases, adopting universal vaccination, screening all donated blood, implementing policies aimed at prevention of mother to child infections and ensuring that all infants receive the hepatitis B vaccine immediately after birth, preferably within 24 hours, there is still a lot more to be done.

For you to love your liver and be able to live longer, you must know, prevent, test and be sure to treat Hepatitis. While care is aimed at maintaining comfort and adequate nutritional balance, including replacement of fluids lost from vomiting and diarrhea, it is important to encourage prevention through vaccination.

Profiling CRAPI on Children’s Day

Profiling CRAPI on Children’s Day

Child’s Rights Advancement and Protection Initiatives (CRAPI) is committed to the cause of children. Strengthening social and emotional competence in children, CRAPI Foundation creates an enabling environment where children’s rights are upheld, the foundation helps children grow to their full potential so they can advance and in turn transform their families and the society at large.

Ensuring this transformation sees the light of day, CRAPI designs, monitors and implements policies and programs which are meant to foster the growth and personality development of these children. For children in Lagos and Abia States, CRAPI sensitizes them through enlightenment programmes, making them aware about their various rights.

Some of CRAPI’s achievements include:

  • Parents Stand Up Against Child Sexual Abuse Project in collaboration with Ministry of Women Affairs, Abia State.
  • Combating Child Human Trafficking and Child Labour: This project is implemented in collaboration with NAPTIP and Ogunbela Avenue/Fola Ojikutu Residents Association in Lagos.
  • Production and Distribution of hand Books
  • No Baby In Prison Project: It targets the release of pregnant women and nursing mothers in Prisons- with a total of 40 pregnant women and nursing mothers having benefited from this program in Lagos and Abia State
  • Advocacy and Litigation of non-implementation of child’s rights Law in Abia state.
  • Girl Child Project: Safe & Sound Transition to Womanhood 1& 2.
  • Workshop on girls handling developmental changes and challenges. This workshop has resulted in the publication and distribution of the handbook, The Red Affairs, Every girl’s handbook in collaboration with LadyCare and MOWA (Lagos and Abia State).
  • SPEAK UP and SAY NO TO BAD TOUCH Projects: At implementation, these two projects has enabled visitations to about 10 schools in Lagos state by experts and the CRAPI foundation with the aim of reaching out to schools to sensitize school children about sexual abuses and the need to break the silence among victims while providing support that is required for rehabilitation.

Other programmes embarked upon by CRAPI include;

  • Zero Tolerance for Babies in Prison in Imo and Abia States.
  • Bracing up to the Fight against Sexual Abuse.

 

Profiling Boigedacha Literary Initiative on World Telecommunication and Information Society Day

Profiling Boigedacha Literary Initiative on World Telecommunication and Information Society Day

Established to reform, restructure and revitalize the reading culture of students from primary to tertiary level through mass literacy campaign by building of libraries and reading clubs, Boigedacha Literary Initiative (BLI) was founded in Enugu State in 2010 with a mission to remain committed to effecting Sustainable Development Goal 4.

Acting as a defined positive factor in the development of educational sector in Nigeria through her literacy campaign such as building free libraries for Government primary and secondary schools, a move which thus far has birthed positive behavioral changes amongst students, BLI in the spirit of literacy campaign, collaborates with educational stakeholders and other interest groups in the development of reading culture in Nigeria.

BLI together with partners provide counseling, organize seminars and workshops for students on career guide, the foundation organizes and fosters educational programs in primary schools, colleges, higher institutions and several communities while assisting students whose parents cannot afford payment of school fees.

The foundation also engages in community development projects for socio-economic advancement of communities at large like the Reading Culture Platform which creates literacy centers in primary schools, colleges, higher institutions whileaccommodating school drop-outs and adults in the process.

Amongst BLI Activities:

*Mentoring, counseling and coaching of students in becoming the total child.

*Hosting reading and spelling competitions while teaching students how to learn using the scrabble game.

*Advocacy for the girl child education while campaigning against early marriage and championing good health as well as well-being.

*Engagement in peaceful, non-religious and non-political campaigns for national peace.

Since inception, Boigedacha Literary Initiative has organized about five reading competitions while several books have been given out to more than a hundred schools in five states including FCT Abuja, all with the aim of encouraging reading culture amongst students.

Profiling DFRHCE on World Telecommunication and Information Society Day

Profiling DFRHCE on World Telecommunication and Information Society Day

Located in the heart of Olodi Apapa, Lagos, Nigeria, Dako Foundation for Rural Healthcare and Education (DFRHCE) is a humanitarian organisation  established in 2008 and focused on improving the living conditions of disadvantaged communities in Nigeria through advocacy, education, public health measures and direct medical interventions. DAKO’s target groups include, under 5 children, women of reproductive ages, youths, People with Disabilities, People Living with HIV/AIDS and the society at large.

The Foundation’s works cut across Lagos, Edo and Imo States of Nigeria with relentless focus on rural and extremely hard to reach areas. Some of the projects implemented by DAKO foundation include:

  • Ibienafe’s School Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Project:

At Ibienafe community, South-Ibie, Edo State, Nigeria, Igebo primary school and Ibienafe community secondary school,  were most fortunate to be beneficiaries of the Information and Communication Technology project which championed the donation of ICT tools to the two community schools. Through this project, hundreds of students in Ibienafe, South-Ibie, Edo State are now computer literates while about ten primary and five secondary schools in adjourning six communities would also ultimately benefit from the laudable ICT project.

Facilities provided:

– 7 desktop computers with accessories.

– Computer desks and chairs for students.

– 5000-watt century stabilizer

– 5KVA generator for power.

–  A trained resident ICT tutor

–  Quarterly technical maintenance.

  • Biomedical HIV programmes

As part of efforts to achieve the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) on the 90–90–90 targets aimed at diagnosing 90% of all HIV-positive persons, provide antiretroviral therapy (ART) for 90% of those diagnosed and achieve viral suppression for 90% of those treated by 2020,  DAKO foundation has through a line up of activities ensured the implementation and realization of this goal in Lagos and Edo States.

Activities Include:

–  HIV Counselling and Testing

–  Referrals and contact tracing for Positive individuals

–  Information, Education and Communication (IEC) materials on HIV/AIDS

– Condom (Male and Female) demonstrations and distribution

– Advocacy on HIV prevention.

  • Medical Missions/Outreaches

General health sensitization, medical consultations and treatments, referrals/follow up, free drugs, free eye checks and glasses, vitamin A supplementation and deworming (chewable albendazole) for school children, provision of Insecticide Treated Nets, referrals and medical procedures particularly for cases requiring surgery are also part of activities embarked upon by Dako Foundation in recent times. These activities have reached well over 10,000 rural dwellers in Lagos, Edo and Imo states.

In the process, there was a record of 90 dewormed children: 90 free eye glasses; 273 general treatments; 38 distributed water treatment units; 2 distributed wheel chairs and a clutch.

  • Post Flood Disaster Intervention for Victims of Flood

The aim of this outreach which reached over 5,132 people was to alleviate the pains inflicted on flood-ravaged areas of Anegbette, Osomegbe and EkperiUdaba, Etsako Central Local Government Area of Edo State, Nigeria.

Impacts: Distributed antifungal drugs; Distributed easy to use water sanitizing units with storage; Distributed food items;Distributed clothes to community dwellers; Distributed lifesaving prenatal and post-natal multivitamin supplements to pregnant and lactating women; Vitamin A supplementation for children; Medical consultation, prescription and treatment of local prevailing diseases.

  • Free Medical Surgery

During a medical mission in Edo State, Nigeria in 2016, DFRHCE came across little Amira aged 18 months who was born with brain tumor. For four years now, Amira has been under direct sponsorship by DFRHCE with free medical care at Dako Medical Centre, Lagos, Nigeria. So far, two surgeries have been done on Amira. The first surgery was conducted in the Emirates with the aim of removing the brain tumor followed by a second surgery carried out in Nigeria to repair Cleft palate and Cleft lip.

  • Water Project

An estimated 13,000 people were reached at the construction of a 40 feet high scaffolding to carry 10,000 liters of water reservoir with underground water extension pipes and taps in two communities(Iyerekhu, South –Ibie) Edo State, Nigeria.

PRESS FREEDOM: A PRINCIPAL PILLAR TO GOOD GOVERNANCE

PRESS FREEDOM: A PRINCIPAL PILLAR TO GOOD GOVERNANCE

As the world focuses on development media, its obvious control especially on the corridors of power cannot be overlooked. For the grand health of any democracy, access to information is most essential and press Freedom, a most effective instrument for a functional democratic system acts as a foundation, a resounding expression, too important to be ignored in a democratic society.

The United Nations’ 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights states: “Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; this right includes freedom to hold opinions without interference, and impart information and ideas through any media regardless of frontiers”. Freedom of the press is the freedom of communication and expression through various media; as seen in the modern day electronic media and publications. Such freedom implies the absence of interference from over-reacting leaders. Hostility expressed by leaders towards the media incites violence, in fact it fuels fear for journalists which does not give room to act as watchdog of democracy.

So many theories have defined press freedom, the Libertarian theory, however stands as theory-friendly to the modern-day freedom of the press, it argued that media does not need to be controlled because people would naturally follow their conscience, engage in public debate and create a better life for themselves.

According to Lyman Tower Sargent an American professor of political science, he opined that the seven types of liberty that compose a democratic ideology are: The right to vote; Freedom of speech; Freedom of the press; Freedom of assembly; Freedom of religion; Freedom of movement and Freedom from arbitrary treatment by the political and legal system.

This year’s global theme for World Press Freedom Day is “Media for Democracy: Journalism and Elections in Times of Disinformation”. Information is power, hence it must be timely, concise, clear and reliable. As powerful as information is, it must be curtailed to some point such that false information does not degenerate to Hate Speech or related offences. Currently in Nigeria, any person who publishes defamatory matter is liable to one-year imprisonment, where the person who publishes the defamatory matter and aware that it is false is liable to two years imprisonment.

In line with goal 16 of the SDGs which aims to promote peaceful and inclusive societies based on respect for human rights, the rule of law, accountability and transparency, the United Nations General Assembly hence declared May 3rd as World Press Freedom Day to raise awareness of the importance of freedom of the press and remind governments of their duty to respect and uphold the right to freedom of expression enshrined under Article 19 of the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights with a close reminder to the entire world that in dozens of countries, several publications still remain censored, fined and suspended; while investigative journalists, editors and publishers are continuously harassed, attacked, detained and even murdered in extreme pursuit of stories.

According to the World Press Freedom Index, released by Reporters Without Borders, every year, RWB (2019) establishes a ranking of countries in terms of their freedom of the press. Norway remains still the country with the best press freedom in the world followed by Finland and Sweden ranked second and third on the index, respectively. Netherlands, Denmark, Switzerland, New Zealand and Jamaica also ranked top. Several authoritarian regimes have fallen in the Index.  The countries with the least degree of press freedom are China, Eritrea, North Korea and Turkmenistan.

Since the inception of this index in 2013, many African countries have struggled to climb up the ladder. In 2016, Nigeria recorded a decline on the world ranking, falling from 111 to 116; 2018 was no better, the country recorded another fall, moving from 116 to 119 out of 180 countries, year 2019 records 120 on the Index. This is indeed sad.

New record shows that eight journalists have been killed across the world in 2017, while more than 193 are currently imprisoned. Although Nigerian journalists are not so included on death lists. However, Journalists continue to face harassment without protection of the law even in Nigeria. Journalists are often times threatened, subjected to physical violence and even denied access to information by government officials, police officers and sometimes even the public.

Need we be reminded that if the press is constantly controlled, its ability to investigate and expose corruption, bribery, mismanagement, waste, embezzlement and other vices in democratic societies might just be truncated.

Yet again, according to libertarian theory on press freedom, the theory prescribes that an individual should be free to publish what he likes, holding and expressing his or her opinion freely. Obviously, libertarian theory advocates that the press must be seen as partner with government in search of the truth, rather than a tool in the hands of government, a good guide for media practitioners in their quest to helping nations, particularly developing nations grow. While The Social Responsibility Theory opines that the media have obligations to the society, owing them truth and objectivity, the media must ensure to religiously follow agreed codes of ethics and professional conducts to safeguarding public interest.

“Press freedom is the cornerstone of democratic societies. All states, all Nations, are strengthened by information, debate and the exchange of opinions. At a time of growing discourse of mistrust and delegitimization of the press and journalism, it is essential that we guarantee freedom of opinion through the free exchange of ideas and information based on factual truth” Audrey Azoulay, Director-General of UNESCO.

 

 

Method of Application for Incorporation of Trustees (April, 2019)

Method of Application for Incorporation of Trustees (April, 2019)

For nonprofits to be registered with the Corporate Affairs Commission; it is required that they go through the process of application as specified by the commission.

The commission requires that the prescribed application form be manually or electronically (online) filled by organisations intending to register, stating in the form, the name of the proposed corporate body which must contain the words: “Incorporated Trustees of (organisation’s name), aims/objectives of the organisation and names/addresses/occupations of the organisation’s secretary.

To be attached to the completed application form are the following; evidence of approval of name, two passport sized photographs, two printed copies of the organisation’s constitution, duly-signed copies of minutes of the meeting appointing the trustees and authorizing the application, showing the people present and the votes scored, the impression of the proposed common seal if the organisation has one and a payment fee of #37,000 (Incorporation of Trustees – 30,000, Certified True Copy of Constitution- 5,000 and Certified True Copy of Incorporated Form -2,000).

This application form must then be signed and submitted to the commission. The commission may at any time require a declaration in the dailies or any other evidence to verify if the statements and particulars provided by the organisations making the application are true and valid.

Failure to provide true and accurate information for the purpose of incorporating trustees with the Corporate Affairs Commission makes the organisation submitting the application liable to a penalty of one-year imprisonment or a fine as specified by the court.

This publication has been produced with the Commonwealth Foundation and the Nigeria Network of NGOs (NNNGO). However, the contents of this publication do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of Commonwealth Foundation or NNNGO.

Grants and Opportunities for Nigerian Nonprofits (April, 2019)

Grants and Opportunities for Nigerian Nonprofits (April, 2019)

Open Society Initiative for West Africa (OSIWA) Grant
Deadline: April 20, 2019.

OSIWA seeks proposals aimed at achieving the following specific themes; economic governance and advancement, justice reform and the rule of law, free, quality and independent, media equality and anti-discrimination, democratic practice. See here for details.

OHCHR Seeks Proposals for Minorities Fellowship Programme 2019      
Deadline: April 20, 2019.

The Minorities Fellowship Programme (MFP) is OHCHR’s most comprehensive training programme for human rights and minority rights defenders belonging to national or ethnic, religious and linguistic minorities. See more  here.

TY Danjuma Foundation seeks Applications for Health and Education Projects in Nigeria
Deadline: April 30, 2019.

Civil Society Organisations are invited to submit applications to fund health and education  projects in under-served and hard-to-reach communities across Nigeria. The call focuses on the following key areas: Preventable Blindness Maternal and Child Health Upgrading Teachers’ quality. See more here. 

International Conference on Sexual Assault, Domestic Violence, and Violence Across the Lifespan. Washington, DC
Deadline: May 1, 2019.

EVAWI is inviting workshop proposals for their 2020 International Conference. The conference promotes innovative techniques, unique approaches, and promising practices in responding to gender-based violence. See more here. 

Proposals for NGOs Small Grant Opportunity 2019
Began on 1 April 2019, 9:00 AM GMT and ends 3 May 2019, 23:59 GMT.

See more here.

Apply for Commonwealth Digital Challenge 2019 Media Tech Accelerator
Deadline: May 3, 2019.

The Media Tech Accelerator challenge is now open and aims to help young, aspiring and tech-savvy entrepreneurs from the Commonwealth to develop an app, digital idea or tool to improve the work or solve challenges encountered by, journalists, communicators and media organisations within the Commonwealth. See more here.  

Applications Open for Trust Conference Change Makers Programme 2019
Deadline: May 3, 2019.

Trust Conference Changemakers Programme is inviting all applicants working in the areas of modern slavery, women’s rights, economic empowerment, refugee support and other human rights areas. See more here.

Future Leaders Connect

Deadline: May 6, 2019.     

Visit here to connect with a long-term network of emerging leaders from around the globe, who want to change the world through policy making. As a member of Future Leaders Connect, you will travel to the UK for ten days of advanced policy and leadership development programme at leading institutions to discuss big global challenges, in the UK Houses of Parliament, meet inspirational leaders and the Møller Institute, Churchill College, University of Cambridge.

2019 D-Prize Grant to Recognise New Entrepreneurs who Increase Access to Proven Poverty Interventions
Deadline: May 12, 2019.

The world has already invented ways to end poverty, yet the best interventions are not being distributed at mass-scale. Can you design a business or NGO that solves distribution challenges? See more here.

Key Population Community HIV Services Action and Response (KP-CARE 1)
Deadline: May 13, 2019.

The United States Agency for International Development (USAID/Nigeria) seeks applications from organisations working on HIV services, action and response in Nigeria. See more here. 

Orange Social Venture Prize Africa & Middle East 2019
Deadline: May 30, 2019.

This contest aims to reward the best innovative and socially responsible projects in Africa and the Middle East. See more here.

Call for Proposal for Climate Chance Summit Africa 2019
Deadline: May 31, 2019.

Applicants are invited to apply for “Climate Chance Summit – Africa 2019” which will take place in Accra from October 16th until October 18th at the International Conference Center in Accra. See more here.

Skål International Sustainable Tourism Awards 2019 are now open
Deadline: May 31, 2019.

Skål International is an Affiliate Member of the UNWTO whose mission is to promote the development of responsible, sustainable and universally accessible tourism. See more here.

This newsletter is supported by Forus. However, the ideas and opinions presented in this document do not necessarily represent those of Forus, NNNGO or any other organisation mentioned.

 

 

THE PASSION THAT CONNECTS- Celebrating Sports for Development and Peace

THE PASSION THAT CONNECTS- Celebrating Sports for Development and Peace

In the last two decades, there has been a concerted effort to re-mobilize sport as a vehicle for broad, sustainable social development, especially in the most disadvantaged communities in the world.

According to WIKIPEDIA, sports include all forms of competitive, physical activity which through casual or organized participation, aim to use, maintain or improve physical ability and skills while providing entertainment for spectators.

The UN system also defines sports in the context of development and peace as all forms of physical activity that contribute to physical fitness, mental well-being and social interaction, such as play, recreation, organized or competitive sport, indigenous sports and games for the attainment of specific development and peace objectives.

For centuries, the role and impact of sports in the society has been a subject of debate. For some observers, sport is a physical activity always associated with competition among teams or nations for the pride and glory of winning, while for some it is a sort of pure entertainment.

Sports; games and physical activities are present in virtually every society, its popularity transcends political, national and ideological borders. While it remains the most unifying and networking tool for peace in the world, sport is a passion shared by women and men world over. It is a force for physical well-being and social empowerment. Research reveals that since the advent of Olympics in 1896, more athletes have come to agree that sports unite the world.

Football for instance, the most popular game in the world, is estimated by FIFA in 2007 to be played by about 2 billion people, while other games such as cricket, basketball and baseball, attract the interest of millions more worldwide.

2005 saw the establishment of the United Nations Office for Sport, Development and Peace (UNOSDP), with an objective to raise awareness about the use of physical activity, sport and play as powerful development tools in the advancement of development and peace.

UNESCO also indicates that to achieve the goals of peace and development, it is important to recognize the cultural dimensions of sport. Additionally, several agencies within the UN system (UNDP, WHO, ILO, IOM) also use sport as a factor in their projects for peace and development, hence the declaration of 6th April as the International Day of Sport for Development and Peace, to celebrate the contribution of sports and physical activity to education, human development, healthy lifestyles and a peaceful world.

The international Day of Sport for Development and Peace is a day when some of the world’s sports’ finest work together with community sports with the aim of enriching the lives of children and youth world over.

In more recent years, the use of sport to tackle issues related to equality and social justice emerged as a response from different sectors to even instances of violence and intolerance especially in most disadvantaged communities in the world while promoting good education, quality health-care, development and peace in its wake.

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development further reveals and acknowledges sport’s role for social progress: it clearly emphasizes the need for developed countries in aiding developing countries to achieve a “global partnership for development” and sport is definitely one good source of this partnership.

Further studies conducted by The Population Council and Harvard School of Public Health, evidenced the importance of sports through development and its positive effects on children and youth. These studies have also documented grassroots soccer model’s effectiveness in significantly improving students’ knowledge, attitudes, communication and decision-making skills.

This progress so much so influenced FIFA to launch the Football for Hope initiative in 2005 to help improve the lives of youth world over.

WHAT SPORTS CAN DO FOR YOU

  • Playing sports helps reduce body fat and controls body weight.
  • Sports can help you fight depression and anxiety.
  • Sports allows you to challenge yourself and set goals.
  • Sports help aid coordination, balance and flexibility.
  • Sports can help improve stamina and concentration.
  • Sports allow you to experience the highs and lows of winning and losing
  • Sports are a great way of bonding with families and friends.
  • If you are into sports, you are more likely to have a healthy life.

Every year, physical inactivity leads to an estimated 3.2 million deaths. This is why UNESCO joined forces with the World Health Organization to combat sedentary lifestyles, starting with quality and inclusive physical education for all youths which has considerable benefited children and youth in several countries.

In many countries, opportunities to participate in sports are limited by significant infrastructural, social and political barriers. For example, people with disabilities are marginalized in many societies, thus preventing their active involvement in sports.

And so as the world stays true to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, the world must do all to support sport to ensuring no one is left behind. Sport leaders and lovers must be ready to demonstrate commitment to creating a better world, despite shortcomings like geographic and social barriers.

Regardless of age, gender or ethnicity, we cannot take away the special love the world has for sports, it is enjoyed by all and sundry, sports build self-esteem, physical and mental health and nurtures positive connections with many.

The rights of every person to engage in sports must be respected and should be enforced worldwide. Government, Corporate Bodies, public and private sectors must all come together to create a world for sports which must not only be considered as a form of entertainment but rather an important investment in our present and our future for a lasting peace and development.

Human Rights and Social Justice in Nigeria (March, 2019)

Human Rights and Social Justice in Nigeria (March, 2019)

Fundamental human rights are the “inalienable rights of people”. These are legal entitlements enjoyed by every citizen of a country without fear of violation from government or fellow citizens. In every country, these rights are protected and enshrined in the National constitution- chapter 4 of the 1999 constitution of Nigeria states what are considered as the rights of every Nigerian citizen and how they can be    protected.

However, shreds of evidence show that despite the entrenchment of human rights in the Nigerian constitution, continuous restrictions on some aspects of citizens’ rights continue to undermine the status of human rights in the country. Over time, the civic space has been threatened. There have been cases of human right violations, ranging from the intimidation and harassment of human right defenders, restrictions on the freedom of expression, assembly and association, among   others.

The Sustainable Development Goals address the importance of protecting citizens’ rights. Goal 16 of the SDGs delineates the need to  provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels and the civil society must, in line with    the Istanbul principle of development effectiveness, which emphasizes the need for “respect and promotion of human rights and social   justice; carry out the responsibility of bringing accountability by exposing and following up on human right violations.

Accordingly, CSOs are effective as development actors when they develop and implement strategies, activities and practices that promote individual and collective human rights, including the right to development with dignity, right to decent work, social justice and equity for all people.

CSOs should be at the forefront towards ensuring the protection of these rights and the strengthening of civic space in Nigeria. Although   some measures have been put in place by the government to improve the human rights situations in Nigeria, there is still room for improvement.

This newsletter is supported by Forus. However, the ideas and opinions presented in this document do not necessarily represent those of Forus, NNNGO or any other organisation mentioned.

Filing of Annual Returns (March, 2019)

Filing of Annual Returns (March, 2019)

An annual return refers to profit made on investment, over a period of time. In Nigeria, corporate entities registered with the Corporate Affairs Commission (CAC) under the Companies and Allied Matters Act (CAMA) are mandated to file annual returns with the Commission, on a yearly basis.

Even though nonprofit organisations do not make profit on investments, Section 55 of CITA specifically makes it clear that ALL companies, registered with the CAC must file returns irrespective of tax exemptions conferred on their income. This helps to encourage transparency, accountability and to keep record of all functioning organisations, operating within the country.

Generally, organisations must file annual returns not earlier than 30th June or later than 31st December every year (except the year the organisation was incorporated). However, newly registered organisations begin filing their first annual returns, not later than 18 months after incorporation while older organisations file their annual returns not later than 42 days after their Annual General Meeting.

To file annual returns with the Corporate Affairs Commission, an organisation is expected to visit the CAC website, download and fill out an Incorporated Trustees Annual Returns form (CAC/ IT 4), attach an audited financial statement signed by a chartered accountant and two trustees of the organisation or a statement of affairs, in cases where the organisation is yet to commence operation along with a fee of  #5,000.

Complying with this law will aid the maintenance of good organisational structures as it encourages a culture of record keeping and puts compliant organisations on good standing with the Commission accurate and updated records of said organisations will be accessible to the commission which gives room for transparency and accountability.

Failure to file annual returns within the stipulated period will incur an additional cost of #5,000 for every year of noncompliance, as penalty. Persistent noncompliance to this law could result in eventual de-registration of errant nonprofits as the commission is left to assume that this organisation is non-operational.

Filing annual returns with the Corporate Affairs Commission as and when due helps to keep the organisation’s name on the commission’s register, saves time in situations where a nonprofit needs a post-incorporation service or documents from the commission and also prevents nonprofits from payment of penalties that apply for late filing of annual returns.

This publication has been produced with the support of Commonwealth Foundation and the Nigeria Network of NGOs (NNNGO). However, the contents of this publication do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of Commonwealth Foundation or NNNGO.