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Category: Announcement

Profiling The Irede Foundation (TIF) on International Day of Persons with Disability 2019.

Profiling The Irede Foundation (TIF) on International Day of Persons with Disability 2019.

Amputation surgery is an orthopedic surgical procedure carried out as the last resort, when limb salvage is not feasible. It is usually associated with social, emotional and psychological disturbances to patients and their families.

The incidence of amputation in populations have a base figure of 1-2 amputees per 1000 people for all causes combined. Some causes include: trauma (34%); malignant tumours (14.5%); diabetics (12.3%); infections (5.1%); peripheral artery disease (2.1%); and burns (2.1%).

Limb loss is much more common than many people realize, and its numbers, growing by the day. It is sad to know that statistics on the numbers of amputees especially in the developing world are staggering. Globally, there are more than 1 million annual limb amputations -— one every 30 seconds.

The estimated prevalence of extremity amputation in Nigeria is 1.6 per 100,000. Reports have revealed that the number is expected to double by 2050, which will by the way be faster than population growth. Meanwhile, limb loss isn’t just costly in the financial sense; it is expensive psychologically too.  According to research, approximately 30% of people with limb loss suffer from depression, anxiety, or both. While the demands on prosthesis in third world countries are often more difficult to meet than in developed countries, one way many organisations have lent their hands(giving their widow’s mite) is in the number of artificial limbs that they have been able to deliver particularly to the less privileged in the society.

As a provider of care and prosthesis for those suffering from limb loss, The Irede Foundation understands the peculiarity of this situation and in their own little way have ensured that if not all,  at least,  some are not left behind even in their bid to making children walk,  run and play again.

In this light,  The Irede Foundation focuses on working with child amputees to give them hope and help them live a fulfilled life. The foundation is able to achieve this feat by educating the general public, while also encouraging caregivers and empowering indigent children between ages 0-18 with artificial limbs.

Activities Include:

Limb Empowerment Programme: This program sorts for child amputees whether through congenital limb loss or through trauma, providing them with prosthetic limbs from first contact to age 18. With the goal to extend their voices globally, TIF organizes an annual 2km advocacy walk tagged “Out on a Limb”. The 2019 Walk was themed “ Ensuring Inclusiveness” for children and persons living with a disability. The Walk happens simultaneously across Nigeria.

For TIF, year 2019 has been full of eventful and worthy activities and achievements. TIF 2019 Achievements include:

* Limb Empowerment Programme: The Irede Foundation has been able to empower 21 child amputees with artificial limbs in the year 2019. Cumulatively, TIF has thus far empowered 99 child amputees with 136 limbs across 17  states in the 6 geo-political zones of the country.

* Out On A Limb: Recorded successful walks across 17 states in Nigeria and 7 global locations and recorded over 1,000 people in attendance with an indirect reach of 10,000.

*Media Feature:  Few months ago,  The Irede Foundation got featured on the top two Global Media Houses: CNN and BBC

In the bid to tell the world the story of Irede,  The CNN Changemaker captured the activities of the Foundation through the eyes and voice of the Executive Director as well as the full coverage  of Prosthetic Production (http://bit.ly/IREDECNN)

The BBC African Voices was also able to focus their lenses on people who have become  beneficiaries of the Foundation. http://bit.ly/IREDEBBC

The Irede Foundation is not about ready to relent in their service to humanity, TIF wants communities to be on the lookout and refer that child amputee who is in dire need of a prosthesis to The Irede Foundation, for at the Foundation, they  believe goodness has come to every amputee child that steps into their Foundation.

 

Committing to Realizing Positive Sustainable Change – November Newsletters 2019

Committing to Realizing Positive Sustainable Change – Istanbul Principle XIII

Over the years, Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) have embarked on programs/projects that assist communities to become empowered and ultimately attain sustainable development. In the bid to implement various sustainable development-related projects, CSOs are often encouraged to work in collaboration with beneficiaries by involving them at the various stages of the project implementation through proper consultation, information-sharing, and partnerships.

As agents of development, CSOs serve as service delivery partners and therefore act as the link between the public and private sectors as well as stand in a position to more holistically identify and address developmental gaps that have been otherwise left behind by the other two sectors. Very importantly, they serve as a political watchdog and ensure equitable governance through monitoring and reporting progress at local levels.

The eighth Istanbul principle of development effectiveness – “CSOs are effective as development actors when they collaborate to realize sustainable outcomes and impacts of their development actions, focusing on results and conditions for lasting change for people, with special emphasis on poor and marginalized populations, ensuring an enduring legacy for present and future generations” implies that; for effectiveness, self-reliance, and sustainability on project impacts, CSOs should embark on capacity building projects to develop the knowledge and skill of the community to mobilize resources.

CSOs programs should be aimed at improving the economic well-being of communities by job creation and income generation which in the long run, will contribute to sustainable community development. Proper consultation and embarking on community-driven projects motivates local level participation in developmental projects to improve their quality of life and commit to realizing sustainable change.

Project sustainability should always be factored before embarking on project activities. The beneficiaries need to feel the impact of the project even after the project/donor fund is exhausted. Project effectiveness and maintenance can be actualized through proper stakeholder mobilization, collaboration and building larger and more active local constituencies for grass root support and ensuring no one is left behind.

This newsletter is supported by Forus. However, the ideas and opinions presented in this document do not necessarily represent those of Forus , NNNGO or any other organisations mentioned.

 

NNNGO Launches Project to Strengthen Regulatory Frameworks for Civil Society

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About the Project

The Nigeria Network of NGOs announces the launch of a project, funded by the European Union, titled, “Strengthening Regulatory Frameworks for a More Accountable and Transparent Civil Society in Nigeria”, that focuses on current regulatory realities within the Nigerian nonprofit sector with an aim to lead conversations and actions on how these regulations can be better implemented in a way that creates an enabling operational environment for Nigerian civil society organisations (CSOs).

Project Launch

A project launch themed “Understanding Nonprofit Regulatory Frameworks; Trends and Realities” was organised in Abuja on Monday, November 4, 2019.  Participants who comprised seventy-two (72) CSOs gave insights into how best to carve out and popularize a self-regulatory mechanism that is responsive to the needs of the sector and can be effectively implemented in line with global best practices. 

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The Nigerian third sector is gradually awakening to the need to work together with regulators especially with regards to compliance issues and generally improve transparency and accountability within the sector. We are confident that this project and our approach to its implementation will allow for mutual communication among civic actors, regulators, and policymakers and we can all collaborate to create an enabling regulatory environment for the sector.

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Oyebisi Oluseyi, Executive Director of the Nigeria Network of NGOs.

“We are excited about this project especially as it focuses on one of our strategic pillars as organisation protection of the operational environment of Nigerian Nonprofits. We also expect that by the end of the project, one of the outcomes, among others is that it will serve as a repository of knowledge on nonprofit regulations, and provide key insights on how to incorporate global best practices into our work and the civil society sector as a whole” added Oyebisi Oluseyi. Conversations revolved around issues of registration of Nigerian Nonprofits, regulations, legitimacy, accountability, and transparency for the third sector. Participants also discussed the development of a nonprofit Code of Conduct by the sector, for the sector and approved by the Government as a guide for the operations of the Nigerian NGOs. Suggestions were made as to how nonprofits can better engage in collaborations, employ public information systems, peer review, and self-assessment mechanisms to allow growth and sustainability of organisations, especially those at the grassroots. 

A newly designed page tagged “Strengthening Regulatory Frameworks” (SRF) which offers a comprehensive understanding of the project has been created on the Network’s website www.nnngo.org where easy access is guaranteed to essential information on corporate governance within the Nigerian civil society sector, nonprofit realities as well as general information about Nigerian nonprofits. The page will be updated on a regular basis with news, pictures, and videos of project events, activities, milestones, and updates.  

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The project is intended to include peer reviews, consultations with CSOs across the country to garner opinions on regulations that they consider ideal and enabling; engagements with regulatory authorities and the National Assembly with the aim of producing a solid self-regulatory frame for Nonprofit organisations operating in Nigeria.  

This publication is produced with funding from the European Union.

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Knowledge-sharing and Commitment to Mutual Learning within the Nonprofit Space – October 2019

Knowledge-sharing and Commitment to Mutual Learning within the Nonprofit Space – Istanbul Principle VII

Nonprofits play an increasingly important role in both local and international development. With a dynamic environment fraught with uncertainties, no single nonprofit is a repository of all knowledge, hence the need for continuous learning.

To address developmental challenges, the activities of nonprofits are increasingly reliant on high-quality information and knowledge shared- necessary for organisational effectiveness and sustainability through collaborative practices.

Knowledge is the intellectual capital of any organisation and it must be said that while many nonprofits lack the critical processes and knowledge needed to help them develop, evaluate, document, and share successful programs, there is quite a number who have these capacities. Being in the space to create and share knowledge with one another while mutually committing to continuous and sustained learning is key to long term organisational effectiveness for individual organisations and the nonprofit sector at large. Part of the benefits for Civil society organisations (CSOs) involved in this kind of arrangement is the renewed capacity to execute key activities within a given time-frame.

Knowledge-sharing engenders growth within the sector especially when smaller nonprofits are privy to experiences of bigger organisations who faced down challenges in the past, learned from them and eventually delivered on their goals. Thus, various actors while working together would produce knowledge and share essential information that promotes grassroots development.

The 7th Istanbul principle of development effectiveness states – “CSOs are effective as development actors when they enhance the ways they learn from their experience, from other CSOs and development actors, integrating evidence from development practice and results, including the knowledge and wisdom of local and indigenous communities, strengthening innovation and their vision for the future they would like to see”.

CSOs need to commit to mutual learning and knowledge sharing because developmental issues can only be addressed by acting together, which is necessary for achieving collaboration and mutual learning for nonprofits. Many pressing concerns are universal, and can only be tackled by multi-sectoral collaboration and sharing mechanisms. Working together guarantees long-term prosperity for all, reduces duplicity of actions and plays a key role in informing coherent policy-making for better global impacts.

Despite the dynamics of power among nonprofits in Nigeria that hinder proper information sharing and constitute barriers to collective knowledge development, nonprofits should see themselves as partners, collaborate, share information and commit to mutual learning from all stakeholders for the good of their organisation and the society at large.

This newsletter is supported by Forus. However, the ideas and opinions presented in this document do not necessarily represent those of Forus, NNNGO or any other organisations mentioned.

Profiling Boigedacha Literary Initiative on World Telecommunication and Information Society Day

Profiling Boigedacha Literary Initiative on World Telecommunication and Information Society Day

Established to reform, restructure and revitalize the reading culture of students from primary to tertiary level through mass literacy campaign by building of libraries and reading clubs, Boigedacha Literary Initiative (BLI) was founded in Enugu State in 2010 with a mission to remain committed to effecting Sustainable Development Goal 4.

Acting as a defined positive factor in the development of educational sector in Nigeria through her literacy campaign such as building free libraries for Government primary and secondary schools, a move which thus far has birthed positive behavioral changes amongst students, BLI in the spirit of literacy campaign, collaborates with educational stakeholders and other interest groups in the development of reading culture in Nigeria.

BLI together with partners provide counseling, organize seminars and workshops for students on career guide, the foundation organizes and fosters educational programs in primary schools, colleges, higher institutions and several communities while assisting students whose parents cannot afford payment of school fees.

The foundation also engages in community development projects for socio-economic advancement of communities at large like the Reading Culture Platform which creates literacy centers in primary schools, colleges, higher institutions whileaccommodating school drop-outs and adults in the process.

Amongst BLI Activities:

*Mentoring, counseling and coaching of students in becoming the total child.

*Hosting reading and spelling competitions while teaching students how to learn using the scrabble game.

*Advocacy for the girl child education while campaigning against early marriage and championing good health as well as well-being.

*Engagement in peaceful, non-religious and non-political campaigns for national peace.

Since inception, Boigedacha Literary Initiative has organized about five reading competitions while several books have been given out to more than a hundred schools in five states including FCT Abuja, all with the aim of encouraging reading culture amongst students.

Profiling DFRHCE on World Telecommunication and Information Society Day

Profiling DFRHCE on World Telecommunication and Information Society Day

Located in the heart of Olodi Apapa, Lagos, Nigeria, Dako Foundation for Rural Healthcare and Education (DFRHCE) is a humanitarian organisation  established in 2008 and focused on improving the living conditions of disadvantaged communities in Nigeria through advocacy, education, public health measures and direct medical interventions. DAKO’s target groups include, under 5 children, women of reproductive ages, youths, People with Disabilities, People Living with HIV/AIDS and the society at large.

The Foundation’s works cut across Lagos, Edo and Imo States of Nigeria with relentless focus on rural and extremely hard to reach areas. Some of the projects implemented by DAKO foundation include:

  • Ibienafe’s School Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Project:

At Ibienafe community, South-Ibie, Edo State, Nigeria, Igebo primary school and Ibienafe community secondary school,  were most fortunate to be beneficiaries of the Information and Communication Technology project which championed the donation of ICT tools to the two community schools. Through this project, hundreds of students in Ibienafe, South-Ibie, Edo State are now computer literates while about ten primary and five secondary schools in adjourning six communities would also ultimately benefit from the laudable ICT project.

Facilities provided:

– 7 desktop computers with accessories.

– Computer desks and chairs for students.

– 5000-watt century stabilizer

– 5KVA generator for power.

–  A trained resident ICT tutor

–  Quarterly technical maintenance.

  • Biomedical HIV programmes

As part of efforts to achieve the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) on the 90–90–90 targets aimed at diagnosing 90% of all HIV-positive persons, provide antiretroviral therapy (ART) for 90% of those diagnosed and achieve viral suppression for 90% of those treated by 2020,  DAKO foundation has through a line up of activities ensured the implementation and realization of this goal in Lagos and Edo States.

Activities Include:

–  HIV Counselling and Testing

–  Referrals and contact tracing for Positive individuals

–  Information, Education and Communication (IEC) materials on HIV/AIDS

– Condom (Male and Female) demonstrations and distribution

– Advocacy on HIV prevention.

  • Medical Missions/Outreaches

General health sensitization, medical consultations and treatments, referrals/follow up, free drugs, free eye checks and glasses, vitamin A supplementation and deworming (chewable albendazole) for school children, provision of Insecticide Treated Nets, referrals and medical procedures particularly for cases requiring surgery are also part of activities embarked upon by Dako Foundation in recent times. These activities have reached well over 10,000 rural dwellers in Lagos, Edo and Imo states.

In the process, there was a record of 90 dewormed children: 90 free eye glasses; 273 general treatments; 38 distributed water treatment units; 2 distributed wheel chairs and a clutch.

  • Post Flood Disaster Intervention for Victims of Flood

The aim of this outreach which reached over 5,132 people was to alleviate the pains inflicted on flood-ravaged areas of Anegbette, Osomegbe and EkperiUdaba, Etsako Central Local Government Area of Edo State, Nigeria.

Impacts: Distributed antifungal drugs; Distributed easy to use water sanitizing units with storage; Distributed food items;Distributed clothes to community dwellers; Distributed lifesaving prenatal and post-natal multivitamin supplements to pregnant and lactating women; Vitamin A supplementation for children; Medical consultation, prescription and treatment of local prevailing diseases.

  • Free Medical Surgery

During a medical mission in Edo State, Nigeria in 2016, DFRHCE came across little Amira aged 18 months who was born with brain tumor. For four years now, Amira has been under direct sponsorship by DFRHCE with free medical care at Dako Medical Centre, Lagos, Nigeria. So far, two surgeries have been done on Amira. The first surgery was conducted in the Emirates with the aim of removing the brain tumor followed by a second surgery carried out in Nigeria to repair Cleft palate and Cleft lip.

  • Water Project

An estimated 13,000 people were reached at the construction of a 40 feet high scaffolding to carry 10,000 liters of water reservoir with underground water extension pipes and taps in two communities(Iyerekhu, South –Ibie) Edo State, Nigeria.

PRESS FREEDOM: A PRINCIPAL PILLAR TO GOOD GOVERNANCE

PRESS FREEDOM: A PRINCIPAL PILLAR TO GOOD GOVERNANCE

As the world focuses on development media, its obvious control especially on the corridors of power cannot be overlooked. For the grand health of any democracy, access to information is most essential and press Freedom, a most effective instrument for a functional democratic system acts as a foundation, a resounding expression, too important to be ignored in a democratic society.

The United Nations’ 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights states: “Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; this right includes freedom to hold opinions without interference, and impart information and ideas through any media regardless of frontiers”. Freedom of the press is the freedom of communication and expression through various media; as seen in the modern day electronic media and publications. Such freedom implies the absence of interference from over-reacting leaders. Hostility expressed by leaders towards the media incites violence, in fact it fuels fear for journalists which does not give room to act as watchdog of democracy.

So many theories have defined press freedom, the Libertarian theory, however stands as theory-friendly to the modern-day freedom of the press, it argued that media does not need to be controlled because people would naturally follow their conscience, engage in public debate and create a better life for themselves.

According to Lyman Tower Sargent an American professor of political science, he opined that the seven types of liberty that compose a democratic ideology are: The right to vote; Freedom of speech; Freedom of the press; Freedom of assembly; Freedom of religion; Freedom of movement and Freedom from arbitrary treatment by the political and legal system.

This year’s global theme for World Press Freedom Day is “Media for Democracy: Journalism and Elections in Times of Disinformation”. Information is power, hence it must be timely, concise, clear and reliable. As powerful as information is, it must be curtailed to some point such that false information does not degenerate to Hate Speech or related offences. Currently in Nigeria, any person who publishes defamatory matter is liable to one-year imprisonment, where the person who publishes the defamatory matter and aware that it is false is liable to two years imprisonment.

In line with goal 16 of the SDGs which aims to promote peaceful and inclusive societies based on respect for human rights, the rule of law, accountability and transparency, the United Nations General Assembly hence declared May 3rd as World Press Freedom Day to raise awareness of the importance of freedom of the press and remind governments of their duty to respect and uphold the right to freedom of expression enshrined under Article 19 of the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights with a close reminder to the entire world that in dozens of countries, several publications still remain censored, fined and suspended; while investigative journalists, editors and publishers are continuously harassed, attacked, detained and even murdered in extreme pursuit of stories.

According to the World Press Freedom Index, released by Reporters Without Borders, every year, RWB (2019) establishes a ranking of countries in terms of their freedom of the press. Norway remains still the country with the best press freedom in the world followed by Finland and Sweden ranked second and third on the index, respectively. Netherlands, Denmark, Switzerland, New Zealand and Jamaica also ranked top. Several authoritarian regimes have fallen in the Index.  The countries with the least degree of press freedom are China, Eritrea, North Korea and Turkmenistan.

Since the inception of this index in 2013, many African countries have struggled to climb up the ladder. In 2016, Nigeria recorded a decline on the world ranking, falling from 111 to 116; 2018 was no better, the country recorded another fall, moving from 116 to 119 out of 180 countries, year 2019 records 120 on the Index. This is indeed sad.

New record shows that eight journalists have been killed across the world in 2017, while more than 193 are currently imprisoned. Although Nigerian journalists are not so included on death lists. However, Journalists continue to face harassment without protection of the law even in Nigeria. Journalists are often times threatened, subjected to physical violence and even denied access to information by government officials, police officers and sometimes even the public.

Need we be reminded that if the press is constantly controlled, its ability to investigate and expose corruption, bribery, mismanagement, waste, embezzlement and other vices in democratic societies might just be truncated.

Yet again, according to libertarian theory on press freedom, the theory prescribes that an individual should be free to publish what he likes, holding and expressing his or her opinion freely. Obviously, libertarian theory advocates that the press must be seen as partner with government in search of the truth, rather than a tool in the hands of government, a good guide for media practitioners in their quest to helping nations, particularly developing nations grow. While The Social Responsibility Theory opines that the media have obligations to the society, owing them truth and objectivity, the media must ensure to religiously follow agreed codes of ethics and professional conducts to safeguarding public interest.

“Press freedom is the cornerstone of democratic societies. All states, all Nations, are strengthened by information, debate and the exchange of opinions. At a time of growing discourse of mistrust and delegitimization of the press and journalism, it is essential that we guarantee freedom of opinion through the free exchange of ideas and information based on factual truth” Audrey Azoulay, Director-General of UNESCO.

 

 

THE PASSION THAT CONNECTS- Celebrating Sports for Development and Peace

THE PASSION THAT CONNECTS- Celebrating Sports for Development and Peace

In the last two decades, there has been a concerted effort to re-mobilize sport as a vehicle for broad, sustainable social development, especially in the most disadvantaged communities in the world.

According to WIKIPEDIA, sports include all forms of competitive, physical activity which through casual or organized participation, aim to use, maintain or improve physical ability and skills while providing entertainment for spectators.

The UN system also defines sports in the context of development and peace as all forms of physical activity that contribute to physical fitness, mental well-being and social interaction, such as play, recreation, organized or competitive sport, indigenous sports and games for the attainment of specific development and peace objectives.

For centuries, the role and impact of sports in the society has been a subject of debate. For some observers, sport is a physical activity always associated with competition among teams or nations for the pride and glory of winning, while for some it is a sort of pure entertainment.

Sports; games and physical activities are present in virtually every society, its popularity transcends political, national and ideological borders. While it remains the most unifying and networking tool for peace in the world, sport is a passion shared by women and men world over. It is a force for physical well-being and social empowerment. Research reveals that since the advent of Olympics in 1896, more athletes have come to agree that sports unite the world.

Football for instance, the most popular game in the world, is estimated by FIFA in 2007 to be played by about 2 billion people, while other games such as cricket, basketball and baseball, attract the interest of millions more worldwide.

2005 saw the establishment of the United Nations Office for Sport, Development and Peace (UNOSDP), with an objective to raise awareness about the use of physical activity, sport and play as powerful development tools in the advancement of development and peace.

UNESCO also indicates that to achieve the goals of peace and development, it is important to recognize the cultural dimensions of sport. Additionally, several agencies within the UN system (UNDP, WHO, ILO, IOM) also use sport as a factor in their projects for peace and development, hence the declaration of 6th April as the International Day of Sport for Development and Peace, to celebrate the contribution of sports and physical activity to education, human development, healthy lifestyles and a peaceful world.

The international Day of Sport for Development and Peace is a day when some of the world’s sports’ finest work together with community sports with the aim of enriching the lives of children and youth world over.

In more recent years, the use of sport to tackle issues related to equality and social justice emerged as a response from different sectors to even instances of violence and intolerance especially in most disadvantaged communities in the world while promoting good education, quality health-care, development and peace in its wake.

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development further reveals and acknowledges sport’s role for social progress: it clearly emphasizes the need for developed countries in aiding developing countries to achieve a “global partnership for development” and sport is definitely one good source of this partnership.

Further studies conducted by The Population Council and Harvard School of Public Health, evidenced the importance of sports through development and its positive effects on children and youth. These studies have also documented grassroots soccer model’s effectiveness in significantly improving students’ knowledge, attitudes, communication and decision-making skills.

This progress so much so influenced FIFA to launch the Football for Hope initiative in 2005 to help improve the lives of youth world over.

WHAT SPORTS CAN DO FOR YOU

  • Playing sports helps reduce body fat and controls body weight.
  • Sports can help you fight depression and anxiety.
  • Sports allows you to challenge yourself and set goals.
  • Sports help aid coordination, balance and flexibility.
  • Sports can help improve stamina and concentration.
  • Sports allow you to experience the highs and lows of winning and losing
  • Sports are a great way of bonding with families and friends.
  • If you are into sports, you are more likely to have a healthy life.

Every year, physical inactivity leads to an estimated 3.2 million deaths. This is why UNESCO joined forces with the World Health Organization to combat sedentary lifestyles, starting with quality and inclusive physical education for all youths which has considerable benefited children and youth in several countries.

In many countries, opportunities to participate in sports are limited by significant infrastructural, social and political barriers. For example, people with disabilities are marginalized in many societies, thus preventing their active involvement in sports.

And so as the world stays true to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, the world must do all to support sport to ensuring no one is left behind. Sport leaders and lovers must be ready to demonstrate commitment to creating a better world, despite shortcomings like geographic and social barriers.

Regardless of age, gender or ethnicity, we cannot take away the special love the world has for sports, it is enjoyed by all and sundry, sports build self-esteem, physical and mental health and nurtures positive connections with many.

The rights of every person to engage in sports must be respected and should be enforced worldwide. Government, Corporate Bodies, public and private sectors must all come together to create a world for sports which must not only be considered as a form of entertainment but rather an important investment in our present and our future for a lasting peace and development.

 Jaldhaara Foundation on World Water Day

At Jaldhaara Foundation, it is everything freshwater. Jaldhaara Foundation’s slogan ‘Quenching A Bigger Thirst Nigeria’ speaks volume on the essential need of water for all Nigerians.

With the foundation’s 5-point Agenda, JF aims to make available fresh water for left-behind communities in Nigeria.

Incorporated to remediate the problems in the areas of Safe Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH), JF has been able to streamline the percentage of those who are short of fresh water while vigorously working on a quick and effective impact as regards clean water.

By 2020, Jaldhaara Foundation plans to drive the WASH objectives in a large number of communities by implementing sustainable WASH solutions in over two thousand (2,000) communities and by building preference for safe water, sanitation and hygienic practices in unaddressed, isolated and marginalized communities.

By virtue of expansion and in the bid to make fresh water accessible to all, Jaldhaara Foundation together with an established strong partnership with Water Health Nigeria and other related organizations intend to have a structured phase approach which is meant to address the life cycle of water management (i.e. water provision, purification and waste water management) to the marginalized communities, which include: communities and habitations that are underserved and face significant water contamination.

*Jaldhaara Foundation will provide safe drinking water access to these communities through the conventional model i.e. a WHC.

*About 140 communities will definitely have safe water access.

The intention also extends to installation of 140 WHCs across various communities in Nigeria which would mean that more than 4 million people will have safe water access which would automatically result in the reduction of waterborne disease with an increase in annual savings in households due to reduction in medical expenses.

World Tuberculosis Day with Abraham’s Children Foundation

World Tuberculosis Day with Abraham’s Children Foundation

On World Tuberculosis (TB) day, Olaife Ilori speaks with Victor Dorawa Koreyo, Executive Director, Abraham’s Children Foundation. Here is what he has to say about TB, its causes, symptoms and available treatment:

 

*What is TB?

Tuberculosis (also known as “TB”) is a disease caused by a type of bacteria called Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

*What is the difference between TB infection and TB disease?

Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by a germ called Mycobacterium tuberculosis that is spread from person to person through the air. TB usually affects the lungs, but it can also affect other parts of the body, such as the brain, kidneys and the spine. It is very important to note that the TB infection is different from the TB disease.

Persons with TB infection do not feel sick and do not have any symptoms. They are infected with M. tuberculosis, but do not have TB disease. The only sign of TB infection is a positive reaction to the tuberculin skin test or TB blood test. So while persons with TB infection are not infectious and cannot spread TB infection to others, the TB disease is infectious and can be spread from one person to another.

*Is TB disease dangerous?

Tuberculosis Disease has been plaguing humankind for thousands of years; it has been and still one of the deadliest infectious diseases in the world.

*How common is the TB disease?

About one-quarter of the world’s population has latent TB, which means people have been infected by TB bacteria. People infected with TB bacteria have a 5–15% lifetime risk of falling ill with TB.

*What is “smear-negative” TB?

Although patients with sputum smear–negative, can transmit infection, indeed, but they have been presumed to be far less infectious than patients who are sputum smear–positive. However, quantitative data are limited regarding the proportion of TB transmission that is attributable to patients with smear-negative.

 

*What is a TB contact?

Tuberculosis (TB) contact means having close contact with patients with infectious TB. As they are at high risk of infecting non-patients (and in line with the End TB strategy), TB contacts should be investigated systematically and actively for TB infection and disease so it does not spread.

 

*What is TB exposure?

You may have been exposed to TB bacteria if you have spent time with someone with TB disease. The TB bacteria goes into the air when a person with active TB disease of the lungs or throat coughs, sneezes, speaks, or sings.

*What are the symptoms of TB?

  • Coughing that lasts three or more weeks.
  • Coughing up blood.
  • Weight loss.
  • Fatigue.
  • Fever.

*How does TB spread?

TB is spread through the air from one person to another. The bacteria are put into the air when a person with TB disease of the lungs or throat coughs, sneezes, speaks, or sings. People nearby may breathe in these bacteria and become infected. However, not everyone infected with TB bacteria becomes sick.

*Do You Think TB Patients Need to Be Put in Isolation?

Persons who have or are suspected of having TB disease should be placed in an area away from other patients without the disease, preferably in an airborne infection isolation room.

*What is the incubation period of TB disease?

The incubation period of TB disease may vary, but it is usually from 2 to 12 weeks.

*What tests determine whether a person has Tb? are those tests safe for pregnant women?

A positive TB skin test or TB blood test tells that a person has been infected with TB bacteria. It does not tell whether the person has latent TB infection (LTBI) or has progressed to TB disease. Other tests, such as a chest x-ray and a sample of sputum, are needed to see whether the person has TB disease.

TB skin testing is considered both valid and safe throughout pregnancy. TB blood tests also are safe to use during pregnancy, but have not been evaluated for diagnosing TB infection in pregnant women.

*How best should TB Disease be treated?

Treating TB takes longer than treating other types of bacterial diseases. However, for active tuberculosis, the treatment usually consists of a combination of TB drugs that must be taken for at least 6 months. But the treatment will only be successful if the drugs are taken exactly as required for the entire length of time.

*What is DOT and why use DOT?

Directly Observed Treatment(DOT) is the name given to the tuberculosis (TB) control strategy recommended by the World Health Organization. According to WHO, “The most cost-effective way to stop the spread of TB in communities with a high incidence is by curing it through Directly Observed Treatment.

*According to World Health Organization (WHO), between 2000-2014, approximately 43 million lives were saved through diagnosis and treatment. In what way is your organization helping to ensure this disease is kept under wrap?

A massive challenge glares us all in Nigeria especially with the high rate of this disease. That I am wearied beholding the burden even in a community like (Afikpo North Local Government Area of Ebonyi State) is an understatement. As an NGO, we want to redefine the Nigerian health care through speedy treatment of malaria, HIV/AIDS and especially TB. Results of our impactful services in partnership with Afikpo North in the area of TB control is quite encouraging already and i am sure with this step in the right direction, TB Disease will be eradicated by 2030 hopefully.