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Learn how the Nigeria Network of NGOs is helping its members and nonprofits with Covid-19 (coronavirus)

Category: International observances

Remarks on International Workers’ Day

Remarks on International Workers’ Day

01 May 2020

 

Today has a particularly important meaning for us as individuals working or volunteering in the nonprofit sector. As we reflect on our contributions to the country, our efforts in helping to curb the spread of Covid-19 and maintain support to the vulnerable population whom we traditionally serve, I am grateful to the hardworking men and women who work in the sector, earning next to nothing, under very tight working conditions, deadlines and lean resources to give hope to millions of people in communities across the country.

As one who has worked all his life in the sector, starting as a volunteer and gradually moving up the ladder into full staff, I understand first-hand the goodwill that comes with working with nonprofit organisations as well as the downsides. That is why as part of my work in the coming months, I will be convening a nonprofit staff forum to discuss issues you face and create together some fun-filled activities to celebrate our work and the value we bring to the development landscape in Nigeria and across the world.

Certainly, it will take a while for our world to return to normal. More than ever before, we will now need a more dedicated and resilient workforce that will help deliver post-Covid responses across the country alongside our normal programming before the pandemic.

I hope I can count on you to stay safe and committed to bringing development to the doorsteps of the common man.

Thank you for all you do!

Oyebisi, B. Oluseyi
Executive Director, Nigeria Network of NGOs.

Profiling The Irede Foundation (TIF) on International Day of Persons with Disability 2019.

Profiling The Irede Foundation (TIF) on International Day of Persons with Disability 2019.

Amputation surgery is an orthopedic surgical procedure carried out as the last resort, when limb salvage is not feasible. It is usually associated with social, emotional and psychological disturbances to patients and their families.

The incidence of amputation in populations have a base figure of 1-2 amputees per 1000 people for all causes combined. Some causes include: trauma (34%); malignant tumours (14.5%); diabetics (12.3%); infections (5.1%); peripheral artery disease (2.1%); and burns (2.1%).

Limb loss is much more common than many people realize, and its numbers, growing by the day. It is sad to know that statistics on the numbers of amputees especially in the developing world are staggering. Globally, there are more than 1 million annual limb amputations -— one every 30 seconds.

The estimated prevalence of extremity amputation in Nigeria is 1.6 per 100,000. Reports have revealed that the number is expected to double by 2050, which will by the way be faster than population growth. Meanwhile, limb loss isn’t just costly in the financial sense; it is expensive psychologically too.  According to research, approximately 30% of people with limb loss suffer from depression, anxiety, or both. While the demands on prosthesis in third world countries are often more difficult to meet than in developed countries, one way many organisations have lent their hands(giving their widow’s mite) is in the number of artificial limbs that they have been able to deliver particularly to the less privileged in the society.

As a provider of care and prosthesis for those suffering from limb loss, The Irede Foundation understands the peculiarity of this situation and in their own little way have ensured that if not all,  at least,  some are not left behind even in their bid to making children walk,  run and play again.

In this light,  The Irede Foundation focuses on working with child amputees to give them hope and help them live a fulfilled life. The foundation is able to achieve this feat by educating the general public, while also encouraging caregivers and empowering indigent children between ages 0-18 with artificial limbs.

Activities Include:

Limb Empowerment Programme: This program sorts for child amputees whether through congenital limb loss or through trauma, providing them with prosthetic limbs from first contact to age 18. With the goal to extend their voices globally, TIF organizes an annual 2km advocacy walk tagged “Out on a Limb”. The 2019 Walk was themed “ Ensuring Inclusiveness” for children and persons living with a disability. The Walk happens simultaneously across Nigeria.

For TIF, year 2019 has been full of eventful and worthy activities and achievements. TIF 2019 Achievements include:

* Limb Empowerment Programme: The Irede Foundation has been able to empower 21 child amputees with artificial limbs in the year 2019. Cumulatively, TIF has thus far empowered 99 child amputees with 136 limbs across 17  states in the 6 geo-political zones of the country.

* Out On A Limb: Recorded successful walks across 17 states in Nigeria and 7 global locations and recorded over 1,000 people in attendance with an indirect reach of 10,000.

*Media Feature:  Few months ago,  The Irede Foundation got featured on the top two Global Media Houses: CNN and BBC

In the bid to tell the world the story of Irede,  The CNN Changemaker captured the activities of the Foundation through the eyes and voice of the Executive Director as well as the full coverage  of Prosthetic Production (http://bit.ly/IREDECNN)

The BBC African Voices was also able to focus their lenses on people who have become  beneficiaries of the Foundation. http://bit.ly/IREDEBBC

The Irede Foundation is not about ready to relent in their service to humanity, TIF wants communities to be on the lookout and refer that child amputee who is in dire need of a prosthesis to The Irede Foundation, for at the Foundation, they  believe goodness has come to every amputee child that steps into their Foundation.

 

Profiling Sparkle Foundation on World Toilet Day

Profiling Sparkle Foundation on World Toilet Day

Some go to streams, some visit the bushes. Meanwhile in the process of doing this serious business, some, sadly have been bitten by reptiles.

One major outcome of the lack of sanitation facilities is open defecation, which according to some experts results in waterborne diseases outbreak such as dysentery and cholera particularly amongst children.

According to Nigeria Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Reports, the country’s sanitation sector is in near epileptic condition. It is with this aim to achieving SDG 6 for cleaner environments together with building some self-reliance, socio-economic development and improved physical wellbeing with great hope for a brighter future, Sparkle Foundation for orphans and the less privileged sees to the provision of health and educational support to the poor particularly in rural communities.

Health-concerned foundation that they are known for, Sparkle also encourages family planning for an effective birth control in several communities. Still on family planning, the Foundation partnered with NURHI (Nigerian Urban Reproductive Health Initiative) in other to create awareness on Family planning through sensitization. Sparkle Foundation was able to register 217 women for preferred methods; ranging from MICROGYNON, DEPO INJECTION, NORISTERAT INJECTION, IMPLANON and JADELLE. For the effectiveness of this sensitization, Sparkle ensured to distribute about 1,068 male and female condoms.

Sparkle has also successfully carried out various health awareness programs for children and youths; from drug abuse to mental health to basic hygiene.

At Sparkle Foundation, they believe every child through improved nutritional status and reduced physical ailments can achieve his/her potentials which can help create a viable sound future.

OTHER ACHIEVEMENTS INCLUDE:

  • Supported visual abilities of children by providing 150 children with eye drops and prescribed reading glasses to 21 children.
  • Renovation of 16 toilets for pupils and 2 Teachers’ toilets which has finally put an end to open defecation at Makoko Primary School in Lagos State.
  • Supported 2,200 families of children with food items through our Christmas Give Away, as part of our support to end hunger and malnutrition.
Profiling Food Basket International Foundation on World Food Day- FOOD FOR ALL  

Profiling Food Basket International Foundation on World Food Day- FOOD FOR ALL  

Without balanced diet, medications become ineffective and even dangerous to the sick. Without food, children cannot learn well in schools; without food, the labor force can never be productive and effective, and without food on the table, several tasks will definitely be left undone.

Agriculture in Nigeria is a branch of the Nigeria’s economy that provides employment to about 30% of the population as at 2010 and contributes to over 25 percent of its Gross Domestic Product. Prior to the Nigerian civil war, the country churned out agricultural produce that sustained its population, however, but after the discovery of crude oil, agriculture unfortunately transformed to a neglected statue.

With core values of compassion and love for humanity, Food Basket Foundation International (FBFI), the very first indigenous nutrition-focused foundation in Nigeria founded in 1989 with the singular mission of helping low income families, particularly the vulnerable. FBFI through the years has provided interventions and services with the aims of alleviating the effects of poverty, promoting nutritious practices geared towards food security, and providing means of developing secured sustainable livelihood to the hungry.

FBFI continues to work, at the grassroots, alleviating the effects of poverty on vulnerable populations in a sustainable way; providing nutrition, education and acting as a bridge between those who need the assistance and those who can make the requisite changes to the policies that will make nutrition, food security and sustainable agriculture achievable for healthy lifestyle.

FBFI, going all the way to mitigate the effects of poverty, malnutrition, poor health and disease conditions in Nigeria through innovations is also in total readiness to assist low income families within the sub-Saharan African region to obtain a sustainable livelihood system, which would reduce poverty, malnutrition, disease and infant mortality rate.

With a focused target audience who randomly fall in the range of women, children and youths, these groups are currently provided with small-scale farming at Community-Based Technology Transfer Centre (CTTC), with the sole purpose to gaining access to new and innovative technologies for increased production and provision of nutritional services.

FBFI has provided nutrition education services to several communities – including Aremo community in Ibadan. FBFI organizes feeding programmes in Kaduna, Jigawa, Katsina, Kebbi, Osun and Oyo States. The Foundation, at some point also facilitated the implementation of the Case Study on the Efficacy of Nutrition on Infants and Young Children.

Despite the numerous humanitarian projects, some other achievements include: Implementing Gender Informed Nutrition and Agriculture (GINA) project; the use of integrated agriculture and nutrition interventions to improve the nutritional situation of vulnerable groups, particularly children under age five; Accelerating Vitamin A supplementation (VAS) through Child Health Weeks in Ogun and Osun states in collaboration with Micronutritient Initiative (2006-2011); Developed HIV/AIDS and Nutrition training manual for agricultural extension workers in partnership with the Federal Ministry of Agriculture; Capacity building via Nutrition Education in Nutritional Care and Support for caretakers of OVCs and PLWHA in Plateau, Edo, Kaduna, Nassarawa, Kogi States and the Federal Capital Territory; Adaptation of curriculum modules focused on improving nutrition through home gardens for the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO); Community-Based and Participatory poverty reduction planning, programe.

The Food Basket Foundation International supports the international community towards achieving the global Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and has been able to successfully complete a large number of field studies and publications focused on nutrition, maternal-child health, agriculture, sustainable livelihoods and poverty reduction in Nigeria, facilitated training of street food vendors; provided water through deep wells and toilet facilities in several villages in the Akinyele local government area of Ibadan, Oyo State.

GirlForce: Unscripted and Unstoppable.

GirlForce: Unscripted and Unstoppable.

In spite of the numerous efforts by stakeholders to promote the girl-child education especially in Africa, Nigeria is still ranked among one of the countries with the highest number of girls with no access to formal education. In the instances when girls do get into school, a good number do not have the opportunity to complete primary education.

Increased efforts and initiatives of individuals and organisations advocating for the education of the girl child in any society transcends just personal development for the female gender; such investments ultimately position the society for positive transformation and change.

While poverty remains the most important factor for determining whether a girl can access education, studies consistently reinforce that girls who face multiple disadvantages such as low family income, living in remote or under-served locations or disability — are farthest behind in terms of access to and completion of education.

The Purple Girl Foundation (PGF), provides educational support, health coverage, as well as leadership and peer learning opportunities to under-served girls from indigent families to improve their prospects for the future. Borne out of a desire to provide opportunities for enhancing education for the girl-child, the foundation’s main function is; providing educational support to female children from indigent families at the primary, secondary and tertiary levels.

For future offerings, the foundation will focus on female children from indigent families in Lagos, Delta and Akwa-Ibom states. With this, PGF seeks to improve future prospects and opportunities for the girl-child through the following activities:

  • Full scholarships for young girls at the primary, secondary and tertiary levels with benefactors selected across public and low-cost schools for full academic sessions.
  • Provision of financial support to cater to feeding, stationery, examinations, uniforms and other miscellaneous expenses for the period of their education.
  • Provision of health coverage for all beneficiaries across primary, secondary and tertiary school levels.
  • Partner with training institutions to facilitate sessions on character development and peer learning for young girls.

TEACHING: The Past, Present and Future

On World Teachers’ Day (2019), UNESCO has adopted the theme: “Young Teachers: The Future of the Profession.”

The day provides the occasion to celebrate the teaching profession worldwide, to take stock of achievements and to address some of the issues central for attracting and keeping the brightest minds and young talents in the profession.

According to a new UNESCO Institute for Statistics’ paper, several developing countries are struggling to recruit, retain and train enough teachers to keep up with a large and growing school population. The paper further states that globally, about 263 million children and youths are out of school, including 25 million children of primary-school age. Meanwhile, in developing countries, just about 14% of youths complete upper secondary education; a disheartening percentage.

Teaching, according to some professors, is a conscious behavior that makes learning more probable and efficient such that teachers become and remain architects of all professions. It is estimated that to achieve the goal of universal primary education by 2020, countries will need to recruit a total of 24.4 million primary teachers and 44.4 million secondary teachers over the next 12 years, an important step towards quality education and sustainable society.

Education, a fundamental human right which is indispensable for the achievement of sustainable development requires quality teachers. Quality teachers who per time can transform their students to scientists, doctors, engineers and several noble professions regardless of relatively low income.

The noble profession combined with their qualities should not be ignored nor undermined for they are essential to the achievement of professionalism and sustainable development. Teachers are known to shape the minds of youths, making significant differences in their communities such that lives become more impacted even at limited speed.

While teaching is a special occupation, few do it effectively, playing pivotal roles in the school of transformation. While many are most incompetent, poor teaching of some peculiar subjects have shattered the hopes of many students who could not comprehend the tutorials, hence the need for educated young minds.

The ‘Born Teachers’ insistence on perfection has shaped many lives tremendously, acknowledging their pupils’ needs and addressing them albeit their challenges. Their compelling guidance to obey parents, respect elders, leaders, and to fear God, are golden teachings forever treasured, coupled with the established fact that teachers should show exemplary leadership skills in the upbringing of every child which also emphasizes on another fact that teachers either make or mar the end product of the noble profession.

They play pivotal parental roles and continue to do so even in the lives of their pupils. Taking care of one or two children is never an easy task in homes, let alone a teacher to about 30 pupils or more. It is recognized that teachers are not only a means to implementing educational goals, they also are keys to sustainability and national capacity in achieving learning and creating societies based on knowledge, values and ethics. They however continue to face challenges of poor training, low income and staff shortage.

Added to the challenge of numbers is one quality all too often, teachers are found working without resources or proper training. According to the UNESCO Institute for Statistics, the quality of education in many countries is undermined by a deficit of teachers. About 1.4 million teachers are missing in classrooms which are needed to achieve Universal Primary Education, the fourth goal being quality education.

For the future of this noble profession, researches reveal that teacher shortages in sub-Saharan Africa is the highest worldwide, it reveals a growing need of about 17 million teachers to achieve universal primary and secondary education by 2030. According to Teachers Registration Council Of Nigeria, Nigeria has just about two million qualified and registered teachers, with recorded statistics that the country will always be in need of 250,000 teachers annually to cater to the growing population of pupils.

While it is noted that some government owned schools can only boast of very few qualified teachers. Statistics reveal that West Africa has a growing need of about 7 million school teachers; unfortunately, Nigeria carries a massive chunk of that number. This is because the country has the largest out of school children, thus the urgent need of large number of qualified teachers.

Global Thematic Consultation on Education states several essentials for supporting teachers’ effectiveness which include: good conditions of employment, appropriate contracts and salaries, prospects for career progression and promotion; good conditions in the work environment, creating school contexts that are conducive for teaching and quality training for teachers.

At this juncture, action calls for international communities, governments and individuals to unite to produce and support teachers who can qualitatively teach and motivate students, especially in countries where the highest numbers of out-of-school children exist, while capacity building is also needful for the enhancement and sustainability of the quality of teachers in line with global best practices of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Teachers have proven to be pupils’ angels and of all very challenging professions, one of the hardest is being a good teacher. Safe to write that if students have not learned then the teachers have not in any way taught, therefore for optimum teaching to take place there is need for teachers to be well trained, equipped and very well paid.

Creating Awareness about Hepatitis on World Hepatitis Day

Creating Awareness about Hepatitis on World Hepatitis Day

                                                                                  LOVE YOUR LIVER

A major global public health challenge, endemic in many parts of the world, with the highest prevalence in sub-Saharan Africa and East Asia, the Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infects more than 300 million people worldwide and is a common cause of liver disease and liver cancer. Viral hepatitis is the seventh leading cause of death globally, making it a silent killer and responsible for about 1.44 million deaths annually. Often times, many adults infected with the virus recover, but 5 to10 % are unable to clear the virus thus becoming chronically infected.

Hepatitis is an inflammatory condition of the liver, commonly caused by a viral infection. However, there are other possible causes of hepatitis; autoimmune hepatitis and hepatitis that occurs as a secondary result of medications, drugs, toxins, and alcohol. Autoimmune hepatitis occurs when the body makes antibodies against liver tissue while Hepatitis B is an infection caused by the hepatitis B virus. The virus is found in the blood and body fluids of an infected person and could be spread through unprotected sex with an infected person or sharing sharp objects with infected persons.

In 2015, hepatitis B resulted in 887,000 deaths, mostly from complications and 2,850,000 were recorded to be newly infected in 2017.  About two-thirds of patients with acute HBV infection sometimes have a mild illness that usually goes undetected, until the person becomes seriously ill from the virus. While the hepatitis B virus can survive outside the body for at least 7 days, it has an incubation period of up to 75 days and maybe detected within 30 to 60 days after infection which by then could develop into chronic hepatitis B with symptoms comprising, a general sick feeling, diarrhea, aches and pains, high temperature, loss of appetite, lethargy, abdominal pain, jaundice and dark urine.

The 5 types of viral hepatitis include hepatitis A, B, C, D, and E. Hepatitis A is always an acute, short-term disease, Hepatitis E is usually acute but can be particularly dangerous in pregnant women. Causes of noninfectious hepatitis include alcohol and some toxins.

In Africa, chronic viral hepatitis affects over 70 million Africans; 60 million with Hepatitis B and 10 million with Hepatitis C. Sadly, the disease affects the most youthful and productive Africans, causing catastrophic financial liability in its treatment.

Nigeria is one of the countries with the highest population in the world; with children and young adults constituting the bulk of these numbers. It is important to note that the commonest cause of liver disease in Nigeria is Hepatitis B and although pregnant women are generally considered at a lower risk for HBV infection, the rate of infected pregnant women as high as 11%, have been reported in southern parts of the country. In 2016, the Federal Government affirmed that over 22.6 million Nigerians lived with Hepatitis, with about 30% unaware of their status.

It is most important that knowledge around the Hepatitis disease and how best to eradicate it is shared by everyone. World Hepatitis Day is one of eight official global public health campaigns marked by the World Health Organization and the theme for this year’s World Hepatitis Day is ‘Invest in Eliminating Hepatitis’, highlighting the need for governments around the world to take active steps towards combating the virus.

Coordinating a global response to hepatitis has paved way to finding cure for hepatitis C and treatment and vaccine for hepatitis B. Interestingly, vaccine against hepatitis B has been available since 1982 and the vaccine is 95% effective in preventing infection and the development of chronic disease and liver cancer, chronic hepatitis B infection can thus be treated with medications including safe and effective vaccines ensuring millions do not suffer anymore. Because Hepatitis affects everyone, everywhere and much closer than we think, as humans, let us begin to love our livers so we could have healthier and longer lives.

Although, Nigeria has embarked on a journey to finding a cure by registering hepatitis-related cases, adopting universal vaccination, screening all donated blood, implementing policies aimed at prevention of mother to child infections and ensuring that all infants receive the hepatitis B vaccine immediately after birth, preferably within 24 hours, there is still a lot more to be done.

For you to love your liver and be able to live longer, you must know, prevent, test and be sure to treat Hepatitis. While care is aimed at maintaining comfort and adequate nutritional balance, including replacement of fluids lost from vomiting and diarrhea, it is important to encourage prevention through vaccination.

Profiling CRAPI on Children’s Day

Profiling CRAPI on Children’s Day

Child’s Rights Advancement and Protection Initiatives (CRAPI) is committed to the cause of children. Strengthening social and emotional competence in children, CRAPI Foundation creates an enabling environment where children’s rights are upheld, the foundation helps children grow to their full potential so they can advance and in turn transform their families and the society at large.

Ensuring this transformation sees the light of day, CRAPI designs, monitors and implements policies and programs which are meant to foster the growth and personality development of these children. For children in Lagos and Abia States, CRAPI sensitizes them through enlightenment programmes, making them aware about their various rights.

Some of CRAPI’s achievements include:

  • Parents Stand Up Against Child Sexual Abuse Project in collaboration with Ministry of Women Affairs, Abia State.
  • Combating Child Human Trafficking and Child Labour: This project is implemented in collaboration with NAPTIP and Ogunbela Avenue/Fola Ojikutu Residents Association in Lagos.
  • Production and Distribution of hand Books
  • No Baby In Prison Project: It targets the release of pregnant women and nursing mothers in Prisons- with a total of 40 pregnant women and nursing mothers having benefited from this program in Lagos and Abia State
  • Advocacy and Litigation of non-implementation of child’s rights Law in Abia state.
  • Girl Child Project: Safe & Sound Transition to Womanhood 1& 2.
  • Workshop on girls handling developmental changes and challenges. This workshop has resulted in the publication and distribution of the handbook, The Red Affairs, Every girl’s handbook in collaboration with LadyCare and MOWA (Lagos and Abia State).
  • SPEAK UP and SAY NO TO BAD TOUCH Projects: At implementation, these two projects has enabled visitations to about 10 schools in Lagos state by experts and the CRAPI foundation with the aim of reaching out to schools to sensitize school children about sexual abuses and the need to break the silence among victims while providing support that is required for rehabilitation.

Other programmes embarked upon by CRAPI include;

  • Zero Tolerance for Babies in Prison in Imo and Abia States.
  • Bracing up to the Fight against Sexual Abuse.

 

Profiling Boigedacha Literary Initiative on World Telecommunication and Information Society Day

Profiling Boigedacha Literary Initiative on World Telecommunication and Information Society Day

Established to reform, restructure and revitalize the reading culture of students from primary to tertiary level through mass literacy campaign by building of libraries and reading clubs, Boigedacha Literary Initiative (BLI) was founded in Enugu State in 2010 with a mission to remain committed to effecting Sustainable Development Goal 4.

Acting as a defined positive factor in the development of educational sector in Nigeria through her literacy campaign such as building free libraries for Government primary and secondary schools, a move which thus far has birthed positive behavioral changes amongst students, BLI in the spirit of literacy campaign, collaborates with educational stakeholders and other interest groups in the development of reading culture in Nigeria.

BLI together with partners provide counseling, organize seminars and workshops for students on career guide, the foundation organizes and fosters educational programs in primary schools, colleges, higher institutions and several communities while assisting students whose parents cannot afford payment of school fees.

The foundation also engages in community development projects for socio-economic advancement of communities at large like the Reading Culture Platform which creates literacy centers in primary schools, colleges, higher institutions whileaccommodating school drop-outs and adults in the process.

Amongst BLI Activities:

*Mentoring, counseling and coaching of students in becoming the total child.

*Hosting reading and spelling competitions while teaching students how to learn using the scrabble game.

*Advocacy for the girl child education while campaigning against early marriage and championing good health as well as well-being.

*Engagement in peaceful, non-religious and non-political campaigns for national peace.

Since inception, Boigedacha Literary Initiative has organized about five reading competitions while several books have been given out to more than a hundred schools in five states including FCT Abuja, all with the aim of encouraging reading culture amongst students.

Profiling DFRHCE on World Telecommunication and Information Society Day

Profiling DFRHCE on World Telecommunication and Information Society Day

Located in the heart of Olodi Apapa, Lagos, Nigeria, Dako Foundation for Rural Healthcare and Education (DFRHCE) is a humanitarian organisation  established in 2008 and focused on improving the living conditions of disadvantaged communities in Nigeria through advocacy, education, public health measures and direct medical interventions. DAKO’s target groups include, under 5 children, women of reproductive ages, youths, People with Disabilities, People Living with HIV/AIDS and the society at large.

The Foundation’s works cut across Lagos, Edo and Imo States of Nigeria with relentless focus on rural and extremely hard to reach areas. Some of the projects implemented by DAKO foundation include:

  • Ibienafe’s School Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Project:

At Ibienafe community, South-Ibie, Edo State, Nigeria, Igebo primary school and Ibienafe community secondary school,  were most fortunate to be beneficiaries of the Information and Communication Technology project which championed the donation of ICT tools to the two community schools. Through this project, hundreds of students in Ibienafe, South-Ibie, Edo State are now computer literates while about ten primary and five secondary schools in adjourning six communities would also ultimately benefit from the laudable ICT project.

Facilities provided:

– 7 desktop computers with accessories.

– Computer desks and chairs for students.

– 5000-watt century stabilizer

– 5KVA generator for power.

–  A trained resident ICT tutor

–  Quarterly technical maintenance.

  • Biomedical HIV programmes

As part of efforts to achieve the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) on the 90–90–90 targets aimed at diagnosing 90% of all HIV-positive persons, provide antiretroviral therapy (ART) for 90% of those diagnosed and achieve viral suppression for 90% of those treated by 2020,  DAKO foundation has through a line up of activities ensured the implementation and realization of this goal in Lagos and Edo States.

Activities Include:

–  HIV Counselling and Testing

–  Referrals and contact tracing for Positive individuals

–  Information, Education and Communication (IEC) materials on HIV/AIDS

– Condom (Male and Female) demonstrations and distribution

– Advocacy on HIV prevention.

  • Medical Missions/Outreaches

General health sensitization, medical consultations and treatments, referrals/follow up, free drugs, free eye checks and glasses, vitamin A supplementation and deworming (chewable albendazole) for school children, provision of Insecticide Treated Nets, referrals and medical procedures particularly for cases requiring surgery are also part of activities embarked upon by Dako Foundation in recent times. These activities have reached well over 10,000 rural dwellers in Lagos, Edo and Imo states.

In the process, there was a record of 90 dewormed children: 90 free eye glasses; 273 general treatments; 38 distributed water treatment units; 2 distributed wheel chairs and a clutch.

  • Post Flood Disaster Intervention for Victims of Flood

The aim of this outreach which reached over 5,132 people was to alleviate the pains inflicted on flood-ravaged areas of Anegbette, Osomegbe and EkperiUdaba, Etsako Central Local Government Area of Edo State, Nigeria.

Impacts: Distributed antifungal drugs; Distributed easy to use water sanitizing units with storage; Distributed food items;Distributed clothes to community dwellers; Distributed lifesaving prenatal and post-natal multivitamin supplements to pregnant and lactating women; Vitamin A supplementation for children; Medical consultation, prescription and treatment of local prevailing diseases.

  • Free Medical Surgery

During a medical mission in Edo State, Nigeria in 2016, DFRHCE came across little Amira aged 18 months who was born with brain tumor. For four years now, Amira has been under direct sponsorship by DFRHCE with free medical care at Dako Medical Centre, Lagos, Nigeria. So far, two surgeries have been done on Amira. The first surgery was conducted in the Emirates with the aim of removing the brain tumor followed by a second surgery carried out in Nigeria to repair Cleft palate and Cleft lip.

  • Water Project

An estimated 13,000 people were reached at the construction of a 40 feet high scaffolding to carry 10,000 liters of water reservoir with underground water extension pipes and taps in two communities(Iyerekhu, South –Ibie) Edo State, Nigeria.

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