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Nonprofit Operational Manual

The Nonprofit Operational Manual is designed to assist Nigerian nonprofits to strengthen their operational and technical capacity in delivering their vision and mission. The manual aims to help nonprofits adopt best organisation practices, clarify requirements, regulations and compliance issues relating to managing a nonprofit.

 

It is designed as both a capacity-building tool and reference material for successfully running a nonprofit organisation and as a guide for understanding and complying with regulatory frameworks guiding the operation of nonprofits in Nigeria. Through this manual as well as training, skills-building activities and information exchanges, NNNGO hopes to enhance the performance and capacity of organisations to deliver effective services to their beneficiaries and critical stakeholders.

 

Click here to download http://bit.ly/2EccVcM

Profiling Feet of Grace Foundation

Profiling Feet of Grace Foundation

For many years now, they have been demonstrating the power of positive attitude and by all means rocketing towards their goals since its inception in November 2014.

Since 2014, The Feet of Grace Foundation has been enriching lives by raising funds to provide both upper and lower extremity prosthesis and wheelchairs to amputees; children under 18 years of age, young ladies and women alike. The Foundation has also been facilitating educational scholarship for needy amputee children while supporting catalytic activities to alleviate poverty for women amputees.

By the end of 2019, 41 amputees would have benefited from the support provided by the Foundation. This support includes 42 prosthetic limbs (3 more to be delivered by the end of the month), and two wheelchairs (including one motorized for a double amputee). Three female amputees received seed funds to reestablish their small scale businesses. Six amputees are currently benefiting from educational scholarship with support from partner-organizations.

The Feet Of Grace Foundation also supports replacement of the prosthetic limbs for the children as they grow, and repairs/maintenance of all limbs provided as they wear out from daily use.

Well-done Dr Irene Olumese and your entire team.

#MotivationalMonday #StillStanding #LeaveNoOneBehind #Agenda2030 #GlobalGoals

Profiling The Irede Foundation (TIF) on International Day of Persons with Disability 2019.

Profiling The Irede Foundation (TIF) on International Day of Persons with Disability 2019.

Amputation surgery is an orthopedic surgical procedure carried out as the last resort, when limb salvage is not feasible. It is usually associated with social, emotional and psychological disturbances to patients and their families.

The incidence of amputation in populations have a base figure of 1-2 amputees per 1000 people for all causes combined. Some causes include: trauma (34%); malignant tumours (14.5%); diabetics (12.3%); infections (5.1%); peripheral artery disease (2.1%); and burns (2.1%).

Limb loss is much more common than many people realize, and its numbers, growing by the day. It is sad to know that statistics on the numbers of amputees especially in the developing world are staggering. Globally, there are more than 1 million annual limb amputations -— one every 30 seconds.

The estimated prevalence of extremity amputation in Nigeria is 1.6 per 100,000. Reports have revealed that the number is expected to double by 2050, which will by the way be faster than population growth. Meanwhile, limb loss isn’t just costly in the financial sense; it is expensive psychologically too.  According to research, approximately 30% of people with limb loss suffer from depression, anxiety, or both. While the demands on prosthesis in third world countries are often more difficult to meet than in developed countries, one way many organisations have lent their hands(giving their widow’s mite) is in the number of artificial limbs that they have been able to deliver particularly to the less privileged in the society.

As a provider of care and prosthesis for those suffering from limb loss, The Irede Foundation understands the peculiarity of this situation and in their own little way have ensured that if not all,  at least,  some are not left behind even in their bid to making children walk,  run and play again.

In this light,  The Irede Foundation focuses on working with child amputees to give them hope and help them live a fulfilled life. The foundation is able to achieve this feat by educating the general public, while also encouraging caregivers and empowering indigent children between ages 0-18 with artificial limbs.

Activities Include:

Limb Empowerment Programme: This program sorts for child amputees whether through congenital limb loss or through trauma, providing them with prosthetic limbs from first contact to age 18. With the goal to extend their voices globally, TIF organizes an annual 2km advocacy walk tagged “Out on a Limb”. The 2019 Walk was themed “ Ensuring Inclusiveness” for children and persons living with a disability. The Walk happens simultaneously across Nigeria.

For TIF, year 2019 has been full of eventful and worthy activities and achievements. TIF 2019 Achievements include:

* Limb Empowerment Programme: The Irede Foundation has been able to empower 21 child amputees with artificial limbs in the year 2019. Cumulatively, TIF has thus far empowered 99 child amputees with 136 limbs across 17  states in the 6 geo-political zones of the country.

* Out On A Limb: Recorded successful walks across 17 states in Nigeria and 7 global locations and recorded over 1,000 people in attendance with an indirect reach of 10,000.

*Media Feature:  Few months ago,  The Irede Foundation got featured on the top two Global Media Houses: CNN and BBC

In the bid to tell the world the story of Irede,  The CNN Changemaker captured the activities of the Foundation through the eyes and voice of the Executive Director as well as the full coverage  of Prosthetic Production (http://bit.ly/IREDECNN)

The BBC African Voices was also able to focus their lenses on people who have become  beneficiaries of the Foundation. http://bit.ly/IREDEBBC

The Irede Foundation is not about ready to relent in their service to humanity, TIF wants communities to be on the lookout and refer that child amputee who is in dire need of a prosthesis to The Irede Foundation, for at the Foundation, they  believe goodness has come to every amputee child that steps into their Foundation.

 

Profiling Sparkle Foundation on World Toilet Day

Profiling Sparkle Foundation on World Toilet Day

Some go to streams, some visit the bushes. Meanwhile in the process of doing this serious business, some, sadly have been bitten by reptiles.

One major outcome of the lack of sanitation facilities is open defecation, which according to some experts results in waterborne diseases outbreak such as dysentery and cholera particularly amongst children.

According to Nigeria Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Reports, the country’s sanitation sector is in near epileptic condition. It is with this aim to achieving SDG 6 for cleaner environments together with building some self-reliance, socio-economic development and improved physical wellbeing with great hope for a brighter future, Sparkle Foundation for orphans and the less privileged sees to the provision of health and educational support to the poor particularly in rural communities.

Health-concerned foundation that they are known for, Sparkle also encourages family planning for an effective birth control in several communities. Still on family planning, the Foundation partnered with NURHI (Nigerian Urban Reproductive Health Initiative) in other to create awareness on Family planning through sensitization. Sparkle Foundation was able to register 217 women for preferred methods; ranging from MICROGYNON, DEPO INJECTION, NORISTERAT INJECTION, IMPLANON and JADELLE. For the effectiveness of this sensitization, Sparkle ensured to distribute about 1,068 male and female condoms.

Sparkle has also successfully carried out various health awareness programs for children and youths; from drug abuse to mental health to basic hygiene.

At Sparkle Foundation, they believe every child through improved nutritional status and reduced physical ailments can achieve his/her potentials which can help create a viable sound future.

OTHER ACHIEVEMENTS INCLUDE:

  • Supported visual abilities of children by providing 150 children with eye drops and prescribed reading glasses to 21 children.
  • Renovation of 16 toilets for pupils and 2 Teachers’ toilets which has finally put an end to open defecation at Makoko Primary School in Lagos State.
  • Supported 2,200 families of children with food items through our Christmas Give Away, as part of our support to end hunger and malnutrition.

Committing to Realizing Positive Sustainable Change – November Newsletters 2019

Committing to Realizing Positive Sustainable Change – Istanbul Principle XIII

Over the years, Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) have embarked on programs/projects that assist communities to become empowered and ultimately attain sustainable development. In the bid to implement various sustainable development-related projects, CSOs are often encouraged to work in collaboration with beneficiaries by involving them at the various stages of the project implementation through proper consultation, information-sharing, and partnerships.

As agents of development, CSOs serve as service delivery partners and therefore act as the link between the public and private sectors as well as stand in a position to more holistically identify and address developmental gaps that have been otherwise left behind by the other two sectors. Very importantly, they serve as a political watchdog and ensure equitable governance through monitoring and reporting progress at local levels.

The eighth Istanbul principle of development effectiveness – “CSOs are effective as development actors when they collaborate to realize sustainable outcomes and impacts of their development actions, focusing on results and conditions for lasting change for people, with special emphasis on poor and marginalized populations, ensuring an enduring legacy for present and future generations” implies that; for effectiveness, self-reliance, and sustainability on project impacts, CSOs should embark on capacity building projects to develop the knowledge and skill of the community to mobilize resources.

CSOs programs should be aimed at improving the economic well-being of communities by job creation and income generation which in the long run, will contribute to sustainable community development. Proper consultation and embarking on community-driven projects motivates local level participation in developmental projects to improve their quality of life and commit to realizing sustainable change.

Project sustainability should always be factored before embarking on project activities. The beneficiaries need to feel the impact of the project even after the project/donor fund is exhausted. Project effectiveness and maintenance can be actualized through proper stakeholder mobilization, collaboration and building larger and more active local constituencies for grass root support and ensuring no one is left behind.

This newsletter is supported by Forus. However, the ideas and opinions presented in this document do not necessarily represent those of Forus , NNNGO or any other organisations mentioned.

 

NNNGO Launches Project to Strengthen Regulatory Frameworks for Civil Society

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About the Project

The Nigeria Network of NGOs announces the launch of a project, funded by the European Union, titled, “Strengthening Regulatory Frameworks for a More Accountable and Transparent Civil Society in Nigeria”, that focuses on current regulatory realities within the Nigerian nonprofit sector with an aim to lead conversations and actions on how these regulations can be better implemented in a way that creates an enabling operational environment for Nigerian civil society organisations (CSOs).

Project Launch

A project launch themed “Understanding Nonprofit Regulatory Frameworks; Trends and Realities” was organised in Abuja on Monday, November 4, 2019.  Participants who comprised seventy-two (72) CSOs gave insights into how best to carve out and popularize a self-regulatory mechanism that is responsive to the needs of the sector and can be effectively implemented in line with global best practices. 

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The Nigerian third sector is gradually awakening to the need to work together with regulators especially with regards to compliance issues and generally improve transparency and accountability within the sector. We are confident that this project and our approach to its implementation will allow for mutual communication among civic actors, regulators, and policymakers and we can all collaborate to create an enabling regulatory environment for the sector.

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Oyebisi Oluseyi, Executive Director of the Nigeria Network of NGOs.

“We are excited about this project especially as it focuses on one of our strategic pillars as organisation protection of the operational environment of Nigerian Nonprofits. We also expect that by the end of the project, one of the outcomes, among others is that it will serve as a repository of knowledge on nonprofit regulations, and provide key insights on how to incorporate global best practices into our work and the civil society sector as a whole” added Oyebisi Oluseyi. Conversations revolved around issues of registration of Nigerian Nonprofits, regulations, legitimacy, accountability, and transparency for the third sector. Participants also discussed the development of a nonprofit Code of Conduct by the sector, for the sector and approved by the Government as a guide for the operations of the Nigerian NGOs. Suggestions were made as to how nonprofits can better engage in collaborations, employ public information systems, peer review, and self-assessment mechanisms to allow growth and sustainability of organisations, especially those at the grassroots. 

A newly designed page tagged “Strengthening Regulatory Frameworks” (SRF) which offers a comprehensive understanding of the project has been created on the Network’s website www.nnngo.org where easy access is guaranteed to essential information on corporate governance within the Nigerian civil society sector, nonprofit realities as well as general information about Nigerian nonprofits. The page will be updated on a regular basis with news, pictures, and videos of project events, activities, milestones, and updates.  

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The project is intended to include peer reviews, consultations with CSOs across the country to garner opinions on regulations that they consider ideal and enabling; engagements with regulatory authorities and the National Assembly with the aim of producing a solid self-regulatory frame for Nonprofit organisations operating in Nigeria.  

This publication is produced with funding from the European Union.

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World Food Day- Fixing the Food System in Nigeria

Held annually on 16th October, World Food Day is a day of action dedicated to tackling Global Hunger with global awareness on the near epileptic global agricultural system, thus calling the attention of all to know that zero hunger can indeed save the lives of more than 3.1 million children every year.

Every day, soils, freshwater and oceans rapidly lose value, while climate change is putting even more pressure on available resources, increasing risks associated with disasters such as droughts and floods

Research reveals there is enough food production to feed inhabitants of Planet Earth, yet, about 800 million suffer from hunger still. That is one in nine people.

Consequently, wiping out malnutrition is one great challenge that cries for change yet reports show that one in nine still go to bed on empty stomachs every night. Even so – one in three suffer from malnutrition.

Meanwhile, mal-nutrition is estimated at 2.7 million child death rate annually. The first 2 years of a child’s life are particularly important, as optimal nutrition during this period lowers morbidity and mortality, reduces the risk of chronic disease, and fosters better development. However, many infants and children do not receive optimal feeding. According to UNICEF only about 36% of infants aged 0–6 months worldwide were exclusively breastfed in 2007-2014.

It is sad to know that while malnutrition exists; overweight also poses threat to the growth and development of children. UNICEF, WHO and World Bank – 2016 estimates reveal that the number of overweight children in Africa increased by more than 50 percent between 2000 and 2015.

While the Planet continually needs food, the world also needs to know that Agriculture is the single largest employer of labor in the world, providing livelihoods for 40 per cent of today’s global population. The largest source of income for poor rural households.

 

FOOD INSECURITY

Humans need food. But the complexity of delivering sufficient food to world’s population shows why food security should be a top priority for all nations, whether developed or developing.

  1. Population Growth – This varies considerably across countries. Africa is expected to double its population from 1 to 2 billion by year 2050, hence the need for food chain
  2. Climate Change– Currently, about 40% of the world’s landmass is arid, and rising temperatures will turn yet more of it into desert. At current rates, the amount of food grown will feed only half of the population by 2050.
  3. Water Scarcity –This is another impending crisis: 28% of agriculture lies in water-stressed regions.
  4. Small Scale Farmers – In developed countries, less than 2% of people grow crops and breed animals for consumption. In developing countries, even fewer people are choosing farming as an occupation. Meanwhile, food prices are rising, arable land continues to be lost to urban sprawl.

In Sub-Saharan Africa, records reveal that the Continent remains the only region with the highest prevalence of hunger, with the rate increasing from 20.7% in 2014 to 23.2% in 2017. The number of undernourished people increased from 195 million in 2014 to 237 million in 2017

(UNICEF 2017) tells us Nigeria is the most populous nation in Africa with almost 186 million people in 2016. By 2050, Nigeria’s population is expected to grow to a staggering 440 million, which will make it the third most populous country in the world, after India and China (Population Reference Bureau 2013).

According to the World Bank (2017), Nigeria’s economy is the largest in Africa and is well-positioned to play a leading role in the global economy already. Despite strong economic growth over the last decade, hunger dwells in the country still.

Currently, Nigeria ranks 145th out of 157 countries in progress towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). It is quite unfortunate though to know that 37% of children under 5 years are stunted. While stunting prevalence has improved since 2008 (41 percent), the extent of acute malnutrition has worsened, from 14% in 2008 to 18% in 2013.  (National Population Commission and ICF International 2009 and 2014).

The causes of malnutrition and food insecurity in Nigeria remains: Poor infant and young child feeding practices, which contribute to high rates of illness and poor nutrition among children under 2 years; lack of access to healthcare, water, and sanitation; armed conflict, particularly in the north; irregular rainfall; high unemployment; and poverty – (Nigeria Federal Ministry of Health, Family Health Department 2014). Although food insecurity spreads throughout the country, with the impact of conflicts and other shocks which have resulted in food insecurity particularly in the North East zone; an estimated 3.1 million people in the states of Borno, Yobe, and Adamawa received emergency food assistance in the first half of 2017.

For sustainable food security, Nigeria launched its “Zero Hunger Initiative as outlined in the National Policy on Food and Nutrition and National Strategic Plan of Action for Nutrition ahead of the AGENDA 2030 deadline of UN’s Sustainable Development Goals. It is therefore imperative to ensure that the country and the world at large continue to take necessary measures to prevent and reduce hunger and under nutrition by creating sustainable agriculture. Addressing hunger and which requires improvements in the agricultural sector thus need all stakeholders to come together facilitating partnerships at all levels, and encouraging the exchange of knowledge for growth and development through healthy consumption

 

 

 

Profiling Food Basket International Foundation on World Food Day- FOOD FOR ALL  

Profiling Food Basket International Foundation on World Food Day- FOOD FOR ALL  

Without balanced diet, medications become ineffective and even dangerous to the sick. Without food, children cannot learn well in schools; without food, the labor force can never be productive and effective, and without food on the table, several tasks will definitely be left undone.

Agriculture in Nigeria is a branch of the Nigeria’s economy that provides employment to about 30% of the population as at 2010 and contributes to over 25 percent of its Gross Domestic Product. Prior to the Nigerian civil war, the country churned out agricultural produce that sustained its population, however, but after the discovery of crude oil, agriculture unfortunately transformed to a neglected statue.

With core values of compassion and love for humanity, Food Basket Foundation International (FBFI), the very first indigenous nutrition-focused foundation in Nigeria founded in 1989 with the singular mission of helping low income families, particularly the vulnerable. FBFI through the years has provided interventions and services with the aims of alleviating the effects of poverty, promoting nutritious practices geared towards food security, and providing means of developing secured sustainable livelihood to the hungry.

FBFI continues to work, at the grassroots, alleviating the effects of poverty on vulnerable populations in a sustainable way; providing nutrition, education and acting as a bridge between those who need the assistance and those who can make the requisite changes to the policies that will make nutrition, food security and sustainable agriculture achievable for healthy lifestyle.

FBFI, going all the way to mitigate the effects of poverty, malnutrition, poor health and disease conditions in Nigeria through innovations is also in total readiness to assist low income families within the sub-Saharan African region to obtain a sustainable livelihood system, which would reduce poverty, malnutrition, disease and infant mortality rate.

With a focused target audience who randomly fall in the range of women, children and youths, these groups are currently provided with small-scale farming at Community-Based Technology Transfer Centre (CTTC), with the sole purpose to gaining access to new and innovative technologies for increased production and provision of nutritional services.

FBFI has provided nutrition education services to several communities – including Aremo community in Ibadan. FBFI organizes feeding programmes in Kaduna, Jigawa, Katsina, Kebbi, Osun and Oyo States. The Foundation, at some point also facilitated the implementation of the Case Study on the Efficacy of Nutrition on Infants and Young Children.

Despite the numerous humanitarian projects, some other achievements include: Implementing Gender Informed Nutrition and Agriculture (GINA) project; the use of integrated agriculture and nutrition interventions to improve the nutritional situation of vulnerable groups, particularly children under age five; Accelerating Vitamin A supplementation (VAS) through Child Health Weeks in Ogun and Osun states in collaboration with Micronutritient Initiative (2006-2011); Developed HIV/AIDS and Nutrition training manual for agricultural extension workers in partnership with the Federal Ministry of Agriculture; Capacity building via Nutrition Education in Nutritional Care and Support for caretakers of OVCs and PLWHA in Plateau, Edo, Kaduna, Nassarawa, Kogi States and the Federal Capital Territory; Adaptation of curriculum modules focused on improving nutrition through home gardens for the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO); Community-Based and Participatory poverty reduction planning, programe.

The Food Basket Foundation International supports the international community towards achieving the global Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and has been able to successfully complete a large number of field studies and publications focused on nutrition, maternal-child health, agriculture, sustainable livelihoods and poverty reduction in Nigeria, facilitated training of street food vendors; provided water through deep wells and toilet facilities in several villages in the Akinyele local government area of Ibadan, Oyo State.

COMPLIANCE GUIDE ON PART F OF COMPANIES AND MATTER ACTS (CAMA)

Nonprofit governance has been in the spotlight in the last few years with increased interest in regulatory compliance. The Part F of the Companies and Allied Matters Act (CAMA) is the law guiding the formation and governance of nonprofits in Nigeria. This document is our attempt to provide a framework for improving nonprofit compliance with the Part F of CAMA. Our theory of change is centered on the assumption that good nonprofit governance serves as a strong foundation for an efficient nonprofit sector. In this document we have placed strong emphasis on how nonprofits can achieve each clause in the law, rationale for meeting them and key outcomes for the nonprofit sector.

Download a copy here  CAMA LAW A4 – Complete Part F

GirlForce: Unscripted and Unstoppable.

GirlForce: Unscripted and Unstoppable.

In spite of the numerous efforts by stakeholders to promote the girl-child education especially in Africa, Nigeria is still ranked among one of the countries with the highest number of girls with no access to formal education. In the instances when girls do get into school, a good number do not have the opportunity to complete primary education.

Increased efforts and initiatives of individuals and organisations advocating for the education of the girl child in any society transcends just personal development for the female gender; such investments ultimately position the society for positive transformation and change.

While poverty remains the most important factor for determining whether a girl can access education, studies consistently reinforce that girls who face multiple disadvantages such as low family income, living in remote or under-served locations or disability — are farthest behind in terms of access to and completion of education.

The Purple Girl Foundation (PGF), provides educational support, health coverage, as well as leadership and peer learning opportunities to under-served girls from indigent families to improve their prospects for the future. Borne out of a desire to provide opportunities for enhancing education for the girl-child, the foundation’s main function is; providing educational support to female children from indigent families at the primary, secondary and tertiary levels.

For future offerings, the foundation will focus on female children from indigent families in Lagos, Delta and Akwa-Ibom states. With this, PGF seeks to improve future prospects and opportunities for the girl-child through the following activities:

  • Full scholarships for young girls at the primary, secondary and tertiary levels with benefactors selected across public and low-cost schools for full academic sessions.
  • Provision of financial support to cater to feeding, stationery, examinations, uniforms and other miscellaneous expenses for the period of their education.
  • Provision of health coverage for all beneficiaries across primary, secondary and tertiary school levels.
  • Partner with training institutions to facilitate sessions on character development and peer learning for young girls.