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CE-FATF-ENG NEWSLETTER (DECEMBER) 2017

CE-FATF-ENG NEWSLETTER (DECEMBER) 2017

OUTCOME OF THE NFIU WORKSHOP II

 

AML/CFT regime of Nigeria – legal and regulatory framework

 

In 2010, Nigeria made a high level commitment to work with FATF and GIABA. This decision greatly influenced the Anti-Money Laundering /Combating the Financing of Terrorism (AML/CFT) regime in the country, ensuring that it took a positive turn. The commitment was basically to address its strategies and efficiencies in AML/CFT regime thereby resulting in a lot of progressive work for that system in the country.

 

The AML/CFT laws promulgated include: the terrorism prevention act of 2011 (as amended), the Money Laundering Prohibition Act 2011 (as amended), the CBN Regulation which is currently being adjusted to include punitive measures. Inclusive are regulations made by the Special Control Unit on Money Laundering through the Federal Ministry of Trade and Investment.

 

These laws are important in order to effectively and adequately combat the rapidly growing trend of money Laundering and Terrorism Financing, in order to forestall a situation where the law becomes overtaken by criminal activities. It is pertinent to state that the growth of criminal activities and discoveries is faster and so it is contingent upon all stakeholders to uphold the law and ensure that it grows to match force with them.

 

Currently, the AML/CFT regime is robust, however, there is the need to promulgate bills that will target real issues facing the sector; the bill on ‘the mutual assistance in criminal matters’ is one of such. This bill will help to address cross border crimes. It is also important to promulgate a bill that will formally establish the NFIU as a requirement from the Egmont group as well as fine tune existing laws for them to work effectively.

 

 

END

 

Published with the support of OSIWA

 

This newsletter is published as part of the civic engagement on the Financial Action Task Force evaluation on Nigeria project supported by OSIWA. All opinions expressed are that of the authors and does not reflect that of OSIWA or NNNGO or any other organization(s) mentioned.

 

About CE-FATF-ENG: CE-FATF-ENG stands for civic engagement on the Financial Action Task Force evaluation on Nigeria.

 

This newsletter is part of the CE-FATF_ENG project implemented by NNNGO with the support of Open Society Initiative for West Africa (OSIWA).

 

Further information: E: nnnngo@nnngo.org | T: 0802 857 3849 | F: @nnngo T: @nnngo

CE-FATF-ENG NEWSLETTER (NOVEMBER) 2017

CE-FATF-ENG NEWSLETTER (NOVEMBER) 2017

OUTCOME OF THE NFIU WORKSHOP

 

The importance of the private sector involvement in the 2nd round of the mutual evaluation exercise:

 

The private sector is the part of the national economy that is not under direct state control and it comprises organizations whose primary aim is profit-making and income generation; these organizations which carry out legal monetary transactions are also vulnerable to risks of money laundering. At the workshop, speakers noted that private sector organizations need to begin to carry out their functions in line with the law as well as assist the authorities to sanitize the sector of unscrupulous individuals who violate the rules. This can be achieved by enhancing the process of transparency in what we are doing and also ensure we help in the fight against money laundering and terrorism financing.

 

The private sector is the nucleus of every system; their involvement in the mutual evaluation process is important as most of the information required and provided is necessary to ensure technical as well as full compliance of all stakeholders.

 

Appendix 2 of the procedures laid down by FATF on the 4th mutual evaluation specifically mentioned that the financial sector which is the private sector, alongside the Designated Non Financial Institution form an integral part of the entire mutual evaluation process. Hence, the private sector and other non-government regulatory agencies are required to be a part of every mutual evaluation exercise; they must always be contacted and consulted in everything that is done during the evaluation period. In fact, effectiveness of the systems is tested more particularly from that area. This enables the achievement of defined results.

 

In further integrating the private sector in the process of mutual evaluation, adequate knowledge of all the procedures including what is expected must be provided to these organizations and how they need to comply with regulations because, ignorance of the law is not an excuse. Hence, it is important that the Nigerian Financial Intelligence Unit ensures that all systems are firmly controlled and in perfect conditions in order to forestall the occurrence of system breech.

 

To completely eradicate criminality in the country, therefore, the collaboration and cooperation of stakeholders within and across different sectors are paramount. At the workshop, speakers noted the need for all sectors; public, private and non-profit, in the fight against money laundering and terrorism financing. Co-operation connotes the ability of each sector to organize itself properly in line with set rules and regulations in order to achieve the ultimate goal set out by FATF against ML/CFT. It enables agencies connect the dots as it is impossible for compliance to compete, it is therefore imperative that all concerned should individually and collectively ensure compliance is achieved.

 

END

 

Published with the support of OSIWA

 

This newsletter is published as part of the civic engagement on the Financial Action Task Force evaluation on Nigeria project supported by OSIWA. All opinions expressed are that of the authors and does not reflect that of OSIWA or NNNGO or any other organization(s) mentioned.

 

About CE-FATF-ENG: CE-FATF-ENG stands for civic engagement on the Financial Action Task Force evaluation on Nigeria.

 

This newsletter is part of the CE-FATF_ENG project implemented by NNNGO with the support of Open Society Initiative for West Africa (OSIWA).

 

Further information: E: nnnngo@nnngo.org | T: 0802 857 3849 | F: @nnngo T: @nnngo

CE-FATF-ENG NEWSLETTER (OCTOBER) 2017

CE-FATF-ENG NEWSLETTER (OCTOBER) 2017

FATF EVALUATION IN NIGERIA

 

The Financial Action Task Force was established in 1989 by the G-7 member countries. It was established in response to concerns on money laundering and recognition of the threat it posed to the international financial system.

 

The FATF is primarily charged with setting standards and promoting effective implementation of legal, regulatory and operational measures for combating money laundering, terrorist financing and other related threats to the integrity of the international financial system.

 

One of the responsibilities of this intergovernmental body is to conduct mutual evaluations of its members. Mutual evaluation conducted by FATF takes the shape of peer reviews where members from different countries assess other countries’ level of implementation and compliance to the FATF Recommendations and vice versa.

 

The relevance of a mutual evaluation report lies in its ability to provide an in-depth and unbiased analysis of a country regarding preventing criminal abuse of the financial system. It also ensures that focused recommendations are made to further strengthen the system. This is because the most important goal of mutual evaluations is to make improvements in national systems for combating money laundering and terrorist financing.

 

The scope of the evaluations will involve two inter-related components for technical compliance and effectiveness. The technical compliance component will assess whether the necessary laws, regulations or other required measures are in force and effect, and whether the supporting anti-money laundering (AML) / countering the financing of terrorism (CFT) institutional framework is in place. The expectation is that during this round of assessments countries should have addressed their shortcomings and achieve better technical compliance ratings than last time.

 

The effectiveness component will assess whether the AML/CFT systems are working, and the extent to which the country is achieving the defined set outcomes. Effectiveness will make assessments more challenging because judgments will need to be made on how various components of the AML/CFT regime interact. Reports will provide a basis upon which countries can address the issues that are most critical for them.

 

The purpose of implementing anti-money laundering and counter-terrorist financing (AML/CFT) measures is to protect the financial system from abuse. A country’s efforts in developing sound laws and regulations and implementing and enforcing them should focus on, the high-level objective of an effective AML/CFT framework which can only be achieved if the components of a country’s AML/CFT framework are operating well together and ensure proper sensitization at all levels. The extent to which a country implements the technical requirements of each of the FATF Recommendations remains important; they are after all the building blocks for an effective framework to protect the financial system.

 

As part of the procedure of becoming a member of the Financial Action Task Force, Nigeria is expected to host a high level delegation of the FATF secretariat on the 20th and 21st November, 2017. During the visit, the delegation is expected to interact with the key players on AML/CFT in the country.

 

Following the admission of Nigeria into the body, evaluations would begin; it then becomes important that the Nigerian government engages with the non-profit sector in order to allow for an effective evaluation of the country. Through various outreaches the government and non-profit organizations can work together in preparedness for the onsite visit and engender stronger systems.

 

It is however pertinent to note that, the mutual evaluation report is not the end of the process. It is essential that there is rigorous and long-term follow-up, to make sure countries do make changes, and also to provide the help, support, advice, and sometimes pressure; that will enable them make permanent changes to their national systems.

 

END

 

Published with the support of OSIWA

 

This newsletter is published as part of the civic engagement on the Financial Action Task Force evaluation on Nigeria project supported by OSIWA. All opinions expressed are that of the authors and does not reflect that of OSIWA or NNNGO or any other organization(s) mentioned.

 

About CE-FATF-ENG: CE-FATF-ENG stands for civic engagement on the Financial Action Task Force evaluation on Nigeria.

 

This newsletter is part of the CE-FATF_ENG project implemented by NNNGO with the support of Open Society Initiative for West Africa (OSIWA).

 

Further information: E: nnnngo@nnngo.org | T: 0802 857 3849 | F: @nnngo T: @nnngo

CE-FATF-ENG NEWSLETTER (SEPTEMBER) 2017

CE-FATF-ENG NEWSLETTER (SEPTEMBER) 2017

Financial Management: Record Keeping (Recommendation 11)

 

The clamour for transparency and accountability within the third sector as well as the need to ensure that not-for-profit organizations function efficiently are some of the factors which inform the need to discuss financial management.

 

Since not-for-profit organizations carry out financial transactions, it is important that practices which will aid corporate governance begin to be incorporated into the operations of not-for-profits in order for them to survive and develop. One key practice worthy of imbibing is record keeping.

 

Record keeping is described as the act of taking into account all earnings and spending within an organization. It is a financial management practice and also an effective way to minimize risk within the organization while ensuring that permanent official records of all activities exist.

 

The recording system of NGOs’ financial transactions allows monitoring of bank balances, status of funds receipts and expenditures, and a comparative statement of budget vs. actual expenditure on a regular basis.

 

Contracts and letters for money received, receipts and invoices for things bought should be recorded and kept for reference purposes. Copies of official identification documents like passports, identity cards, driving licences or similar documents, account files and business correspondence, including the results of any analysis undertaken (e.g. inquiries to establish the background and purpose of complex, unusual large transactions), for at least five years after the business relationship is ended, or after the date of the occasional transaction are some of the documents which need to be recorded.

These basic records prove that each and every transaction has taken place. They are the cornerstones of accountability. An organization must make sure that all these records are carefully filed and kept safe with details of each transaction written down in a cashbook. While effective record keeping improves an organization’s financial viability, it also makes it easier for donor agencies to trust them. Donor agencies find it easy to render immediate funding support to NGOs which have systematic policies in place for effective financial management.

Financial viability involves the managerial decisions on the generation, distribution and use of NGO’s financial resources with a goal to ensure access to capital at all time.

It involves keeping a record of all activities and transaction occurring within a NGO. Its objective is to ensure effective use of funds along the main areas of NGO activities and it encourages transparency.

 

According the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) recommendation 11, organizations and all registered NGOs are required to maintain a system for recording and submitting all types of transactions made by them for the purposes of implementing projects and running their organization. Also, they should be required to maintain, for at least five years, all necessary records on transactions, both domestic and international, to enable them to comply swiftly with information requests from the competent authorities.

Such records must be sufficient to permit reconstruction of individual transactions (including the amounts and types of currency involved, if any). This is to provide, if necessary, evidence for prosecution of criminal activity.    Organizations also should be required to keep all records obtained through Customer Due Diligence (CDD) measures.

END

Published with the support of OSIWA

This newsletter is published as part of the civic engagement on the Financial Action Task Force evaluation on Nigeria project supported by OSIWA. All opinions expressed are that of the authors and does not reflect that of OSIWA or NNNGO or any other organization(s) mentioned.

About CE-FATF-ENG: CE-FATF-ENG stands for civic engagement on the Financial Action Task Force evaluation on Nigeria.

This newsletter is part of the CE-FATF_ENG project implemented by NNNGO with the support of Open Society Initiative for West Africa (OSIWA).

Further information: E: nnnngo@nnngo.org | T: 0802 857 3849 | F: @nnngo T: @nnngo

CE-FATF-ENG NEWSLETTER (AUGUST) 2017

CE-FATF-ENG NEWSLETTER (AUGUST) 2017

NFIU’S SUSPENSION FROM EGMONT GROUP: IMPLICATIONS AND WAY FORWARD

 

Nigeria’s admission into the Egmont Group in 2007 was considered one of the biggest achievements of the Obasanjo administration.

 

The 156 countries which constitute membership of the Egmont Group rely on the group for assistance in investigations of financial crime, terrorism financing, and corruption. This is because all bank accounts and other assets of suspects are made available to the countries wherever they are located in the world. Member countries also benefit from interacting with one another by sharing intelligence relating to international finance and illicit flow.

 

Nigeria’s membership paved way for the removal of her banks from the international finance blacklist which had hitherto prevented the banks from engaging in correspondent banking with foreign institutions. It had also denied Nigerians access to foreign credit cards.

 

Since Nigeria’s admission into the Egmont group, agencies such as the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN), Nigerian Customs Service, Independent Corrupt Practices and Related Offences Commission (ICPC), the EFCC, Nigeria Immigration Service (NIS), Federal Inland Revenue Service (FIRS), and the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) have benefitted immensely from the activities of the group.

 

On July 5th, 2017, however, the NFIU was reportedly suspended from the Egmont Group of Financial Intelligence Units. This was consequent of Nigeria’s failure to provide a legal framework that would grant operational autonomy to the NFIU. The development had been objected to by the Egmont group on the grounds that it contravened international standards set by the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) which stresses the need for an independent body. Coupled with this were accusations of divulgence of confidential information to the media which were leveled against Nigeria; a departure from global best practices which the country signed up for.

 

One of the immediate effects of Nigeria’s suspension from the group is that the Egmont Secure Web, (ESW) is currently shutdown against Nigeria. The implication of this is that Nigeria can no longer exchange sensitive information with other member countries in order to carry out her investigative and regulatory responsibilities as they affect local and international investigations. Another implication is the blacklisting of Nigeria in international finance which would affect the issuance of MasterCard and Visa credit and debit cards.

 

Nigeria’s inaction towards rectifying the status quo could not only hamper the country’s ability to recover stolen funds abroad but could ultimately lead to expulsion from the group.

 

If expelled, the United Nations Convention Against Corruption (UNCAC) Implementation Reviewing Group will be served notice against Nigeria; countries such as USA, Germany and Switzerland and more would then alert their financial institutions to exercise caution in transacting with Nigeria and its citizens. This spells doom for businesses and ultimately the Nigerian economy.

 

Activities of civil society organizations would be greatly affected if the situation is not rectified. Many nonprofits who get sponsorship from international organizations would encounter difficulties in transacting with these agencies and accessing funds in financial institutions located outside the country while others would be unable to get sponsorship from new donors.

 

To reverse the situation, the Nigerian Senate has resolved to pass a law creating a substantive and autonomous NFIU, independent of the anti-graft agency- EFCC. This will ensure that the Unit is legally, financially and operationally autonomous with powers for employment, reward, training, promotion and discipline of its workforce. The Nigerian government should include in its supplementary budget, separate funds for the NFIU.

 

The Senate has also urged the three Line Ministries of Justice, Finance and Interior to do all within their powers to ensure that Nigeria’s suspension is immediately reversed and ensure that all conditions specified by the Egmont Group are met to re-admit and improve Nigeria’s standing within the group while increasing their levels of cooperation and coordination.

 

END

 

Published with the support of OSIWA

 

This newsletter is published as part of the civic engagement on the Financial Action Task Force evaluation on Nigeria project supported by OSIWA. All opinions expressed are that of the authors and does not reflect that of OSIWA or NNNGO or any other organization(s) mentioned.

 

About CE-FATF-ENG: CE-FATF-ENG stands for civic engagement on the Financial Action Task Force evaluation on Nigeria.

 

This newsletter is part of the CE-FATF_ENG project implemented by NNNGO with the support of Open Society Initiative for West Africa (OSIWA).

 

Further information: E: nnnngo@nnngo.org | T: 0802 857 3849 | F: @nnngo T: @nnngo

CE-FATF-ENG NEWSLETTER (JULY) 2017

CE-FATF-ENG NEWSLETTER (JULY) 2017

Nigerian Financial Intelligence Unit

 

In order to chart way forward on how best to lessen the risk of terrorist abuse among Civil Society Organizations, the Nigeria Network of Non-Governmental Organizations sought to establish a strong working relationship with the Nigerian Financial Intelligence Unit with a view to strengthening CSOs in Nigeria.

 

It was for this reason that a team comprising a member of the Board of Trustees, the Executive Director, the Administrative and Membership Officer as well as relevant staff of the NNNGO paid a courtesy call to the NFIU head office located in Abuja.

 

The visit was made on 17th May, 2017 and major points of discourse were the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) and its implication on Nigerian civil society, to get information on the upcoming FATF evaluation of Nigeria and how to engage CSOs in Risk Assessment.

 

The NFIU team noted that while Nigeria is only a member of FATF by its association to GIABA, the NFIU is committed to working with Nigerian CSOs to allow for convenient working space.

 

The need to intensify sensitization of Nigerian CSOs on FATF activities was also acknowledged while the team also noted that there are on-going deliberations regarding carrying out civil society evaluation, embarking on the National Risk Assessment as well as taking NPOs out of Designated Non Financial Institutions (DNFI).

 

The NFIU is the Nigerian arm of the global Financial Intelligence Units domiciled within the EFCC as an autonomous unit and operating in the African Region. It was established in response to the blacklisting of Nigeria in the 1990’s by the Financial Action Task Force.

 

Nigeria was blacklisted and deemed uncooperative due to the fact that adequate regulatory structures failed to be put in place by government in order to combat financial fraud.

 

In response to the FATF recommendation and fulfillment of the UNCAC requirements, therefore, the NFIU was formally established in 2004 and became fully operational in 2005. The Unit has since establishment sought to develop standards and procedures for the receipt,analysis and dissemination of financial intelligence to law enforcement agencies, perform onsite and off-site examination of financial institutions as well as enhance compliance with the legal and regulatory regimes on Anti-Money Laundering and Combating the Financing of Terrorism (AML/CFT).

 

The NFIU largely draws its powers from the Money Laundering (Prohibition) Act 2011 as amended in 2012 and the Economic & Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) establishment Act, 2004.

 

The core mandate of the NFIU, as required by international standard is to serve as the “national center for the receipt and analysis of: (a) suspicious transaction reports; and (b) other information relevant to money laundering, associated predicate offences and terrorist financing, and for the dissemination of the results of the analysis to law enforcement and anti-corruption agencies.

END

Published with the support of OSIWA

This newsletter is published as part of the civic engagement on the Financial Action Task Force evaluation on Nigeria project supported by OSIWA. All opinions expressed are that of the authors and does not reflect that of OSIWA or NNNGO or any other organization(s) mentioned.

About CE-FATF-ENG: CE-FATF-ENG stands for civic engagement on the Financial Action Task Force evaluation on Nigeria.

This newsletter is part of the CE-FATF_ENG project implemented by NNNGO with the support of Open Society Initiative for West Africa (OSIWA).

Further information: E: nnnngo@nnngo.org | T: 0802 857 3849 | F: @nnngo T: @nnngo

CE-FATF-ENG NEWSLETTER (June) 2017

CE-FATF-ENG NEWSLETTER (June) 2017

Outcome of Engagement Meeting with SCUML:

 

An engagement meeting initiated by the Nigeria Network of NGOs (NNNGO) aimed at fostering a strong working relationship as well as collaboration with one of the regulatory bodies in the country was held on 16th of May, 2017.

 

A team comprising a member of the Board of Trustees, the Executive Director, the Administrative and Membership Officer as well as relevant staff of the Network paid a courtesy call to the head office of the Special Control Unit against Money Laundering (SCUML) located in the capital city, Abuja.

 

In continuance of its work on sensitizing Nigerian Civil Society Organizations (CSO) on the Financial Action Task Force (FATF) Recommendation 8 coupled with the need to support the struggle of CSOs regarding how best to enhance the regulatory environment in which they work, NNNGO sought audience with SCUML to highlight issues relating to the challenges of registering with SCUML, sensitization on Money Laundering (ML) and Terrorist Financing (TF), Financial Accountability, National Risk Assessment (NRA) and noncompliance to the 2011 Anti-Money Laundering Laws (AML).

 

The engagement meeting with SCUML was therefore seen as an opportunity to chart a way forward on how best to sort out these issues.

 

The importance of NNNGO’s work and its impact were acknowledged especially in number of its members who have registered with SCUML.

 

The SCUML team therefore gave assurance of its commitment to deepen collaboration with the Network especially in organizing workshops focused on creating awareness about financial crimes in the sector. This was centered on the urgent need for adequate and unrelenting sensitization in the area of donor monitoring so as to decrease the level of vulnerability of CSOs in Nigeria to ML and TF.

 

The National Risk Assessment (NRA) conducted in 2016 was mentioned as a background to issues of noncompliance within the third sector; Faith-based organizations were particularly identified as non-compliant while SCUML gave assurance of the organization’s willingness in improving compliance within the sector.

 

Addressing the issue of difficulty in registering on SCUML website, guidelines were provided to the delegation on how best to access the portal in order to allow for a smooth registration experience. To do this, organizations must give a brief profile of their institutions and ensure that all scanned documents to be uploaded are compressed to 2MB.

 

An e-mail would then be sent immediately, acknowledging the receipt of the application. Following a careful review, a certificate of registration is made ready for collection within ten working days and issued at the location indicated by the organization undergoing registration.

 

The importance of registering with SCUML was further reiterated at the meeting as the certificate is needed to open organizational bank account by nonprofits.

 

END

 

Published with the support of OSIWA

 

This newsletter is published as part of the civic engagement on the Financial Action Task Force evaluation on Nigeria project supported by OSIWA. All opinions expressed are that of the authors and does not reflect that of OSIWA or NNNGO or any other organization(s) mentioned.

 

About CE-FATF-ENG: CE-FATF-ENG stands for civic engagement on the Financial Action Task Force evaluation on Nigeria.

This newsletter is part of the CE-FATF_ENG project implemented by NNNGO with the support of Open Society Initiative for West Africa (OSIWA).

 

Further information: E: nnnngo@nnngo.org | T: 0802 857 3849 | F: @nnngo T: @nnngo

CE-FATF-ENG NEWSLETTER (May) 2017

CE-FATF-ENG NEWSLETTER (May) 2017

Laws Guiding the Activities of Non – Profits in Nigeria.

 

An identified challenge within the Nigerian third sector space is that most Non Profit Organizations (NPOs) are not widely familiar with the laws that govern the sector including government institutions in charge of these laws. Being conscious of these laws and governing bodies will enable NPOs know how and where to address various issues, ranging from registration, auditing, filing annual returns, and tax payment if necessary.

 

It is important to note that the legal, regulatory, and policy environments in which Nigerian NPOs operate shape their ability to obtain legal status, access resources, deliver services, and engage in advocacy.

 

The five governmental bodies which have the statutory authority to supervise Nigerian NPOs include the CAC, FIRS, SCUML, NPC and FRC. The main legal instrument governing NPOs in Nigeria; the Companies and Allied Matters Act (CAMA) establishes the Corporate Affairs Commission (CAC), which is charged with responsibility of registering and regulating NPOs. Part C of CAMA specifically addresses the registration of NPOs as associations with incorporated trustees.

 

Also governing NPOs is the Companies Income Tax Amendment Act (CITA) which is overseen by the Federal Inland Revenue Service. CITA is a direct tax, levied on the profits of companies in Nigeria.

 

NPOs pay VAT on goods and services consumed, except those purchased exclusively for donor funded humanitarian projects or activities, which are zero rated under the Value-Added Tax Act, as amended. Thus while NPOs are exempted from paying taxes on income derived from their primary registered activities, they are liable for income tax on their commercial activities, such as a business or trade.

 

The Value-Added Tax (amendment) Act provides a framework for the imposition of Value-Added Tax on certain goods and services and provides for the administration of the tax and related matters. The Taxes and Levies (approved list for collection) degree establish a list of taxes, levies, and fees collectible by the various tiers of government in Nigeria.

 

The Personal Income Tax Act establishes a legal framework for income tax on individuals, communities, families, and executors and trustees, and provides for assessment, collection, and administration of the tax.

 

The Money Laundering Prohibition Act as amended enhances the scope of money laundering offences and customer due-diligence measures. This act is overseen by Special Control Unit against Money Laundering (SCUML).

 

The National Planning Commission seeks to determine and advise on policies that will best promote national unity and sustain the Nigerian nation.

 

The Financial Reporting Council is the body responsible for the enforcement of the Code of Corporate Governance within the third sector. The code is a document defining the minimum standard of conduct expected of public companies with listed securities; it includes principles and practices of corporate governance applicable in Nigeria and all NPOs are expected to either comply or justify non-compliance.

 

END

 

Published with the support of OSIWA

 

This newsletter is published as part of the civic engagement on the Financial Action Task Force evaluation on Nigeria project supported by OSIWA. All opinions expressed are that of the authors and does not reflect that of OSIWA or NNNGO or any other organization(s) mentioned.

 

About CE-FATF-ENG: CE-FATF-ENG stands for civic engagement on the Financial Action Task Force evaluation on Nigeria.

This newsletter is part of the CE-FATF_ENG project implemented by NNNGO with the support of Open Society Initiative for West Africa (OSIWA).

 

Further information: E: nnnngo@nnngo.org | T: 0802 857 3849 | F: @nnngo T: @nnngo

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