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Nigerian Optometric Association - THE DARK CLOUD

Nigerian Optometric Association – THE DARK CLOUD

On a stormy evening when the lights go out and eyes could not adjust to the darkness, one learns what it means to live with a partially distorted vision. Following sounds and relying on touching of objects, one might just for the very first time have firsthand experience with utter darkness.

 

285 million people are estimated to be visually impaired worldwide, 39 million are blind and 246 have low vision. About 90% of the world’s visually impaired live in low-income settings. 82% of people living with blindness are aged 50 and above. Globally, uncorrected refractive errors are the main cause of moderate and severe visual impairment while cataracts remain the leading cause of blindness in middle and low-income countries. In the UK, there are almost 2 million people living with sight loss. Of these, around 360,000 are registered as blind or partially sighted.

 

There is an estimated 9 million blind in sub-Saharan Africa and a further 27 million people are visually impaired. According to estimation, one percent of all Africans are blind.

 

According to the Federal Ministry of Health, 42 out of every 1,000 Nigerians aged 40 and above are visually impaired and as for the

 

On a stormy evening when the lights go out and eyes could not adjust to the darkness, one learns what it means to live with a partially distorted vision. Following sounds and relying on touching of objects, one might just for the very first time have firsthand experience with utter darkness.

 

285 million people are estimated to be visually impaired worldwide, 39 million are blind and 246 have low vision. About 90% of the world’s visually impaired live in low-income settings. 82% of people living with blindness are aged 50 and above. Globally, uncorrected refractive errors are the main cause of moderate and severe visual impairment while cataracts remain the leading cause of blindness in middle and low-income countries. In the UK, there are almost 2 million people living with sight loss. Of these, around 360,000 are registered as blind or partially sighted.

 

There is an estimated 9 million blind in sub-Saharan Africa and a further 27 million people are visually impaired. According to estimation, one percent of all Africans are blind.

 

According to the Federal Ministry of Health, 42 out of every 1,000 Nigerians aged 40 and above are visually impaired and as for the Nigerian Optometric Association (NOA) Lagos branch, more than one million Nigerians are completely blind while three million are visually impaired

 

There is an old Hebrew proverb that believes the blind were the most trustworthy sources for quotations. It has also been reported that the blind have the best memory.

 

Information on a visual impairment that cannot be treated can be difficult to come to terms with. Some people go through a process similar to bereavement, where they experience a range of emotions including shock, anger, and denial before eventually coming to accept the condition.

 

Visual impairment does not equate to the complete loss of vision. In fact, according to the World Health Organization (WHO), 15.88% of people who are visually impaired, face total darkness or are blind. The remaining 84.12% have a partial or residual vision, like color perception, light perception, movement or even form perception. They may be able to see in blurs or varying degrees of distortion, with literal blind spots in some areas.

 

The visually impaired possess several traits, some of them include; constant communication using normal language, responsiveness to the environment as any human, more nightmares than sighted people, color comprehension in unique ways, open curiosity about life and not all of them actually use a cane to navigate to learn more about their world.

 

Hope restored and joy rekindled for the visually impaired, Society for The Welfare of The Blind (SWBN) in 1990 resolved to care and addressing the developmental needs of the blinds in Nigeria, a need hinged on a fact that the blinds have been marginalized for far too long.

 

SWBN in 2012 through her visions, provided opportunities to the visually impaired, ensuring that inadequacies and shortcomings which for several years made their lives uncomfortable, meaningless and purposeless were reduced to the barest minimum.

 

SWBN has been able to advance their total wellbeing by providing reading materials in Braille which would help them live independently. In addition to the impacts are; successful production of textbooks in Braille to Federal Government College, Ijaniki, Lagos; Queen’s College, Sabo Yaba and St Gregory’s College. Construction of Zebra- crossing signpost at Cappa bus stop Agege Motto road, Mushin Lagos to minimize the frequent occurrence of blind people being knocked down.

 

The Executive Director, Tade Eniloa Ladipo recounted that on November 14th, 2012 SWBN visited Iyewa College and presented a Braille machine donated by Exxon Mobil to the visually impaired students of the school.

 

She concluded that the provision of grants to aid educational and vocational aspirations of some blind students in her community together with the construction of the blind library will go a long way in lighting up the dark tunnels of the visually impaired in her community.

 

(NOA) Lagos branch, more than one million Nigerians are completely blind while three million are visually impaired

 

There is an old Hebrew proverb that believes the blind were the most trustworthy sources for quotations. It has also been reported that the blind have the best memory.

 

Information on a visual impairment that cannot be treated can be difficult to come to terms with. Some people go through a process similar to bereavement, where they experience a range of emotions including shock, anger, and denial before eventually coming to accept the condition.

 

Visual impairment does not equate to the complete loss of vision. In fact, according to the World Health Organization (WHO), 15.88% of people who are visually impaired, face total darkness or are blind. The remaining 84.12% have a partial or residual vision, like color perception, light perception, movement or even form perception. They may be able to see in blurs or varying degrees of distortion, with literal blind spots in some areas.

 

The visually impaired possess several traits, some of them include; constant communication using normal language, responsiveness to the environment as any human, more nightmares than sighted people, color comprehension in unique ways, open curiosity about life and not all of them actually use a cane to navigate to learn more about their world.

 

Hope restored and joy rekindled for the visually impaired, Society for The Welfare of The Blind (SWBN) in 1990 resolved to care and addressing the developmental needs of the blinds in Nigeria, a need hinged on a fact that the blinds have been marginalized for far too long.

 

SWBN in 2012 through her visions, provided opportunities to the visually impaired, ensuring that inadequacies and shortcomings which for several years made their lives uncomfortable, meaningless and purposeless were reduced to the barest minimum.

 

SWBN has been able to advance their total wellbeing by providing reading materials in Braille which would help them live independently. In addition to the impacts are; successful production of textbooks in Braille to Federal Government College, Ijaniki, Lagos; Queen’s College, Sabo Yaba and St Gregory’s College. Construction of Zebra- crossing signpost at Cappa bus stop Agege Motto road, Mushin Lagos to minimize the frequent occurrence of blind people being knocked down.

 

The Executive Director, Tade Eniloa Ladipo recounted that on November 14th, 2012 SWBN visited Iyewa College and presented a Braille machine donated by Exxon Mobil to the visually impaired students of the school.

 

She concluded that the provision of grants to aid educational and vocational aspirations of some blind students in her community together with the construction of the blind library will go a long way in lighting up the dark tunnels of the visually impaired in her community.

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