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Knowledge-sharing and Commitment to Mutual Learning within the Nonprofit Space – October 2019

Knowledge-sharing and Commitment to Mutual Learning within the Nonprofit Space – Istanbul Principle VII

Nonprofits play an increasingly important role in both local and international development. With a dynamic environment fraught with uncertainties, no single nonprofit is a repository of all knowledge, hence the need for continuous learning.

To address developmental challenges, the activities of nonprofits are increasingly reliant on high-quality information and knowledge shared- necessary for organisational effectiveness and sustainability through collaborative practices.

Knowledge is the intellectual capital of any organisation and it must be said that while many nonprofits lack the critical processes and knowledge needed to help them develop, evaluate, document, and share successful programs, there is quite a number who have these capacities. Being in the space to create and share knowledge with one another while mutually committing to continuous and sustained learning is key to long term organisational effectiveness for individual organisations and the nonprofit sector at large. Part of the benefits for Civil society organisations (CSOs) involved in this kind of arrangement is the renewed capacity to execute key activities within a given time-frame.

Knowledge-sharing engenders growth within the sector especially when smaller nonprofits are privy to experiences of bigger organisations who faced down challenges in the past, learned from them and eventually delivered on their goals. Thus, various actors while working together would produce knowledge and share essential information that promotes grassroots development.

The 7th Istanbul principle of development effectiveness states – “CSOs are effective as development actors when they enhance the ways they learn from their experience, from other CSOs and development actors, integrating evidence from development practice and results, including the knowledge and wisdom of local and indigenous communities, strengthening innovation and their vision for the future they would like to see”.

CSOs need to commit to mutual learning and knowledge sharing because developmental issues can only be addressed by acting together, which is necessary for achieving collaboration and mutual learning for nonprofits. Many pressing concerns are universal, and can only be tackled by multi-sectoral collaboration and sharing mechanisms. Working together guarantees long-term prosperity for all, reduces duplicity of actions and plays a key role in informing coherent policy-making for better global impacts.

Despite the dynamics of power among nonprofits in Nigeria that hinder proper information sharing and constitute barriers to collective knowledge development, nonprofits should see themselves as partners, collaborate, share information and commit to mutual learning from all stakeholders for the good of their organisation and the society at large.

This newsletter is supported by Forus. However, the ideas and opinions presented in this document do not necessarily represent those of Forus, NNNGO or any other organisations mentioned.

KETURAH SPEAK

In the role she plays as a woman humanitarian, NNNGO’s correspondent, Olaife Ilori met with Keturah Shammah, Executive Director – Girls Education Mission International. A development practitioner with immense value in promoting the social, physical and economic development of the female gender. She has a global mandate of eradicating poverty as well as promoting and creating a sustainable impact for the female folks through quality education.

For more than a decade now, Keturah has been promoting girls’ rights for quality education such that they reach their potentials. A Leading Advocate for the achievement of the GLOBAL GOALS – AGENDA 2030, Keturah Shammah was involved in the just-concluded SPEAK CAMPAIGN, a Global Campaign launched by CIVICUS – World Alliance for Citizen Participation.     The SPEAK GLOBAL CAMPAIGN helps give a voice to everyone, everywhere. The campaign was created in response to the current global context in which people around the world are facing increasing attacks on their basic freedoms causing many to turn against each other. SPEAK! in one day of global action on September 20th represented the evolution of the Global Day of Citizen Action.  #TogetherWeSpeak

 

Follow the conversation:

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Your Foundation is GIRLS EDUCATION MISSION INTERNATIONAL; could you intimate us more on the kind of work your Foundation is involved in?

Girls Education Mission International helps girls in reaching their potentials. We focus on defending, protecting and promoting the right to education of girls through various activities such as Policy advocacy, supporting girls in school with school fees, sanitary pads, Uniforms and as well provide mentoring and relevant services to build their life skills.

 

I hear you are a SPEAK CHAMPION, was this Campaign your INITIATIVE? And if NO, how did you come by this laudable INITIATIVE?

SPEAK! The campaign was not initiated by our organization, it is a Campaign coordinated by CIVICUS- World Alliance for Citizen Participation. There was a call for application by CIVICUS for SPEAK Champions, we applied and fortunately after review of over 260 applications from 66 countries across the world, our organization was selected as 2019 Champion to mobilize and coordinate the activities of interested organizations to hold SPEAK Event in Nigeria.

 

So are you the only SPEAK CHAMPION in Nigeria?

No! There are Five (5) SPEAK Champions in Nigeria. SPEAK! is a Global Campaign. It cuts across countries of the World. In Nigeria, it is a nationwide Campaign. Our organization mobilized and coordinated the Campaign in the Northern Part of the country alongside other four Champions from the East, West and Southern parts of the Country.

 

How many organizations/individuals was your organization able to mobilize for the SPEAK CAMPAIGN Project in Nigeria?

We were able to mobilize over eight (8) organizations that held over 10 events and reached over 200 persons.

 

In response to the current global context, As a SPEAK CHAMPION, do you think the SPEAK CAMPAIGN can indeed speak and address the increasing attacks/issues/challenges faced by people world over?

For me SPEAK! Campaign is the answer to increasing attacks/issues and challenges faced by people world over. This is because, over the years, the female gender is particularly looking for answers to social issues affecting them and seeking opportunities to speak about their unheard challenges. The SPEAK Campaign hence provides such opportunities for them to come together with experts who are in the position to provide solutions to these struggles.

 

As a SPEAK CHAMPION, you created several events for the success of this Campaign and I am well aware that your Organization’s thematic function is on GILRS’ EDUCATION, my question is: do girls really have a future as regards education particularly in this part of the world?

The future of girls in line with education is the reality that educated mothers are more likely to send their children to school as uneducated mothers while helping their families break out of the cycle of Poverty in the process especially in developing countries. In order words “Better educated women tend to be healthier, participate more in the formal labour market, earn higher incomes, have fewer children, marry at a later age, make better health decisions and education for their children should they choose to become mothers”.

 

How sustainable is the future for young girls of this generation as regards the SPEAK CAMPAIGN

The sustainability for young girls of this generation as regards the SPEAK Campaign is guaranteed because; the Campaign aims at solving social issues surrounding the female gender. Through the SPEAK Campaign, issues regarding the girl child is addressed and plan to build girls future are well underway. For instance, our SPEAK Events this year focused on tackling the issues of GENDER VIOLENCE in Nigeria. The event brought together young girls and their male counterparts (boys whom they consider to be one of their distractions) from various locations and backgrounds to discuss issues affecting the girls and provide possible solutions to those problems. The girls were inspired to SPEAK their Possibilities against any form of violence they might face; hence – an advocacy Campaign was known as #IamPossible to be formally launched soon as one of our lined-up plans to sustaining the future of girls in Nigeria.

 

Did you think the CAMPAIGN was able to reach its GOAL?

Of course! Together, we have staged almost 180 events across 55 countries bringing together people across lines of division to have powerful conversations that create real change. And that’s the Goal of SPEAK! Campaign.

 

In what ways do you plan on ensuring the Campaign engages people to continue speaking even after it is well behind us?

The #IamPossible Campaign is one of our innovative ways of engaging the girls to SPEAK their possibilities and engage relevant stakeholders to advocate for nurturing and safeguarding the Possibilities of Girls. The SPEAK Campaign T-shirts provided for each participant SPEAKs more than a thousand words. The SPEAK Event Participants have resolved to carry out the Campaign and share an impactful version of the event to not less than 3 persons. May I end with this quote “SPEAK! Is not just a one day Campaign, it is a step by step process to solve several social issues” Frederic Adou, SPEAK Campaign Consultant CIVICUS.

 

 

NNNGO Newsletter on Understanding the Companies and Allied Matters Act – September, 2019

NNNGO Newsletter on Understanding the Companies and Allied Matters Act – September, 2019

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Constitutions help set the rules guiding the operation of nonprofits. They are important because they establish procedures that everyone can rely on and give a level of certainty about how the organisation should be run; the rules and processes provided in the constitution binds the board, the organisation and its members. Legally, a nonprofit’s constitution is what the Corporate Affairs Commission (CAC) uses to determine its object and decide if it is indeed, a nonprofit.

The first thing nonprofits need to understand when setting up their organisation or applying formally to the Corporate Affairs Commission is to ensure that their board meets either physically or online to discuss the constitution and agree to its adoption; the minutes of this meeting must be documented for future purposes.

When drafting a constitution, nonprofits should ensure that their constitution states the name or title of the organisation, clearly articulates the aims/objects(charitable purpose) of the organisation, clearly sets out the role/powers of the board indicating their job descriptions, appointment/tenure of office and replacement of trustees, how meetings of the board are called and held and what would happen if the organisation must wind up.

At this point, it is important for the prospective board(trustees) to read the constitution and accept responsibility through a signed document for leading the governance of the organisation and ensuring its effectiveness.

It is highly recommended that nonprofits do not copy and paste their organisational constitution to ensure that the constitution and governance documents accurately reflects their organisations’ peculiarities, situations that are unique to how their organisation operates or will operate; this constitution should contain rules that the particular nonprofit understand and will be able to follow.

Ultimately, nonprofits are required to have in place a constitution that governs its operations and safeguards it for efficient and effective running of day to day activities.  

This newsletter is supported by the Commonwealth Foundation. However, the ideas and opinions presented in this document do not necessarily represent those of Commonwealth Foundation, NNNGO or any other organisations mentioned. 

Joint Statement by African Civil Society Leaders on Xenophobic Attacks on African Foreign nationals in South Africa.

(Lagos, September 5, 2019) Civil Society actors across Africa have expressed deep concern and condemned the ongoing violence against African foreign nationals in South Africa.

This comes in the wake of recent xenophobic attacks reportedly perpetrated by South African citizens against other African foreign nationals who reside and own businesses in the country’s largest city, Johannesburg. The recent attacks which allegedly began between September 1 and 2, 2019 have been described as inhumane acts of violence in which lives and properties of many African foreigners, resident in South Africa have been lost.

In a statement signed by 10 civil society organisations and coalitions from across Africa, the actors led by the Executive Director, Nigeria Network of NGOs, Oyebisi B. Oluseyi, describe the attacks as criminal, as they contravene the provisions of the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights, stating; “…these attacks regress our common economic and development agenda as Africans as enshrined in Agenda 2063 and stands in the way of attaining the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA) recently put in place by our governments to ensure that as citizens of mother Africa, we become prosperous.” They also noted that the xenophobic attacks which have been prevalent over the years challenge the continent’s common heritage and value systems.

In commending the efforts of many global civil society organisations who openly condemned the attacks, they commiserated with victims of the attack while calling on Governments of Nigeria and South Africa as well as the African Union to “develop a comprehensive plan to address this issue and use diplomatic routes to launch a joint-national campaign against crime and xenophobia by tapping into the expertise of civil society and the private sector in these regards” Oyebisi reiterated the commitment of civil society organisations to using their organisational platforms in raising awareness on the need for Africans to remain united especially in the context of Ubuntu.

A final call was also made to the media, leaders of thought, clergy, public servants, politicians, business and civil society in and out of South Africa to use their platforms in educating and sensitizing citizens on the ills of xenophobia and its implications for unity and social cohesion of Africans.

See full statement below 

 

Joint statement made by African civil society leaders on the xenophobic attacks on African foreign nationals in South Africa.

 

5 September 2019

 

We the undersigned leaders of civil society across the African continent are deeply concerned about the ongoing xenophobic attacks on African foreign nationals residing in South Africa. We deeply regret these unfortunate incidents that have claimed the lives and properties of our African brothers and sisters and led to the destruction of their properties and businesses.

 

We are worried that these attacks regress our common economic and development agenda as Africans as enshrined in Agenda 2063 and stands in the way of attaining the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA) recently put in place by our governments to ensure that as citizens of mother Africa we become prosperous.  More than this, the spate of violence undermines our common heritage and value systems as the African people.  These actions negate the provisions of the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights, are inhumane and undermine progress that have been made to advance human rights across the continent.

 

We condemn in its entirety these barbaric acts and call on the government of Nigeria and South Africa, and the African Union to take decisive steps and develop a comprehensive plan of action to address this issue while encouraging our brothers and sisters affected by these attacks to remain calm and continue to remain safe.

 

We welcome the steps already taken by some governments, including the South African and Nigerian Government and further encourage the use of diplomatic routes and launching of a joint-national campaign against crime and xenophobia by tapping into the expertise of civil society and the private sector in these regards.

 

We further commend the calls of our civil society colleagues globally, and particularly in Africa, who openly condemn these attacks.  We encourage them to work with the government and the good people of South Africa in developing plans and actions capable of bringing these attacks to a halt.

 

We are convinced that those who perpetrate these heinous acts do not reflect the values that South Africans cherish and uphold, hence we call on leaders of thought, clergy, public servants, politicians, business and civil society in and out of South Africa to speak up against these attacks; which no doubt could reverse gains already being made on attaining the sustainable development goals across the continent.

 

In order to bring an end to these acts and ensure they don’t recur, law enforcement agencies should act in a timely manner and bring the perpetrators to justice.

 

We call on the media as an integral part of the civil society community to use their platforms in educating and sensitizing citizens on the ills of xenophobia and its implications for unity and social cohesion of Africans.

 

As we continue to monitor the situation and follow up on government interventions to address this crisis, we commit as civil society to using our organisational platforms in raising awareness on the need for us as Africans to become more accommodating and to see each other as one within the context of Ubuntu- I am because you are.

 

Signed

 

  1. Nigeria Network of NGOs, Nigeria
  2. African Monitor, South Africa
  3. Civicus, South Africa
  4. West African Civil Society Institute (WACSI), Ghana
  5. Africa Platform, Kenya
  6. RESOCIDE, Burkina Faso
  7. JOINT Liga de ONGs em Mocambique, Mozambique
  8. Concertation Nationale de la Société Civile du Togo (CNSC-TOGO), Togo
  9. Afrikajom Center, Sénégal
  10. Collectif Contre l’Impunité et la Stigmatisation des Communautés (CISC), Burkina Faso

 

For further information email nnngo@nnngo.org

Pursue Equitable Partnerships and Solidarity – Istanbul Principe VI (September, 2019)

Pursue Equitable Partnerships and Solidarity – Istanbul Principe VI (September, 2019)

Partnerships among CSOs and various stakeholders are vital to cooperation, collaboration and problem-solving as all these are built on trust, mutuality, accountability and solidarity.

In a bid to pursue equitable partnerships and solidarity, there is a need for CSOs to see themselves as partners rather than competitors. This translates to a commitment to goals, efforts, and problems of other development actors in order to facilitate effective collaborations and information sharing which allows for local, national and global development.

It is important to note, however, that openness among all stakeholders; government, private sector, civil society, and the citizens will minimize the rate of conflicts while ensuring equitable partnerships and solidarity.

The sixth Istanbul principle of development effectiveness states thus – “CSOs are effective as development actors when they commit to transparent relationships with CSOs and other development actors,freely and as equals, based on shared development goals and values, mutual respect, trust, organizational autonomy, long-term accompaniment, solidarity and global citizenship”.

CSOs are encouraged to collaborate with other organisations who share their goals in order to maximize resources to achieve bigger impact. Even though the challenges of partnerships cannot be overlooked, CSOs must develop strong systems of conflict resolution to address disputes and issues that may arise during collaborations.

NNNGO Newsletter on Understanding the Companies and Allied Matters Act – August, 2019

NNNGO Newsletter on Understanding the Companies and Allied Matters Act – August, 2019

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Nonprofit mergers are becoming a common trend in many countries and are now a topic of discussion among nonprofit leaders, board and funders. Mergers provide an avenue to preserve and strengthen needed service provided by nonprofits to diverse communities.

The Part F of the Companies and Allied Matters Act recognizes mergers; paving the way for nonprofits with similar objects and aims to merge under terms and conditions prescribed by the Corporate Affairs Commission. Lessons from studies and research have shown that mergers; improve image, reputation and public support for nonprofits, increases financial stability and efficiency of operations.

Merging might also help address issues of duplication of efforts and avoiding solvency especially with the difficult economic climate and the fact that the funding terrain for nonprofits is adversely affected.

With the passing of the amended Part F of CAMA, we anticipate an increase in the consideration for mergers by nonprofits to develop greater organizational efficiencies relating to programming, administrative capacity and financial sustainability.

Nonprofit considering mergers should ensure that they fuse with organisations that have similar mission and vision as them, make use of experts in the merger process and seek specialized knowledge on what the structure or emerging organisation, function and legal aspect of the merger would look like.

Nonprofits should also ensure that funders involved in the merger are given the opportunity to give input into the planning; the merging process should be seen as a collaborative one by identifying potential mutual gains that could be realized in the merger. 

This newsletter is supported by the Commonwealth Foundation. However, the ideas and opinions presented in this document do not necessarily represent those of Commonwealth Foundation, NNNGO or any other organisations mentioned. 

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The Practice of Transparency and Accountability- Istanbul V (August, 2019)

The Practice of Transparency and Accountability- Istanbul V (August, 2019)

Transparency and accountability are pivotal to achieving an effective civil society. Transparency refers to being honest and open; by implication, civil society organisations are expected to be clear enough for private and public scrutiny. Accountability is the ability for CSOs to willingly answer and take responsibility for their actions (decisions, activities or policies) and results. This is central to discussions relating to problems in non-profits as they are the two main pillars of good corporate governance and generally guide the way NGOs are operated, regulated or controlled.

Inline with fostering transparency and accountability, there is the need for CSOs to put in place internal self-regulatory mechanisms that serve as a check to their various activities, this is reflected in their governance strategy and structure, human resource and management, project management, monitoring, evaluation and reporting, and their financial management and sustainability.

The measures include – complying with registration and reporting requirements, adopting a core vision, values and mission, electing a board to guide its mission and review its performance, publishing annual reports, documenting administrative procedure, documenting project work plans and budgets, having a monitoring and evaluation system in place, providing sound account of fund management(recording all financial transactions with relevant receipts and supporting documents); putting systems in place to prevent fraud -such as regular audits,two signatures to account; constituent/ stakeholder feedbacks; among others.

CSOs are accountable to the government, donors, beneficiaries (people), partners, mission, board, staff and their fellow CSOs. This fosters responsiveness to the needs of their communities, the people they work with and other stakeholders engaged in development. Hence, proper accountability measures facilitate increase donor and citizen support.

Through advocacy, CSOs have played a critical role in promoting transparency and accountability within the government and the general society which has yielded positive results. However, they have been encouraged to improve their transparency and accountability mechanisms especially due to the increased rate of money laundering and terrorist financing activities that CSOs can be vulnerable to. To maintain public trust, CSOs need to work on improving their level of transparency and accountability.

NNNGO Newsletter on Understanding the Companies and Allied Matters Act – July, 2019

NNNGO Newsletter on Understanding the Companies and Allied Matters Act – July, 2019

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An important step towards financial growth and the promotion of transparency and accountability within a nonprofit organization is strong financial management. Nonprofit organisations are expected to keep a tight record of their financial and accounting operations as this improves their documentation processes and helps to take stock of their spending. 

Under the Companies and Allied Matters Act, CAMA, nonprofits have an obligation to the Corporate Affairs Commission, CAC, to correctly keep records that explain how the organization spends and receives its money or other assets (day to day transactions). When nonprofits show records of how it runs; it helps the organisation demonstrate to regulators that it is actively operating and working towards its objectives and remains eligible as a registered nonprofit. This practice also helps to show whether or not the organisation is in good financial health and is being run efficiently.   

Nonprofits are to ensure that they keep operational records which will ideally be stated in the statement of accounts prepared by the bank; doing this shows that the organisation is operating as a nonprofit and meeting its obligations under the part F of CAMA and with relevant authorities, stakeholders and donors. Though this process might be delegated, it is the responsibility of the Board to ensure that the organisation’s accounting records are kept and prepared according to relevant accounting principles adopted by the organisation.

The law requires that nonprofits have preserved accounting financial records for a period of six years from the date of the organisation’s inception for effective transparency and accountability processes.

To adhere to this requirement, nonprofits are required to ensure that financial reports, receipts of transactions and all evidences of payments are correctly recorded, allow for true and fair statements prepared  and audited by an audit firm for large organisations while smaller nonprofits can prepare a statement of affairs (a profit and loss account). This document is vital to the process of filing annual returns with the CAC. 

This newsletter is supported by the Commonwealth Foundation. However, the ideas and opinions presented in this document do not necessarily represent those of Commonwealth Foundation, NNNGO or any other organisations mentioned. 

Creating Awareness about Hepatitis on World Hepatitis Day

Creating Awareness about Hepatitis on World Hepatitis Day

                                                                                  LOVE YOUR LIVER

A major global public health challenge, endemic in many parts of the world, with the highest prevalence in sub-Saharan Africa and East Asia, the Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infects more than 300 million people worldwide and is a common cause of liver disease and liver cancer. Viral hepatitis is the seventh leading cause of death globally, making it a silent killer and responsible for about 1.44 million deaths annually. Often times, many adults infected with the virus recover, but 5 to10 % are unable to clear the virus thus becoming chronically infected.

Hepatitis is an inflammatory condition of the liver, commonly caused by a viral infection. However, there are other possible causes of hepatitis; autoimmune hepatitis and hepatitis that occurs as a secondary result of medications, drugs, toxins, and alcohol. Autoimmune hepatitis occurs when the body makes antibodies against liver tissue while Hepatitis B is an infection caused by the hepatitis B virus. The virus is found in the blood and body fluids of an infected person and could be spread through unprotected sex with an infected person or sharing sharp objects with infected persons.

In 2015, hepatitis B resulted in 887,000 deaths, mostly from complications and 2,850,000 were recorded to be newly infected in 2017.  About two-thirds of patients with acute HBV infection sometimes have a mild illness that usually goes undetected, until the person becomes seriously ill from the virus. While the hepatitis B virus can survive outside the body for at least 7 days, it has an incubation period of up to 75 days and maybe detected within 30 to 60 days after infection which by then could develop into chronic hepatitis B with symptoms comprising, a general sick feeling, diarrhea, aches and pains, high temperature, loss of appetite, lethargy, abdominal pain, jaundice and dark urine.

The 5 types of viral hepatitis include hepatitis A, B, C, D, and E. Hepatitis A is always an acute, short-term disease, Hepatitis E is usually acute but can be particularly dangerous in pregnant women. Causes of noninfectious hepatitis include alcohol and some toxins.

In Africa, chronic viral hepatitis affects over 70 million Africans; 60 million with Hepatitis B and 10 million with Hepatitis C. Sadly, the disease affects the most youthful and productive Africans, causing catastrophic financial liability in its treatment.

Nigeria is one of the countries with the highest population in the world; with children and young adults constituting the bulk of these numbers. It is important to note that the commonest cause of liver disease in Nigeria is Hepatitis B and although pregnant women are generally considered at a lower risk for HBV infection, the rate of infected pregnant women as high as 11%, have been reported in southern parts of the country. In 2016, the Federal Government affirmed that over 22.6 million Nigerians lived with Hepatitis, with about 30% unaware of their status.

It is most important that knowledge around the Hepatitis disease and how best to eradicate it is shared by everyone. World Hepatitis Day is one of eight official global public health campaigns marked by the World Health Organization and the theme for this year’s World Hepatitis Day is ‘Invest in Eliminating Hepatitis’, highlighting the need for governments around the world to take active steps towards combating the virus.

Coordinating a global response to hepatitis has paved way to finding cure for hepatitis C and treatment and vaccine for hepatitis B. Interestingly, vaccine against hepatitis B has been available since 1982 and the vaccine is 95% effective in preventing infection and the development of chronic disease and liver cancer, chronic hepatitis B infection can thus be treated with medications including safe and effective vaccines ensuring millions do not suffer anymore. Because Hepatitis affects everyone, everywhere and much closer than we think, as humans, let us begin to love our livers so we could have healthier and longer lives.

Although, Nigeria has embarked on a journey to finding a cure by registering hepatitis-related cases, adopting universal vaccination, screening all donated blood, implementing policies aimed at prevention of mother to child infections and ensuring that all infants receive the hepatitis B vaccine immediately after birth, preferably within 24 hours, there is still a lot more to be done.

For you to love your liver and be able to live longer, you must know, prevent, test and be sure to treat Hepatitis. While care is aimed at maintaining comfort and adequate nutritional balance, including replacement of fluids lost from vomiting and diarrhea, it is important to encourage prevention through vaccination.

WPChat